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A 'how to' manual of preventative maintenance, replacement parts, upgrades, and...

Information from the files of Bud Taplin, the former General Manager of Westsail Corporation, and founder and proprietor of Worldcruiser Yacht Company. This manual contains a collection of service information, preventative maintenance tips, upgrade modifications and parts, and replacement parts availability for the entire line of Westsail cruising sailboats.

First published in January, 1996 by Worldcruiser Yacht Company. All rights reserved. Not to be duplicated without permission of Worldcruiser Yacht Company.

This manual will be periodically updated and revised. A file is kept of all manuals sent out, and updates will be sent upon request. Any suggestions, comments, or additions to this information will be gladly accepted.

The prices shown are as of the date on each information sheet. Prices are subject to change, but you will be notified at the time of order if the prices are different from those shown in the manual.

A four page updated price sheet is available at no charge if you have a previous edition and wish to update just the prices in your manual.


Westsail Parts Company - Westsail Service Manual
— Table of Contents —


Front Material
Front Cover
Table of Contents
Section A: Mast & Rigging
A-01: Tuning the Mast Rigging
A-02: Replacement of Running Rigging
A-03: Standing Rigging (W32)
A-04: Split Backstays with Chainplates on Hull (W32)
A-05: Forestay Release Lever
A-06: Replacement Turnbuckles
A-07: Chainplates
A-08: Bobstay Fittings
A-09: Boomkin Stay Tang Failures
A-10: Boomkin Crosspiece Failure (W32)
A-11: Bowsprit Attachment & Staysail Eyebolt
A-12: Bobstay Wire Failures
A-13: Running Backstays
A-14: Furling Gear
A-15: Reefing Kit
A-16: Replacement Winches & Parts
A-17: Boom Vang & Preventer
A-18: Cruising Spinnakers
A-19: Mast Support Problem (W32)
A-20: Mainsheet Traveler Track System (W32)
A-21: Mast Lowering with a Tabernacle Base
A-22: Tabernacle Mast Base Conversion
A-23: Boom Goosenecks
A-24: Sail Plan (W32)
A-25: Lazyjacks (W28/W32)
Section B: Rails, Bowsprit, Boomkin
B-01: Wooden Bowsprit Delamination & Dry Rot
B-02: SS Box Bowsprit (W28/W32)
B-03: Stainless Steel Pipe Bowsprit (W32)
B-04: SS Bowsprit Installations
B-05: SS Boomkins, Pulpits, Ladders (W32)
B-06: SS Boomkin Installation (W32)
B-07: Stern Pulpit (W32)
B-08: Mainsheet Hoop & Fiddle Block
B-09: Stern Pulpit (W28)
B-10: Long Double Rail Bow Pulpit (W28/W32)
B-11: Braced Mast Rails or Mast Pulpits
B-12: Boom Gallows (All Westsail Models)
B-13: Pulpits, Rails, Stanchions & Lifelines
Section C: Exterior Hardware
C-01: Hawse Pipes
C-02: Scupper Drain Tubes
C-03: Portlight Glass, Screens & Gaskets
C-04: Genoa Track
C-05: Split Cockpit Floor Modification
C-06: Cockpit Floor Hatch
C-07: Cabintop Hatches
C-08: Biminis, Dodgers & Hardtops
C-09: Loose-Footed Staysail
C-10: Anchor Rollers
C-11: Anchor Chain, Mooring Pendant & Windlass
Section D: Hull & Deck, Gelcoat, Bottom
D-01: Hull Numbers
D-02: Centerline Bonding and Hull to Deck Joint
D-03: Gelcoat Degradation with Age
D-04: Cabintop Nonskid
D-05: Osmotic Blistering
D-06: Teak Decks - Cleaning & Recaulking
D-07: Fiberglass Rudder Gudgeons
D-08: SS Pintals & Gudgeons (W32)
D-09: Rudder Washers
D-10: Westsail Rudders
D-11: Rudder Line-Preventer
D-12: Tillers (W28/W32)
D-13: Autopilot Installation (W32)
D-14: Ballast Specs & Location
Section E: Interior
E-01: Icebox Insulation
E-02: Hull & Cabin Insulation
E-03: Propane Tank Location
E-04: Shipmate Stove Burners & Conversion to Propane
Section F: Engine, Shaft, Prop
F-01: Broken Engine Mount Brackets (W32)
F-02: Engine Mounts
F-03: Engine Re-Powering Choices (W32)
F-04: Engine Speeds, Vibration & Boat Speed
F-05: Propeller Choices
F-06: Replacing a Shaft Bearing
F-07: Install Shaft Log after Replacing an Engine
F-08: Exhaust Systems
F-09: Beta 25 (BD-902) Engine (W28)
F-10: Beta 38 (BV-1505) Engine (W32)
F-11: Beta 38 (BV-1505) Small Pan Install (W32)
F-12: Beta 38 (BV-1505) Full Liner Install (W32)
Section G: Plumbing, Tanks
G-01: Fuel Tanks (W32)
G-02: Starboard Fuel Tank Replacement (W32)
G-03: Tank Replacement (W42/W43)
G-04: Aluminum Tank Electrolysis
G-05: Seacocks & Replacement Cones
G-06: Polyethylene Water Tank (W32)
G-07: Polyethylene Holding Tanks
Section H: Electrical & Electronics
H-01: Electrical Grounding Systems on a Sailboat
H-02: Mast Electrical Wiring Problems
H-03: Underwater Electrolysis
H-04: Aluminum Tank Electrolysis
Section J: Miscellaneous Information
J-01: SS Failures
J-02: Leaks & Dry Rot
J-03: Hull Blisters
J-04: Boat Values
J-05: Random Observations after Many Surveys
J-06: Large & Small Musts on a Cruising Boat
J-07: Manuals
J-08: Excessive Tiller Load, Sail Trim & Balance
J-09: Mast Servicing
J-10: Survey Information & Costs
J-11: Boatmoving Dimensions
Section K: External References
K-01: Weaving the Dream
K-04: Lines Drawing (W32)

Section A-01
MAST TUNING

First loosen all of the turnbuckles about three or four turns. You may need to remove the locking cotter pins, or loosen the locknuts, depending on the type of turnbuckles you have. Spray some lubricant on the threads to make it easier, and prevent galling of the threads. Check to see the turnbuckles all operate in the same direction. The right hand thread should be towards the wire, and the left hand thread towards the chainplate.

On the Westsail 32, if you have not done so already, it would be a good idea to install the bolts through the deckbeams and the main bulkhead to help the mast support post do its job properly. The bobstay and boomkin whisker stays should be checked to see they are snug, and the bowsprit and boomkin should be straight, or with a slight hint of bending down, which will be brought back straight when the rig is tightened. Check to see that the bolts holding the bowsprit and boomkin have not shifted or bent.

Since you are adjusting the rigging, it is a good time to visually check all of the swaged fittings for signs of hairline cracks starting. Clean off the stainless with a Scotchbrite pad, and use a magnifying glass, or some dye penetrant wiped on the fittings to indicate cracks starting. Carefully check the strap ends of the turnbuckles for cracks, and also the area of the barrel between the slot and the end, if you have the stainless barrel turnbuckles that Westsail used on many of the boats. Also look at the ends of the chainplates for signs of cracks starting. If you have a Westsail 32, and the boomkin tangs are the original 1" wide ones, replace them with wider ones, as these have failed on many other boats.

The next thing to do is to get the mast rake correct in the boat, using the headstay and backstay to adjust it. Check to see the boat is floating level with the waterline, and then tie a weight to the main halyard, and suspend it just above the boom on the aft side of the mast. The line should hang about 6" behind the mast, as the Westsail 28 and 32 should have the mast almost vertical. The Westsail 42 and 43 should have the line about 18" behind the mast. Adjust and tighten the headstay and backstay to achieve the correct rake, and the wires should be very snug.

Next get the mast centered in the boat, using the upper shrouds. Use the halyard, and check the distance to the upper chainplate hole on each side. Adjust the upper shrouds until the length of the halyard is the same on both sides, and these shrouds should be just snug. Next to adjust are the four lower shrouds. Sight up the track of the mast to see if the mast is bending to either side, or fore and aft. Tighten the shrouds evenly, continually checking to see there is no bend in the mast when sighting up the sail track. The four lowers should be set very snug, being careful to balance them so that the mast does not bend and get out of a straight line.

The staysail stay should be adjusted next. Since there is no permanent stays to resist the pull of the staysail stay, it cannot be set too tight. Just tighten it enough so that the mast just starts to bow forward where it is attached, then back off about a half turn on the turnbuckle.

If you have access to a tension gauge, use it now to balance the stays so they all have an even tension on them. If not, pull and shake each wire to see if they feel the same. The four lowers, headstay and backstay should all feel very tight, the uppers slightly less, and the staysail stay the loosest of all.

Take the boat out sailing, and sight up the mast on each tack to see that the track is still straight, and the mast is not bending. Tighten the locking nuts, or replace the cotter pins to secure the turnbuckles from unscrewing with vibration.

Section A-02
REPLACEMENT RUNNING RIGGING

Replacement running rigging is available from Westsail Parts Company at very reasonable prices. We normally use a very low stretch dacron braid made by Pelican Rope in Southern California. For the Westsail 28 or Westsail 32, we use 7/16" for all halyards and sheets. On the Westsail 42 or Westsail 43, 7/16" can be used for the halyards, and 1/2" for the sheets.

For the halyards, we splice a small eye, and can add a stainless steel twist lock shackle, or you can send your existing shackles to us, and we will splice them in at no extra charge.

Normally we use white rope, with a black fleck tracer in it. If you prefer to use different colored line for the halyards or sheets, we can supply these. There is an additional charge for the colored line.

If you run the halyards back to the cockpit, be sure and specify that you do when you order, so that we can add sufficient length to reach.

Replacement blocks are available, and we would advise using ball bearing blocks, especially on the mainsheet, to permit the rope to run freely through a four or six part tackle.

For mast lowering, the mainsheet on the W28 has to be 105'. For mast lowering on the W32 the mainsheet has to be 120'. For a mainsheet traveler on the W32 the mainsheet should be 65'.

Section A-02 Price List - Running Rigging

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
W42/W43 50' Main Mast Running Rigging - White VLS with black fleck: 2 - 110' 7/16" halyards, 1 - 105' 7/16" spare halyard, 1 - 80' 7/16" staysail halyard, 1 - 110' 1/2" main sheet, 1 - 130' 1/2" jib sheet, 1 - 75' 1/2" staysail sheet $  490.00 pkg
W42/43 55' Main Mast Running Rigging - White VLS with black fleck: 2 - 120' 7/16" halyards, 1 - 115' 7/16" spare halyard, 1 - 90' 7/16" staysail halyard, 1 - 110' 1/2" main sheet, 1 - 130' 1/2" jib sheet, 1 - 75' 1/2" staysail sheet 520.00 pkg
W42/43 Mizzen Mast Running Rigging - White VLS with black fleck: 1 - 70' 7/16" halyard, 1 - 50' 7/16" sheet 75.00 pkg
W28 Standard Set of Running Rigging - 7/16" VLS braid, white with black fleck : 2 - 80' halyards, 1 - 60' staysail halyard, 1 - 80' main sheet, 1 - 80' jib sheet, 1 - 55' staysail sheet, 1 - 75' spare 320.00 pkg
W32 Standard Set of Running Rigging - 7/16" VLS braid, white with black fleck: 3 - 100' halyards - main, jib, spare, 1 - 70' staysail halyard, 1 - 90' mainsheet, 1 - 90' jib sheet, 1 - 50' staysail sheet 375.00 pkg
7/16" VLS Dacron Rope - White VLS with black fleck (per foot) 0.60 foot
1/2" VLS Dacron Rope - White VLS with black fleck (per foot) 0.75 foot
Colored Line - Additional cost/foot for different colored fleck line (per foot) 0.15 foot
5/16" Stainless Steel Twist-Lock Halyard Shackle 15.00 each
Garhauer Size 30 Ball Bearing Single Block - With swivel shackle for 7/16" rope: Other sizes available (Inquire for pricing) 35.00 each

Section A-03
WESTSAIL 32 STANDING RIGGING

On the Westsail 32 there have been a number of failures of the boomkin stay fittings that have caused extensive rigging repairs to be needed, and in more than one case, the entire mast, rig, sails, etc. went overboard and was lost.

The early Westsail 32s had a wooden crosspiece on the boomkin, with a U bolt to hold the backstay. This piece must be carefully checked for rot and cracking that could let the U bolt pull out. Westsail then made a stainless crosspiece with a 2" web. Some of this type have bent under heavy loads, but I have not heard of any failures. The current design has a 4" vertical web, with a reinforcing bar below the backstay ear. These boomkin crosspieces are available if you need to replace yours.

A major problem point is the boomkin stay tang bolted to the hull. The early boats had a 1" wide tang, with a 1/2" hole for the pin on the stay, leaving less than 1/4" of metal around the hole. The condition of the metal around the hole is not readily visible for inspection because it is covered with the toggle end of the stay. Being in and out of the water, and flexed with loads, the end of this tang can develop unseen cracks and hole elongation. The failure of this tang has caused the loss of the entire rig on more than one instance. The turnbuckle on the stay should be loosened, the pin on the toggle end pulled out, and the end of the tang carefully inspected for fractures at every haulout.

After 1975, the width of the tang was increased to 1-1/4" wide, giving enough cross section area around the hole to prevent elongation. New 1-1/2" wide tangs are available, as well as new wire stays with swaged ends. The new 1-1/2" tangs fit in the same holes as the old ones, and are easily replaced. You must still check for cracking and corrosion, including the toggle strap on the end of the stay. The condition of the swage to the wire should be checked for hairline cracks on the swage. We use 9/32" 1 x 19 Sailbryte wire as it is more corrosion resistant than the 304 grade normally used.

The other stay that should be checked at least once a year is the bobstay, primarily the end down at the waterline. The toggle strap or fork also corrodes, and hairline cracks develop on the swaged fitting. A replacement bobstay is available of Sailbryte wire with new fittings swaged on both ends. The whisker stays and hull tangs for the bowsprit rarely seem to have any problems, but they should be checked in any event as a precaution. Keep a zinc attached to the bobstay hull fitting to protect against electrolysis.

Replacement standing rigging is available from Westsail Parts Company, at very competitive prices. After 8 to 10 years the lower end swage fittings may develop hairline cracks, or broken strands. This is a sign that the rigging should be replaced. Most W-32s had 9/32" wire, with marine eyes at both ends. If you can exactly measure each wire from eye to eye, new rigging with identical swaged eyes can be supplied. If you cannot measure the wire, or as an alternative on a new installation, wire is available with a marine eye swaged on the upper end, and the wire left long with a bare lower end. A Norseman or Staloc fitting is available to install yourself after marking the location of the turnbuckle on the lower end.

New turnbuckles are available from Westsail Parts Company, with either a stainless steel centerbody, or with a chrome bronze open centerbody. In either case, the threaded ends are stainless steel with strap toggle ends. If you need to replace only parts of your turnbuckles, the center bodies, or the right or left hand threaded toggle ends are available.

Section A-03 Price List - Westsail 32 Standing Rigging System Parts Costs

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
1-1/2" Bowsprit Stay Tangs - 1-1/2" width with fasteners. (sold as a pair). $  100.00 pkg
Topping lift - W32 - 39' x 1/8" vinyl coated wire with end fittings, small block, 22' x 3/8" rope tail 80.00 pkg
SS Boomkin Crosspiece Web - 2" x 4" with fasteners 275.00 pkg
1-1/2" Boomkin Stay Tangs - 1-1/2" width with fasteners. (sold as a pair) 100.00 pkg
SS Staysail Eyebolt - 1/2" x 6" with fender washer, lock washer & nut 55.00 each
Boomkin Stay Wires with Swaged End Fittings - 9/32" Sailbryte stainless wire with marine "eye to toggle" swaged end fittings. These are normally 33-1/2", but please specify length and end fittings (sold as one pair) 205.00 pkg
Bobstay Wire with Swaged End Fittings - 3/8" Sailbryte stainless steel wire with marine "eye to toggle" swaged end fittings. Normally 8' 5", but please specify length. 185.00 pkg
Bowsprit Whisker Wires with Swaged End Fittings - 3/16" Sailbryte stainless steel wire with marine "eye to toggle" swaged end fittings. Normally 11' 3", but please specify length. 150.00 pkg
Standing Rigging Set - Headstay, backstay, forestay, 2 upper shrouds, 4 lower shrouds. These are 9/32" US-made stainless wire with marine eye, swaged on both ends. Please specify exact length of each wire from eye to eye. 1,440.00 pkg
Standing Rigging Set with bare lower end - Headstay, backstay, forestay, 2 upper shrouds, 4 lower shrouds. These are 9/32" US-made stainless wire with marine eyes swaged upper end only and other end bare. Please specify exact length of each wire from eye to eye. 1,245.00 pkg
Backstay Insulators - Additional cost for two insulators swaged on backstay wire for Hi-Seas radio. 315.00 pkg
Norseman Eye - 9/32" 1x19 wire size with 1/2" pin hole Not available at this time email bud@westsail.com
Staloc Eye - 9/32" 1x19 wire size with 1/2" pin hole 60.00 each
Turnbuckle - 3/8" chrome bronze open barrel turnbuckle with SS toggle ends 50.00 each
Turnbuckle - 1/2" chrome bronze open barrel turnbuckle with SS toggle ends 80.00 each
Turnbuckle - 5/8" chrome bronze open barrel turnbuckle with SS toggle ends 125.00 each
Turnbuckle, Barrel Only - 1/2" chrome bronze open body 35.00 each
Turnbuckle Toggle End Only - Stainless steel toggle end with clevis pin - 1/2", specify left or right hand thread 25.00 each
Halyard Rope - 7/16" Very Low Stretch white braided dacron rope for halyards and sheets 0.60 foot
Terms: - 50% deposit with order, balance COD, plus shipping (+ sales tax in CA)

Section A-04
WESTSAIL 32 SPLIT BACKSTAYS WITH CHAINPLATES ON HULL

I have had a number of owners wish to do away with the boomkin, and use split backstays bolted to the hull on either side. This can be done, and I have the parts available as a set. The chainplates are bolted to the hull just outside of the boomkin, with a filler wedge piece of wood to hold them outside of the rubrail and caprail. The backstay is cut about 6' up, and the turnbuckle and a triangular plate installed on the backstay. Two legs come down to attach to the chainplates on the hull. Approxi-mately 12" to 14" must be cut off the boom for it to clear the new backstay position. You will need to shorten the foot of the mainsail to about 15'. It will not affect the sailing speed of the boat, and will help alleviate some weather helm.

If you wish to retain the boomkin for a wind vane, locate the chainplates just outboard of the boomkin, or about 21" to 22" from the stern. The farther forward you go, the more tiller travel you will have, but the more you will have to cut off the boom to clear the backstay. I have tried to find the optimum position to have good tiller travel, yet still have the end of the boom land on the gallows frame. Spot the chainplates in place with the top hole just above the caprail, and roughly angled to match the backstay, then drill only one of the middle 3/8" holes. Trim the top of the teak wedge to match under the rubrail, then match drill the hole in the teak wedge. Install the two chainplates temporarily with one bolt in each.

Attach the backstay legs to the chainplates, and the other end to the triangular plate. Attach the turnbuckle to the upper hole in the triangular plate and open it almost all the way. Hold the backstay against the turnbuckle as snug as possible, and mark the wire where the turnbuckle pin meets the wire (it takes two people to do this, unless you have three arms). Re-mark the wire so that the Norseman eye turns out at this mark to match the turnbuckle pin. Cut the wire and attach the Norseman fitting.

Hookup the backstay to the turnbuckle and tighten up fairly snug. Align the chainplates so that they are in line with the backstay, and drill the other holes. Permanently mount the chainplates with a ring of caulking around each bolt hole to prevent leaks, and then re-attach the backstay and tighten up.

Raise the boom with the topping lift and mark the boom for cutoff to clear the backstay and yet still rest on the gallows. Depending on the clearance you need, and the location of the gallows and boom hardware, you can make the cut on either end of the boom. To minimize the cutting of the foot of an existing mainsail, use an outhaul car that is reversed, with the sail clew attachment pin aft, and the pulley forward. This will give a few more inches of sail foot length. Your sailmaker should be able to locate one of these for you.

Section A-04 Price List - Westsail 32 Split Backstays with Chainplates on Hull

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Split Backstay Hardware: 2 - chainplates with fasteners, teak wedges, triangle plate, 2 - backstay wire legs with fittings swaged on, 1 - Staloc eye fitting for end of backstay wire $  640.00 pkg

Section A-05
FORESTAY RELEASE LEVER

A release lever can be put on the forestay if you want to move it out of the way to be able to tack with a genoa on the cutter rig.

The lever is stainless steel with a stainless clevis and pivot pins. The quick release pin has a spring loaded stainless ball for positive locking, and a cotter pin hole for permanently securing it. A turnbuckle is built in with 4" of adjustment.

For the Westsail 28 or 32, the release lever has a built-in 1/2" turnbuckle, and handles 1/4" or 9/32" wire. For the Westsail 42 and 43, the turnbuckle is 5/8", and handles 5/16" or 3/8" wire.

A swage fitting is included, to fit the appropriate wire size ordered. It is necessary to have the forestay wire cut at the lower end to have this fitting swaged on. The forestay must be cut at 16" up from the eyebolt on the Westsail 28 or 32, and 17" from the forestay plate hole on the Westsail 42 or 43, and this unit replaces the present turnbuckle. If this cannot be done because of the length of the present turnbuckle, it would be necessary to replace the forestay.

An alternative method is to supply a Norseman stud fitting so that you can cut the wire and install the stud yourself without removing the stay from the boat.


Forestay Lever Release

Unfortunately the company I was purchasing these release levers has gone out of business. If I am able to find another source for them, I will make them available again.

Section A-05 Price List - Forestay Release Lever

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Forestay Release Lever - stainless with swage fitting (for 1/4" or 9/32" wire)
(Not Currently Available)
N/A N/A
Forestay Release Lever - stainless with swage fitting (for 5/16" or 3/8" wire)
(Not Currently Available)
N/A N/A
Swaging of Fitting to Existing Forestay Wire 15.00 each
New 9/32" Forestay for Westsail 32 - includes swaging 175.00 each
Norseman Threaded Stud Fitting - 1/4" wire size Not available at this time email bud@westsail.com
Norseman Threaded Stud Fitting - 9/32" wire size Not available at this time email bud@westsail.com
Norseman Threaded Stud Fitting - 5/16" wire size Not available at this time email bud@westsail.com
Norseman Threaded Stud Fitting - 3/8" wire size Not available at this time email bud@westsail.com

Section A-06
REPLACEMENT TURNBUCKLES

New industry standard turnbuckles are available from Westsail Parts Company, with either a bronze finish or a chrome bronze finish open centerbody. In either case, the threaded ends are stainless steel with a forged tee, and a strap toggle end, with clevis pin. If you need to replace only parts of your turnbuckles, the center bodies, or the right or left hand threaded toggle ends are available. The left hand thread is normally attached to the chainplate, and the right hand thread to the wire. A right hand thread turns clockwise to screw it in. A left hand thread turns counter-clockwise to screw it in.

On many of the Westsail boats a stainless steel center body was used that was made by a local manufacturer in Southern California. These turnbuckles have a round center body with a hex area in the center, and long open slots on both ends of the center body. There has been a problem with these bodies, in that the slots were machined very close to the ends of the body, and many have cracked from the slot to the end of the body due to crevice corrosion of the stainless steel. If you have this type of turnbuckle on the boat, keep a very careful check on the condition of the barrels, or better yet, replace the barrels.

Many of the boats also had Navtec turnbuckles. These have a center thread, rather than a center body, and the ends are barrels with internal threads, and toggle ends. The center thread has a stainless steel square part in the middle, between the left and right hand threads. Some were made with an all stainless steel center thread, and Navtec has had many failures of these turnbuckles, due to corrosion of the thread where it meets the stainless square part in the joint between the left and right hand threads. If you have this design turnbuckle, and the center threads are bronze, then they are usually fine. If however, the threads are stainless, they are subject to failure, and should be replaced with a bronze bronze center thread.


Keep the turnbuckles threads lubricated with a good grade of waterproof grease, such as Lanocote, and try running the thread in and out once a year to make sure they are not seized up. Keep good cotter pins on all of the turnbuckles to prevent them from turning after they are properly adjusted.

Section A-06 Price List - Replacement Turnbuckles

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Turnbuckle - Standard 1/2" chrome bronze open barrel turnbuckle with SS toggle ends $  80.00 each
Turnbuckle Barrel Only - Standard turnbuckle barrel only - 1/2" chrome bronze open body 35.00 each
Turnbuckle Toggle End Only - Standard turnbuckle stainless steel toggle end with clevis pin - 1/2", specify left or right hand thread 25.00 each
Turnbuckle - Navtec - Navtec turnbuckle parts (contact us)

Section A-07
CHAINPLATES

As much as we would like to think stainless steel is a "forever" material, it unfortunately is not, and also usually does not reveal its weakness until it fails. Stainless steel will corrode, and is subject to stress and corrosion cracking within the structure of the metal, while the exterior surface may still appear to be in perfect, shiny condition. This is unlike plain steel, which rusts from the outside, and is plainly visible, or aluminum, which also shows its corrosion on the exterior surfaces.

We have made up replacement chainplates over the years, usually because they have been bent due to damage against a dock or a seawall, or a dismasting, and the top has been bent over. The chainplates used on all of the boats is a 1/4" x 2" x 24" piece of 304 grade stainless steel. The Westsail 28 and Westsail 32 have four 3/8" square holes to mount them, with 3/8" carriage bolts. The Westsail 42 and Westsail 43 have five 1/2" carriage bolts.

Upon making some replacement chainplates for a Westsail 42, we discovered that on some of Westsail's drawings for the chainplates, it called for the square holes to be .60" in size, which is really too big for a .50" bolt, and the carriage bolt can rotate in the hole, and also the bolt does not fit the chainplate hole properly to distribute the load over all of the bolts. Some owners have found cracks radiating out from the square hole, and it was necessary to replace some of the chainplates. We have also heard of instances where the chainplate has started to deteriorate on the backside where it meets the hull, due to water being trapped there, and crevice corrosion starting. It would be a good idea to remove some of the 1/2" carriage bolts, and carefully check for the start of cracks radiating out from the square holes. We are also making the chainplates with square or round mounting holes, and supply button head Allen bolts for the round holes.

If you are preparing for a major voyage, it would be a good idea to remove at least one chainplate in order to be able to inspect the backside, and also check the condition of the carriage bolts. The top end should also be checked periodically for signs of cracks at the bend, or around the hole the turnbuckle attaches to. If the top of the chainplate has been bent from hitting a piling or seawall (by a previous owner, of course), you might want to carefully clean the chainplate with a Scotch-brite pad, and inspect it with a magnifying glass, and maybe some dye penetrant.

The replacement chainplates we make are 304 grade stainless steel, electropolished after fabrication to remove impurities due to fabrication, and then buffed to a mirror finish on the exterior surfaces. When replacing, put a ring of caulking around each bolt hole, and under the head of each bolt.

RIGGING SWAGE ENDS

While you are inspecting the chainplates, it is a good idea to carefully inspect the swaged terminal fittings on the ends of the standing rigging, primarily at the lower ends. Water comes down the wire and gets into the swage fitting, causing cracks to start on the fitting, especially those that have been highly stressed due to overswaged. Fortunately, the majority of the swaging on the Westsails was done correctly, and the rigging has lasted 20 years or so, although most rigging shops recommend replacing the standing rigging every 10 years.

Section A-07 Price List - Chainplates

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Chainplate for W28 or W32 - with new 3/8" bolts, lock washers, and nuts (W28/W32). Specify straight or with bend, and with square mounting holes. $  130.00 each
Chainplate for W42 or W43 - with new 1/2" bolts, lock washers, and nuts (W42/W43 mainmast). Specify straight or with bend or if for the mizzen. 140.00 each

Section A-08
BOBSTAY FITTINGS

The early Westsail 32s had the bobstay fitting on the hull at the bow waterline made from two stainless steel exterior plates, that were bolted onto the hull on the outside with four 3/8" carriage bolts on each plate. The front end was separated enough to permit the bobstay wire eye end to go between the two plates, and a 5/8" bolt and locknut were used to attach the stay end.

This design was changed to an internally mounted bobstay fitting, and this same fitting was used on the rest of the line of boats. On the W28 and W32 this fitting has a 3/8" thick stainless plate, welded to a 2" x 2" angle stainless, attached so the angle forms a V with the thick ear piece. A slot is cut in the stem of the boat, and the plate inserted from the inside, set in a bed of fiberglass putty, and bonded over with layers of mat and roving on the inside of the hull. The external seam was then caulked to prevent water from weeping into the cut. The bobstay fitting on the Westsail 42 and 43 uses a 1/2" thick plate, with a 3" x 3" x 10" angle stainless, with holes slightly over 3/4".

The bobstay fitting should be carefully inspected periodically for signs of corrosion and electrolysis. I have seen these eaten up by electrolysis, especially when the boat is loaded enough so that the fitting is constantly in the water. I recommend that a small zinc be attached to the lower end of the fitting to protect it from electrolysis. Since these fittings are installed through the hull, with a V piece of stainless steel welded to the backside, and bonded over, it is possible for the caulking around the fitting to harden, and permit water to weep in around the fitting. Also, when some previous owner rammed the dock with the stem of the boat, the bobstay fitting may have been loosened, and water can seep in, starting crevice corrosion. Renew the bead of caulking around the bobstay fitting by using masking tape to define the edges of the caulking bead, fill with polyurethane caulking, wipe the excess to smooth it out, then pull the tape to make a perfect bead of caulking.

BOBSTAY FITTING LEAKS A slight weeping problem of the bobstay fitting is not too unusual. I have heard of it happening to some boats. As long as the inside glassing is good, then cleaning out and re-caulking the outside of the slot against the fitting is correct. Use a polyurethane caulking rather than an epoxy putty, as it is more flexible, and should hold out the water and last longer than epoxy. Use masking tape to mask off the seam width on the hull and the fitting, put on the bead of caulking, force it into the crack, then wipe off the excess with a small rounded tool or stick. Pull the tape, and you will have a clean caulked seam. Move some weight out of the bow and into the stern to raise the fitting above the water if you are doing this job while still afloat. Be sure to put a piece of zinc on the bobstay fitting to prevent electrolysis, as I have seen a number of these get pitted out by electrolysis. Use a pair of small round zinc plates normally used on metal rudders, and attach through the bottom hole in the bobstay fitting, or drill an extra hole near the bottom corner of the fitting.

I also talked to an owner recently that said he experienced electrolysis between his galvanized chain bobstay and the stainless steel bobstay fitting in the hull. The stainless fitting lost out, and the hole broke out on the fitting. I do not recommend using chain for a bobstay.

Section A-08 Price List - Bobstay Fitting

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Bobstay Fitting - Internal - W28, W32 - SS internal through hull (W28/W32) $  195.00 each
Bobstay Fitting - Internal - W42, W43 - SS internal through hull (W42/W43) 225.00 each
Bobstay Fitting - External - W32 - SS external (W32) with fasteners 295.00 each
Zinc for Bobstay Fitting - 2" round pair with fastener 5.00 each

Section A-09
BOOMKIN STAY TANG FAILURES

A major rigging problem point on the W32 is the boomkin stay tangs bolted to the hull at the stern. The early boats had a 1" wide tang, with a 1/2" clearance hole for the pin on the stay, leaving less than 1/4" of metal around the hole. The condition of the metal around the hole is not readily visible for inspection because of the carriage bolt heads, and the toggle on the end of the stay. Being in and out of the water, and flexed with loads, the end of this tang can develop unseen cracks and hole elongation. After 1976, the width of the tang was increased to 1-1/4" wide, giving enough cross section area around the hole to prevent elongation, however I now increased the width to 1-1/2". The hull tangs for the bowsprit whisker stays rarely seem to have any problems (except if you have been running into pilings), but they should be checked in any event as a precaution. We have been made aware of stress cracks radiating out from the square bolt hole on the tangs. The area around each hole should be carefully inspected for signs cracks developing.

I recommend that the boomkin tangs be inspected at every haulout. I suggest that the tangs be first checked to see if they are in good alignment with the wire. Next the nuts should be taken off from the inside of the lazarette, or the back end of the engine compartment, wherever the bolts come through. The turnbuckles should be opened about a half inch, and the tangs pulled off of the hull. Everything should be carefully checked, especially the backside of the tang, the condition around all of the holes, and the condition of the bolts. If any cracks or crevis corrosion is found, the part should be replaced. Also check the fittings on the underside of the back end of the boomkin. When replacing, attach the bolt on the end of the tang, then tighten up the turnbuckle to make sure the tang is in good alignment. If it is not, then re-drill the other hole, or take the tang off, seal up the other hole with epoxy putty, and then re-attach and drill a new hole to install the second bolt. Put a ring of caulking around each hole, and under the head of the bolt. Do not caulk the entire backside of the tangs. Stainless needs contact with oxygen in the air to prevent crevis corrosion, and water can only come through the holes themselves.



Of course, the stay wires should be carefully inspected for any signs of hairline cracks on the swaged fittings, especially on the lower one. On some of the boats, the toggle end on the lower eye has a removable pin, and when replacing the wire, the toggle and pin can be reused, if they are still in good condition. If ordering new wires, measure from hole to hole on the end fittings of the wire, with the turnbuckle half open.

Section A-09 Price List - Boomkin Stay Tangs and Wires

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Boomkin Stay Tangs - for W28 or W32, 1-1/2" wide with fasteners $  100.00 pair
Bowsprint Stay Tangs - for W28 or W32, 1-1/2" wide with fasteners 100.00 pair
Boomkin Stay Wires for W28 - 1/4" Sailbryte wire with swaged toggle and swaged eye on other end - please specify length 175.00 pair
Boomkin Stay Wires for W32 - 9/32" Sailbryte wire with swaged toggle and swaged eye on other end - please specify length 205.00 pair

Section A-10
BOOMKIN CROSSPIECE FAILURE ON WESTSAIL 32

The early Westsail 32s had a wooden crosspiece on the boomkin, with a U bolt to hold the backstay. This wood must be carefully checked for rot and cracking that could let the U bolt pull out. If you still have the wooden crosspiece, then I would highly recommend replacing it with a metal one. A recent failure, with the subsequent need to replace the mast, was the 3/8" bolt holding the upper tang to the crosspiece, as this is the weak point in the entire standing rigging system. The U bolt in this case had also broken on one leg inside the wood, and was only holding on by one of the 1/4" legs.

Westsail then made a stainless crosspiece with a 2" web. Some of the 2" x 2" stainless crosspieces have bent up slightly, but we have not heard of a failure of one of this design. You might want to have a reinforcement piece welded to the vertical part of the angle as a reinforcement, especially if you are heading offshore.

The current design has a 4" vertical web, with a reinforcing bar below the backstay ear, and two ears to hold the boomkin stays. We do have this 2" x 4" stainless crosspiece available as a replacement. The top and aft face are not at 90 degrees like the original stainless ones Westsail made, but at 82 degrees. This is because when used in conjunction with the stainless boomkin I make, and since the boomkin rises up at 8 degrees, this puts the aft face perpendicular to the waterline. This permits a windvane to be mounted directly on the aft face, and be perpendicular with the water. When used in conjunction with a wooden boomkin, it is necessary to cut the aft face of the wood to match. You may also have to drill out holes to mount it to your wood boomkin.

Also carefully check the wood on the boomkin itself for signs of rot or cracks, especially on the end under the metal crosspiece, and around the bolts holding them to the deck. Check the attachment bolts for signs of bending, or movement of the boomkin forward along the deck. If you want to build a new wooden boomkin, use clear fir lumber, and saturate it with at least two coats of epoxy resin after building it and drilling all of the holes.

To replace the wooden boomkin, we have designed a stainless steel pipe frame boomkin, consisting of 1-1/4" ID pipes, and a stainless crosspiece with a 4" vertical web. There are hull pads on the ends which bolt to the hull sides, just below the rubrail, with backup washers inside the lazarette. Contact bud@westsail.com for information on this all stainless steel boomkin replacement.

Section A-10 Price List - Boomkin Crosspiece

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Boomkin Crosspiece for W32 - 2" x 4" SS $  275.00 each

Section A-11
BOWSPRIT ATTACHMENT AND STAYSAIL EYEBOLT

In order to control the headstay tension (the key to upwind performance), the headstay must be sufficiently tight so it will not move. The key to this is the eyeband staying in one place and only one place. If the whiskers, bobstay or bowsprit are loose, there can be movement. If there is 2,000 lbs. load on the headstay, there is close to 6,500 lbs. load on the bobstay. Add the 1,500 lbs. on the whiskerstays, the compression on the bowsprit is near 10,000 lbs. That load is taken by three 1/2" bronze bolts that go through the bowsprit and deck. It is possible that the wood can creep aft on the bolts under the tension, and that the rig is losing tension. We have talked to people who have pulled the bowsprit bolts and found them to resemble a bent letter S. The 1/2" bronze eyebolt holding the staysail stay has broken on a number of occasions that I know of. The stemplate that attaches to this eyebolt and the stem of the boat has also broken on the bend, if there is any slight movement of the bowsprit. This piece should also be carefully inspected very frequently. I would recommend replacing the bolts with stainless steel, as well as a stainless steel eyebolt.

The bowsprit stay tangs and wires should also be inspected. They do not get the loading that the boomkin stays receive, but there is always the possibility of crevice corrosion in these fittings.

As a replacement for the wooden bowsprit for a Westsail 28 or 32, we have available a bowsprit made from stainless steel box section tubing, with tubes welded in place for the attachment bolts to fit through. This bowsprit is made from tubing that is 4" square, with a .120" wall, with end plates welded on, and the eyeband welded to the end. Since it is a direct replacement for the wooden bowsprit, you can use your existing platform, anchor rollers, staysail pedestal, and staysail eyebolt.

Section A-11 Price List - Bowsprit Attachment and Staysail Eyebolt

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Bow Whisker Stay Wires - W32 - 3/16" Sailbryte wire with swaged eye and toggle ends. Specify length (pair) $  150.00 pair
Staysail Eyebolt - 1/2" x 6" SS 55.00 each
Bowsprit Stem Fitting - with reinforcing brace and fasteners, Specify dimension from bend to first hole. This has varied on boats. 90.00 each
Bow Whisker Stay Tangs - (W28/W32) 1-1/2" wide with fasteners (pair) 100.00 pair
Bow Whisker Stay Wires - W28 - 3/16" Sailbryte wire with swaged eye and toggle ends. Specify length (pair) 150.00 pair

Section A-12
BOBSTAY WIRE FAILURES

Another stay that should be checked at least once a year is the bobstay, primarily the end down at the waterline. The lower end should have a toggle strap on it, however Westsail did use a swaged fork fitting on many of them. The fork corrodes due to electrolysis, and hairline cracks develop on the swaged fitting. A replacement bobstay is available of Sailbryte wire with new fittings swaged on both ends. The whisker stays and hull tangs for the bowsprit never seem to have any problems, but they should be checked in any event as a precaution. Keep a zinc attached to the bobstay hull fitting to protect against electrolysis.

On the Westsail 32 there can be as much as a 2,000 lbs. load on the headstay, and there can be close to 6,500 lbs. load on the bobstay. It does take a good wire to handle this load. We have seen some boats with a chain for the bobstay, however the chain cannot withstand these high loads without deforming, and possibly breaking. I also talked to an owner recently that said he experienced electrolysis between the galvanized chain and the stainless steel bobstay fitting in the hull. The stainless fitting lost out, and the hole broke out on the fitting.


Section A-12 Price List - Bobstay Wire Failures

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Westsail 28 Bobstay Wire with Swaged End Fittings - 5/16" Sailbryte wire with a 5/8" marine eye on upper end, and a 5/8" toggle on the lower end. Should be 6'- 9", but please check the length. $  155.00 each
Westsail 32 Bobstay Wire with Swaged End Fittings - 3/8" Sailbryte wire with a 5/8" marine eye on upper end, and a 5/8" toggle on the lower end. Should be 8'- 5", but please check the length. 185.00 each
Westsail 42/43 Bobstay Wire with Swaged End Fittings - 7/16" Sailbryte wire with a 3/4" marine eye on upper end, and a 3/4" toggle on the lower end. Should be 9'- 0", but please check the length. 295.00 each

Section A-13
RUNNING BACKSTAYS

The primary use of the running backstays is to steady the mast when using a staysail and reefed main, without a jib up. Under these condition, the mast can pump forward where the staysail attaches if it does not have the aft staying of the running backs. This condition causes the staysail stay to go very slack, and the windward performance suffers, and under extreme conditions, could cause buckling of the mast.

Most masts that Westsail supplied are already equipped with a pair of tangs on each side of the mast, near the tang for the staysail stay. Sometimes this is a single tang on each side instead of a pair on each side. This is used for attaching the upper end of the backstay wire. If your mast does not have these, I can supply them. They attach to the mast with a 1/2" bolt thru the mast, and the spreader lift tangs are usually also attached to the same bolt.

The lower end of the tackle is usually attached to a tang on the stanchion attachment bolt on the inside of the bulwark by the cabin back. There is also a padeye installed on the inside of the bulwark near the aft lower shrouds to attach the backstay tackle when not being used.

The backstays themselves are 3/16" stainless steel flexible wire for the Westsail 28 and Westsail 32, vinyl coated, with an eye or a thimble swaged to the upper end to attach to the mast, and an eye swaged to the lower end where the block is attached. The backstays for the Westsail 42/43 are 1/4" vinyl coated wire. The tackle consists of two stainless steel fiddle blocks, with 40' of 7/16" braided dacron line on each one. The lower fiddle blocks have a snap shackle and a cam cleat.

Please specify if you have a single tang, or a pair of tangs, on each side of the mast.


Section A-13 Price List - Running Backstays

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Running Backstay Wires for Westsail 28 - 22' x 3/16" vinyl coated wire with end fittings. (sold as a pair) $  150.00 pair
Running Backstay Blocks for W28 - Two sets of blocks, line, lower tangs and padeyes for W28. (sold as a pair) 390.00 pkg
Running Backstay Wires for Westsail 32 - 28' x 3/16" vinyl coated wire with end fittings. (sold as a pair) 150.00 pair
Running Backstay Blocks for W32 - Two sets of blocks, line, lower tangs and padeyes for W32. (sold as a pair) 415.00 pkg
Running Backstay Wires for Westsail 42/43 - 37' x 1/4" vinyl coated wire with end fittings. (sold as a pair) 240.00 pair
Running Backstay Blocks for W42/43 - Two sets of blocks, line, lower tangs and padeyes for W42/43. (sold as a pair) 530.00 pkg
Mast Tangs and Bolt - if neeeded (Contact Us)
Terms: - 50% deposit with order, balance COD, plus shipping (+ sales tax in CA)

Section A-14
FURLING GEAR

Furling gear has now been perfected to the point that it is nearly foolproof, and can be used as a temporary reefing system for the headsail, as well as for furling the sail. There are many good brands on the market, but I would recommend two of the top rated ones, Profurl and Harken. Profurl uses a round foil on the stay, in approximately 7' sections, and is used by most of the round the world sailors. Harken uses an airfoil shaped tube, also in 7' long sections.

For the W28 I would recommend the Profurl Model C 350 or the Harken Cruising Unit #1. For the W32 I would recommend the Profurl Model C 350 or the Harken Cruising Unit #1. For the W42 or W43, the Profurl Model C 420.

The Profurl Model C 350 has a single groove, as does the Harken Cruising Unit #1. The Model C 420 has two grooves, so that a sail change can be made with one still up, or you can run two sails on the foil at the same time when sailing downwind. All of these units should include the long link plates to keep the drum just above the turnbuckle, so that the foot of the sail does not interfere with the pulpit.

The headstay on the W28 is about 38', on the W32 about 44', the W42 standard mast about 53', and the W42 tall mast, about 58'. The Profurl C 350 has a standard maximum length of 47'. The standard Harken Cruising Unit #1 has a maximum foil length of 53'. The Profurl C 420 standard system has a maximum length of 60'.

To install any of these units on the headstay, the lower end fitting needs to be a swaged stud that will slip through the foil, and screw directly into the turnbuckle body. Since most boats have a marine eye swaged on the lower end, and the headstay probably is the original ones, I would recommend installing a new headstay when installing the furling system. You would need to take the measurement of the stay to the end of the threaded stud in the turnbuckle. Or take the measurement of the overall length including the turnbuckle, and I can adjust the length accordingly if I know the brand of turnbuckle you are using.

I saw a furler that I was really impressed with at a recent Northwest Westsail rendezvous. It was on Steve van Tuyl's Westsail 32, and he has had it for over a year and is extremely well pleased with the unit. The big advantage is that it can be installed over an existing stay without removal of the stay, except for installing the drum at the bottom. No need to go aloft to remove the stay or replace the eye fitting at the lower end. It has sheeves at the top of the foil, and the halyard comes back down the foil, so there is no load on an upper swivel.

I checked with the manufacturer, and can get them at a good price. You can check it out at www.alado.com. The Model A3 is the one he used for the headstay, which is 9/32" wire. The Model A2 could be used for the staysail on the W32, which is priced much lower, but the stay would have to be replaced with one of 1/4" wire. This would be ideal for the W28, which has 1/4" stays. You can contact Steve if you are interested at ironworks@localaccess.com. The also have larger units suitable for the Westsail 42 and 43.

Section A-15
REEFING KIT

For the leech end of the mainsail reefing, two cheek blocks can be can be installed on one side of the mainboom, and two padeyes installed opposite side. 3/8" braided dacron line is spliced onto the padeyes, and the line runs up through the aft reefing ring on the sail, then down through the cheek block, and forward along the boom. The aft lower reef line should be 32' long, and the upper reef line should be 44' long.

Fairleads should be installed on the boom to contain the lines, and keep them from drooping and tangling. A winch can be installed on the side of the boom near the front end to pull in the reefs, and two camlocks installed to hold the lines while freeing up the winch to pull in the other reef.

The clew blocks should be installed so that the reefing line assumes a 45 degree angle down and aft for the clews. Locate the reefing winch on the boom at a convenient position, and mount the cam cleats, with the locking cams facing away from the winch to handle the reefing lines, as they are used while freeing up the winch to pull in the next line. Mount the cams and fairleads for the lower reef low on the boom, and for the upper reef high on the boom, so that the lines do not cross.

To hold the reef on the luff of the sail, two 3/8" braided lines should be made up, with a padeye for the fixed end, and camcleats attached to the mast to hold the other end of each reef line. The lower reef line should be 16', and the upper reef line should be 28'.

SINGLE LINE REEFING

A single line reefing system can also be set up. Mount a padeye and a cheek block opposite each other on the boom. Use one pair for each reef point, near the forward end for the tack, and at a 45 degree angle down and aft for the clews. Locate a reefing winch on the boom at a convenient position, and mount camcleats on either side of the winch, with the locking cams facing away from the winch. The short line is for the lower reef, and it should be tied to the aft padeye, go up thru the lower reef clew, then back down thru the cheek block opposite the padeye. The line then runs forward along the boom in fairleads, thru a camcleat, past the winch and thru another camcleat, then thru a cheek block, up thru the lower reef tack, then back down to the padeye opposite the cheek block, and tied off. There should be only enough slack in the line to get a turn around the winch.

The long line is used for the upper reef, and is installed the same as the lower one, with the padeyes and cheek blocks in the appropriate positions. The lower reef line should be 45', and the upper 70'.

To operate the single line reef, pull the clew line first, wrap it around the winch, then pull up the boom until the reef ring is close to the boom, and lock the line in the camcleat. Free up the winch, and wrap the other end of the same line around the winch, loosen the halyard, and pull down the tack ring until it is close to the boom. The second reef is taken in the same way as the first one. With different colored lines, you should not have a problem figuring out what line does what function.

Section A-15 Price List - Reefing Kit

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Clew Reefing Kit for Main Boom - W32 - cheek blocks, 3/8" lines, fairleads, camcleats $  195.00 pkg
Luff Reefing Kit - W32 - 3/8" lines, cleats, padeyes 60.00 pkg
Single Line Reefing - W32 - 3/8" lines, cheek blocks, camcleats, fairleads, padeyes 285.00 pkg

Section A-16
REPLACEMENT WINCH PARTS

Good news for owners with Barlow and Barient winches. Most of the Westsail boats came equipped with either Barlow or Barient winches as standard equipment, and unfortunately both companies are no longer in business. The good news is that replacement parts may be available for both of these fine lines of winches.

There is a company in Australia that does have some replacement parts for these lines of winches. You can contact them by email to purchase parts, duplicate worn gears, and even purchase castings in order to replace worn or broken parts. The company is Australian Yacht Winch Co., and their website address is www.arco-winches.com and then click on "spare parts".

Replacement pawls and springs are also available from Lewmar.

If you want to install new winches on the Westsail 28 or 32, the top plate of the bracket may not be large enough to accommodate the hole pattern of the new winch, however the bracket is sturdy enough to handle larger winches. To solve the problem, I have made up 3/16" thick round plates to accommodate the larger winches. We can weld these plates to the top of the existing bracket, or bolt them on. To bolt them on, we drill countersunk holes to match the existing hole pattern on the bases, and also a set of holes to accommodate the new larger hole pattern of the winches. These plates are bolted down to the brackets with flathead bolts and locknuts, with the other bolts sticking up to be able to mount the winch. I would need to know the hole spacing you currently have on the brackets, and the hole spacing of the new winches, so that they could be drilled and countersunk for flat head bolts.

I have also made up new winch brackets if needed, I would need to know the hole spacing of the winches you plan to use.

I have also worked out an arrangement with the factory rep for Lewmar winches to obtain them at a good discount. Contact me for sizes and pricing.

Section A-16 Price List - Replacement Winch Parts

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Adapter Plates for Larger Winches - one pair with fasteners. (Contact Us)
New Winch Brackets with Fasteners - Please specify the winches with which they will be used. (sold as a pair) 450.00 pair
Lewmar Winches - (Contact Us)

Section A-17
BOOM VANG AND PREVENTER

To properly control and adjust the shape of the mainsail, a boom vang is almost a necessity. The system consists of a four part block and tackle with snap shackles and a cam cleat on the lower block, and is attached from a boom bail to down on deck. The deck location can either be on the aft side of the base of the mast for a single point attachment, or on the aft lower chainplates on both sides for a dual attachment. The main advantage for the dual attachment is that it better controls the shape of the mainsail, and also serves as a preventer to hold the boom in the event of a jibe. The disadvantage is that it must be slacked off before tacking, moved to the opposite side after the tack, and then re-tightened. The center position aft of the mast needs only to be slacked off before tacking, then re-tightened after the tack.

The boom bail should be located 7' to 8' aft of the mast. A 1/2" hole is drilled in the boom, and a compression tube cut about 1/16" wider than the boom. The bail is installed with a 5/16" bolt and locknut, then the excess threads cut off.

For the single point attachment, use a deck pad on the mast step just behind the mast. This can be attached with long self-tapping screws, or with long 1/4" bolts, washers, and cap nuts.

For the dual point attachment, use two 1/2" stainless steel D shackles on the aft chainplates. Loosen the aft lower turnbuckles, pull out the pin holding them to the chainplates, and replace the pin with the shackle with the loop of the shackle facing aft. Wire the shackle pin shut with a piece of stainless safety wire.


Section A-17 Price List - Boom Vang

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Boom Vang Tackle Kit - Consists of a pair of fiddle blocks with snap shackles and cam locks with 45' of 7/16" braided line spliced on, boom bail, (2) 1/2" D shackles, W28/W32 $  230.00 pkg
Boom Vang Only - Consists of a pair of fiddle blocks with snap shackles and cam locks with 45' of 7/16" braided dacron line spliced on, W28/W32 195.00 pkg
Bail with Compression Tube, Bolt and Locknut - specify width of boom 25.00 pkg
Deck Pad with Fasteners - specify type of fastening 15.00 each
1/2" Stainless Steel D Shackles - pair to attach to aft lower chainplates 30.00 pair

Section A-18
CRUISING SPINNAKERS

The cruising, or poleless spinnaker, has proven to be an excellent sail to help your boat move in light winds. It is easy to handle, and without the necessity of a pole, can be easily handled with only two people aboard.

The tack of the sail is connected to the end of the bowsprit with a 3 to 1 purchase vang with snap shackles. This lets you tighten the luff when reaching, and also lets the tack rise up when running to get a fuller shape to the sail. The vang line is tied off on the sampson post, or onto a cleat on the foredeck.

I always recommend a tube type snuffer for the sail that collapses the sail into a long tube with a ring at the lower end. The upper end of the tube, with the sail inside, is hoisted up with the halyard and secured. There is a small line attached to the ring and it runs up to a block at the top of the tube. As the ring is raised up to the top, the sail is released, and the ring and tube remain above the head of the sail while it is in use. To douse the sail, simply ease off the clew and tack, and pull the ring down with the small line to collapse the sail into the tube, then lower the whole tube down to the deck.

Usually only one sheet is used, and it is lead thru a block on the stern for reaching, and thru a block on the end of the boom for running. To tack the boat, snuff the sail into the tube, carry the sheet around to the other side of the boat, then raise the ring to open the sail again. Once you get the system working, it is really very simple to use.

For the Westsail 32, our experience has shown that if you want to use the sail to keep the boat moving in very light winds, say 3 to 10 knots, use 3/4 oz. cloth, with a tri-radial head and about 900 square feet of area. If you prefer to motor in very light winds, and will be using the sail for reaching and running in 5 to 15 knots of wind, have the sail made of 1.2 oz. fabric instead, with a slightly flatter cut for reaching. In any stronger wind, this is simply too much sail area for the boat.

For the Westsail 42 and 43, we recommend a sail area of 2000 to 2400 square feet, using 1.5 oz. fabric.

Section A-18 Price List - Cruising Spinnaker

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
W-32 Cruising Spinnaker - 900 sq.ft. - 3/4 or 1.2 oz. - choice of colors (Contact Kern Sails)
Snuffer Tube for Spinnaker - (Contact ATN)
Downhaul Vang - with 3 to 1 purchase blocks with snap shackles and 3/8" line spliced on 150.00 pkg
Spinnaker Bail Strap - for masthead 40.00 each
Single Block with Swivel - for spinnaker halyard 35.00 each
Spinnaker Halyard - 7/16" x 100' braided dacron with quick release shackle spliced on 75.00 each

Section A-19
MAST SUPPORT PROBLEM ON WESTSAIL 32

A number of owners of Westsail 32s have complained of their rigging being continually loose after tightening it, and also of the fiberglass surface of the cabin top mast base being dished down. The cabin sole around the wood mast support post also has shown signs of being dished down.

The wooden mast support post is normally 1-3/4" wide, with the top cut back to about 1-3/4" fore and aft, and it must be checked to see if it has crushed into the underside of the deckbeam. The cabin top can push down with the load of the mast and rigging and crush the mast post up into the deckbeam. Additional evidence is the deckbeam trim at the upper corners of the cabin sides separated from the cabin side because the deckbeam has pushed the cabin side out. Also, the space under the cabin sole at the mast post should have solid blocking down to the top of the ballast. I have seen some boats where this blocking is loose, has gaps in it, or was never installed.

The main bulkhead is hidden behind the deckbeams, and it usually does not go all the way up to the fiberglass underside of the cabin top, but is about 1/2" shy of hitting the cabin top. The deckbeams were usually fastened with screws into the bulkhead, and these bend with the load. The beams should be bolted through the main bulkheads, as well as up through the cabin top. There are bolts put through the cabin top, and you can see the carriage bolt head on the cabin top, or on some boats, a countersunk flat head bolt. Usually no horizontal bolts were put in, but sometimes screws were used, but these are subject to bending, and will not support the load. If you have indications of the cabin top being pushed down, the fix is to loosen the rigging, jack up the deckbeam at the center with a hydraulic jack and a post, then put bolts horizontally through both deck beams to capture the bulkhead. The bolt holes should be drilled between the lower two laminations of the deck beams that are on either side of the main bulkhead. Drill four 5/16" holes on the port side, and one on the starboard side of the passageway door opening. Install the carriage bolts with the heads of the bolts in the main cabin, and the washers and capnuts in the head area and passageway. Slip a piece of brass or stainless steel into the gap between the deckbeam and the top of the mastpost, then remove the jack and re-tighten the rigging. Distributing the load onto the bulkheads with the bolts will prevent this problem.

The space under the cabin sole at the mast post should have solid blocking down to the top of the ballast. I have seen some boats where this blocking is loose, has gaps in it, does not extend far enough aft, or was never installed. If this is the case, fit some blocks in place and seal with epoxy.

To take care of the problem of a dished down fiberglass base on the cabintop, a fairly easy repair can be accomplished with the following procedure. Take the mast off, and remove the aluminum base on the cabintop. Carefully cut the fiberglass just inside the exterior line of the mast base with a router. Remove the fiberglass piece, and remove all of the soft plywood, possibly going all the way down to the fiberglass on the inside of the deck lamination if necessary. Saturate the area with epoxy resin. Build up the removed wood area with solid wood, saturated with epoxy resin, then stick the fiberglass piece back down. Fill the routed groove with epoxy putty. Now reinstall the aluminum mast base, and since it covers the groove, there will not be any gelcoat repair necessary.

Section A-19 Price List - Mast Support Problem on Westsail 32

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Mast Support Repair Hardware - Set of 5 stainless steel carriage bolts, capnuts, washers $  15.00 pkg

Section A-20
W32 MAINSHEET TRAVELER TRACK SYSTEM

I have had many inquiries regarding improving the sailing performance of the Westsail 32, and probably the most important area is the shape and control of the mainsail. With the standard block setup from the end of the boom to the boomkin, it is very difficult to take the twist out of the mainsail, even with the use of a boom vang. One good solution is to use a mainsheet traveler track across in front of the hatch, with a traveler car and control lines on either side to move the car and control the boom and sail shape.

I have been able to find a source of a very heavy web track, bent to a curve, with stainless steel adjustable riser bolted to the ends. This track is self-supporting across the top of the hatch, and is used on other boats with mainsails of even larger area on molded fiberglass deck risers. I have fitted it to the cabin top of many of the boats, and the track clears over the hatch. Depending on whether you have a fiberglass or wood hatch, you need to raise the track to clear over your hatch. The risers can be ordered in different heights to accommodate the hatch height.

The track risers are thru bolted to the cabin top just ahead of the hatch opening, and still permit a dodger to be installed just aft of it. There is a nylon ball bearing track car, controlled by a 4 to 1 purchase tackle on each side, with built-in cam cleats for the control lines. A ball bearing fiddle block with becket is used on the car, and three boom bails with blocks are installed on the boom. One is directly above the car, a second aft of it by 9" to 12", and a third ahead by the same amount. There is another single block at the gooseneck end of the main boom, a deck turning block at the base of the mast, and a cheek block by the forward corner of the main hatch. The mainsheet runs thru these ball bearing blocks, to a winch on the aft end of the cabin top, usually to starboard.

All lines are easily controlled from the bridge deck at the forward end of the cockpit, thereby clearing the aft deck from the congestion of the mainsheet. There is a need to have a winch on the cabin top to control the mainsheet, as with the midboom sheeting it is harder to pull in the mainsail. By sheeting in the sail, then pulling the control lines to move the car, the mainsail is easily controlled and shaped for optimum sailing performance. A dodger conversion is available to bring the control lines under a dodger if desired.

The traveler track is gray hardcoat anodized, with stainless steel blocks with ball bearing sheeves. I usually supply a complete package of all parts, including all fasteners and control lines. The only additional item needed would be a winch for the cabin top, and a mainsheet cleat. Individual parts are also available, if you want to use some of the existing parts you might already have aboard.

MAIN TRAVELER TRACK SYSTEM

Main Traveler and cam cleat ends
without dodger conversion

Dodger Conversion Eds


Cam Cleat Ends

Track and End Rizers

Section A-20 Price List - Mainsheet Traveler Track System

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Mainsheet Traveler Track System Complete - The price of the entire unit, with track and risers, boom bails, all necessary ball bearing blocks and control lines, specify track width, riser height, and cams cleats on the ends of the track or dodger conversion ends. $  1,390.00 pkg
Traveler Track System Parts - If you prefer, you can buy the individual parts: Traveler track, bent to fit, end caps, roller car, 4 to 1 controls, cam cleats and control lines or dodger conversion ends. 700.00 pkg
Traveler Track System Parts - Heavy duty risers only. (sold as a pair). Specify height. 350.00 pair
Traveler Track System Parts - Fiddle block with becket (ball bearing). Size 40 68.00 each
Traveler Track System Parts - Single blocks (ball bearing). Size 30 35.00 each
Traveler Track System Parts - Deck block (ball bearing). Size 30 40.00 each
Traveler Track System Parts - Cheek block. Size 30 36.00 each
Traveler Track System Parts - Boom bail with compression tube, bolt, locknut. Specify width of boom 25.00 pkg

Section A-21
MAST LOWERING WITH A TABERNACLE BASE

A majority of the Westsail 32s, and many of the 28s, were supplied with a tabernacle mast base, yet most owners have never attempted to lower their mast themselves. The procedure is not difficult, and as long as care is taken while doing it, it is a relatively safe and easy procedure, albeit somewhat scary the first time through.

The following procedure is written for the 32, although it is the same for the 28. If the present mainsheet arrangement consists of two blocks on the end bail of the boom, and two blocks mounted on the boomkin, then these can be used to lower the mast. The only change would be the necessity of lengthening the mainsheet. You will need a minimum of 125' of 7/16" line, and the standard W32 mainsheet is only 90' long. If your present sheeting arrangement is forward along the boom, then you will need to hang a fiddle block, (or two single blocks) on the end of the boom, and use a fiddle block with becket that will be attached onto the backstay ear attachment point. Make sure the line you use is at least 125' long.

As the mast is lowered forward, the boom is used as a guy pole, and the boom end will go up and forward, so it must be tied to prevent it from moving sideways. A 3/8" or 7/16" rope may be attached on each side from the end of the boom to the top of the turnbuckle for the upper shrouds. On most sets of rigging, the shrouds have an eye on the lower end, going into a toggle fork on the turnbuckle. This will serve as a pivot point for the upper shrouds that steady the mast as it is lowered, and it is just about in line with the pivot bolt on the mast tabernacle. Rotate the pin on the toggle end so that it is across the boat, so that the shroud will rotate forward without bending. Tie a line on each side, through the turnbuckle upper toggle end, and attached to the boom bail at the end of the boom, and tighten these up well. The turnbuckle top should also be held so it does not move fore or aft, so tie another short line on each of the two upper shroud turnbuckles from just below the boom guy rope to the lower toggle end of the lower shroud turnbuckles where they are attached to the chainplates. You can actually remove the aft lower shrouds now, and attach the after line directly to the hole in the aft chainplates. You now have secured the shroud pivot points for lowering the mast.

If your turnbuckles are the type that have a threaded stud swaged to the wire that screws directly into the turnbuckle barrel, then this procedure just described will not work for you. In lieu of this, you can lash a ring or a shackle to the upper shroud wire, in line with the mast pivot bolt, and use this ring as the pivot point. It will mean that the shroud wire will have to bend at this point to lower the mast, and as long as the ring is not too close to the stud end, the shroud wire should take the bend without kinking.

Since the topping lift is used to support the entire weight of the mast as it is lowered, make sure it is well fastened and in good condition. As a safety measure, take the main halyard and attach its end to the top of the boom end and secure it as a safety line, thereby doubling the topping lift. Lash a board across the top of the bow pulpit for the mast to rest against when it is lowered. Make sure the electrical wire coming out of the mast will not be pinched, and there are no other obstructions to the mast being lowered, such as an open forward hatch or some obstruction ahead of the boat, like overhead electrical wires on the dock. The top of the W32 mast will project about 28 feet in front of the bow pulpit when it is lowered, and end up about 10 feet above the deck.

To make the job of moving the mast after it is lowered easier, a roller support should be put onto the bow pulpit. One can easily be made using a 2 x 4 across the bow pulpit, with cleats on the underside to lock it into the pulpit rails. Attach a V shaped boat trailer roller to the top of the board, and pad the support brackets. Using this, the mast can be easily pulled back.

Loosen and remove the backstay turnbuckle, and the aft lower shrouds if you have not done so already, and the mast is now ready to lower. The rest of the shrouds can stay in place, as well as all of the halyards. If you have a roller furling headstay, it should be removed and led back to prevent it from kinking. Tie a single block on one of the aft mooring cleats, and take the 120' line and bring it forward through the single block to one of the jib sheet winches, and secure it with a few feet of slack in the line. Pull on the forestay to tip the mast slightly forward, until the strain is taken by the mainsheet. Now ease the mainsheet out, keeping at lease two turns on the winch as a safety. Be careful not to tangle any of the shrouds as the mast is being lowered, and that the wiring is not being pinched. Once the mast is resting on the board across the bow pulpit, the shrouds can then be bundled up.

At this point, the boom can be unrigged and lowered down by releasing one of the side guy ropes. If you decide to pull the pivot pin and remove the mast entirely, remember that more of the mast projects ahead of the pulpit than is between the base and the pulpit, so the mast will want to tip up at the base. Support it well, then spray WD-40 on the pin, and tap on it with a punch. Do not hammer on the pin directly, as it will mushroom the end and the pin will not come out. If it is still frozen, you might need to heat it with a small propane torch. As a last resort, remove the tabernacle base from the boat, or cut the pin just inside the mast with a hacksaw.

If you have had to cut the pin or the tube to remove it, I can supply you with new ones. The old tube can be cut just inside the mast on both sides. The new tube is cut to fit inside the mast, and prevents the walls of the mast from moving together, and can be secured in place with epoxy putty. When reinstalling the pin, coat it liberally with anti-seize compound for easy removal in the future. Remove and clean the masthead sheaves, then lubricate with a white grease so they operate smoothly.

Re-stepping the mast can be accomplished by reversing the procedure, but you must take special care while raising the mast that the rigging does not get tangled. It usually takes a couple of people to keep all of the wires straight, while another cranks on the winch.

Section A-21 Price List - Mast Lowering with Tabernacle Base

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
New Tabernacle Pin and Tube - for Westsail 32 $  45.00 pkg
New Tabernacle Bolt and locknut - for Westsail 28, 5/8" x 6-1/2" 12.00 pkg
Complete Mast Tabernacle Conversion Kit - to change standard mast. Specify size and manufacturer of mast. 575.00 pkg
7/16" Low Stretch Braided Line 0.60 foot
Pair of Fiddle Blocks - one with becket, with snap shackles, Size 30. (sold as a pair) 130.00 pair

Section A-22
TABERNACLE MAST BASE CONVERSION

If you have the standard fixed base on you Westsail 28 or 32 mast, and want to convert to a tabernacle base, I do have the tabernacle mast base kit available.

A welded aluminum tabernacle base is supplied to replace the existing fixed base, and the mast conversion is a bolt-on assembly, and does not require welding on the mast. The bottom of the mast must be cut with a radius on the forward side, and holes drilled for the tube and bolts. Reinforcing plates are supplied to be bolted on each side of the mast, and the tube inserted and cut to the correct length, slightly longer than the width of the mast with the reinforcing plates. The base should be bolted on to the cabin top, and a hole drilled with a plastic tube installed for the wires to come through, unless the existing one can be used. Use a good grade non-seize compound on the stainless pin when it is installed in the aluminum tube when you step the mast.


Section A-22 Price List - Tabernacle Mast Base Conversion

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Complete Mast Tabernacle Conversion Kit - for Westsail 32. Specify size of mast. $  575.00 pkg

Section A-23
BOOM GOOSENECKS

SLIDING GOOSENECKS

If the gooseneck you have is one of the early ones, and it slides to be able to raise the boom slightly, it also was originally designed to set the mainsail without a winch. You can raise the sail with the halyard, let the boom go to the top of its track, then cleat the halyard. The boom can then be pulled down with a two part tackle attached to the bottom of the gooseneck to adjust the tightness on the luff of the mainsail. If you do not want to use this system, then fix the slide in place by replacing two of the flathead bolts in the track with hex bolts, to trap the slide in a suitable location.

REPLACEMENT GOOSENECKS

I have been able to find replacement goosenecks for the various mast and boom combinations that were used on the Westsail boats. If you have a broken gooseneck part, send it to me, or make a good drawing, and I will try to get a replacement.


Section A-24
W32 SAIL PLAN


Section A-25
LAZYJACKS ON WESTSAIL 28 AND 32


Complete lazyjack kit including padeyes, plastic blocks, cheek blocks, cleats,
3/8" braided dacron line spliced to padeyes and blocks, and fasteners.

Section A-25 Price List - Lazyjacks on Westsail 28 and 32

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Lazyjack Kit - Westsail 28 $  185.00 pkg
Lazyjack Kit - Westsail 32 195.00 pkg

Section B-01
WOODEN BOWSPRIT DELAMINATION AND DRY ROT

On the W28 and W32 the bowsprits were made from laminated strips of fir or mahogany, with 3 to 5 vertical laminations, and glued with resorcinol or brown powder glue. After this many years, the glue usually breaks down, and the boards separate slightly, allowing rainwater to get inside, and usually permitting dry rot to get started. A sharp pocket knife pushed in around any openings and all fittings should disclose and soft wood in the bowsprit.

Another potential problem spot is where the eyeband is attached to the end of the bowsprit. Water gets in behind the fitting, and rot starts. If you have not done so previously, the eyeband should be removed and the wood under it checked for condition. Remove the four screws, and tap on the ears to rotate and free up the eyeband. The staysail eyebolt should be removed and checked for soundness and rot around the hole. Also check around the anchor roller plates on the sides of the bowsprit.

If the wood is still sound, with no signs of dry rot, then scrape off all of the varnish or paint from the top and bottom, and the ends. Seal the wood with at least two coats of saturating epoxy resin, such as "West System" epoxy, or "Git Rot" penetrating epoxy, including all of the holes for mounting the rollers and platform. If there are still some open seams in the wood, add some filler to the epoxy to make a paste, and force this mixture into the seams to seal them. Reinstall the eyeband and staysail eyebolt with a good grade of marine caulking, then varnish or paint over the resin.

If you have to replace the bowsprit, we would suggest making it out of one piece of fir, or at most two pieces, with just one vertical seam. Use epoxy resin to glue the joint, and seal the wood and all holes with two coats of saturating epoxy resin before varnishing or painting.

As a replacement for the wooden bowsprit for a Westsail 28 or 32, we have available a bowsprit made from stainless steel box section tubing, with tubes welded in place for the attachment bolts to fit through. This bowsprit is made from tubing that is 4" square, with a .120" wall, with end plates welded on, and the eyeband welded to the end. Since it is a direct replacement for the wooden bowsprit, you can use your existing platform, anchor rollers, staysail pedestal, and staysail eyebolt. Stainless steel sampson posts can also be welded onto the bowsprit, and do not need to go through the deck.

Section B-02
STAINLESS STEEL BOX BOWSPRIT

As a replacement for the wooden bowsprit for a Westsail 28 or 32, I have available a bowsprit made from stainless steel box section tubing, with tubes welded in place for the attachment bolts to fit through. This bowsprit is made from tubing that is 4" square, with a .120" wall, with end plates welded on, and the eyeband welded to the end. The bowsprit is electropolished after fabrication.

Since it is a direct replacement for the wooden bowsprit, you can use your existing platform, anchor rollers, staysail pedestal, and staysail eyebolt. I have attached a drawing of the Westsail 28 or 32 bowsprit, with the locations of the bolts per the original specifications from Westsail. Since most of the boats have slightly different locations of the mounting bolts, use the drawing and measure all of the marked locations from your boat. Note the differences and changes on the drawing. All dimensions are taken from the aft side of the eyeband. If you have any other parts attached to the bowsprit, note their location, and size of the mounting bolts, and I will have tubes welded in place, or a reinforcement plate welded on that you can drill or tap to bolt on the fitting.

Tubes are welded through the bowsprit for all of the bolts. I use 5/8" ID tubing for all of the 1/2" bolts, to allow for a little leeway in the installation, but you might have to ream out some of the holes in the wood to make the final fit. Some of the W28s used 3/8" threaded rods to attach the platform, and I have increased these to 1/2" for rigidity.

Since anchor windlasses are different on most boats, we usually weld plates onto the bowsprit to fit the windlass. On some the left side bolts are in the bowsprit, but we can tap the plates for the bolts. The right side bolts are handled with holes through the plates that take a nut. You will need accurate measurements of the location of the mounting holes for the windlass, and where it is located on the bowsprit. We can also weld on stainless sampson to the bowsprit that do not go through the deck.

Remove the eyeband from your existing bowsprit, send it to me, and I will use it in making up this new bowsprit. As an alternative, we can weld a tube on the end of the bowsprit, and you can slip your eyeband over it. For the W28, I will also need the metal cap from the base of the bowsprit. We can also make up a stainless angled box base to replace the wooden riser piece under the bowsprit.

New mounting bolts and 1/2" threaded rod for the platform, and nuts and washers are supplied with the new bowsprit. The long mounting bolts will be hex head stainless steel instead of the original bronze carriage bolts used on the wooden bowsprit. The threaded rod for the pedestal was 3/4" on most boats, and can be reused if it is not bent, or if you need a new piece, let me know the length. If you do not have a pedestal, or have a design different from the 3/4" threaded rod, let me know.

Because of the length of the bowsprit, shipping will have to be by truck. Shipping to the East Coast is usually about $170.00.

W28 SS Box Bowsprit

W32 SS Box Bowsprit

W32 SS Box Bowsprit

W32 SS Box Bowsprit with Base


W32 SS Box Bowsprit w/ Sampson Posts

Section B-02 Price List - Stainless Steel Box Bowsprit

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Stainless Box Bowsprit - with bolts, threaded rod, washers, nuts $  1,295.00 pkg
Pipe on End of Bowsprit - if you do not send me your eyeband to weld on 40.00 each
Angled Box Base - if you do not want to use your wooden riser pieces 100.00 each
Stainless Steel Sampson Posts - welded on to bowsprit. They do not go through the deck. 250.00 pair
1/2" X 6" SS Staysail Eyebolt - with washer and nut 55.00 each
Bowsprit Stem Fitting - with reinforcing brace. Specify dimension from bend to first hole. 90.00 pkg

Section B-03
WESTSAIL 32 STAINLESS STEEL PIPE BOWSPRIT

I have had a number of inquiries regarding the stainless steel tubular pipe frame bowsprit for the Westsail 32, so I thought I would describe how it is built, and let you know the costs.

The bowsprit consists of 1-1/4" ID pipe, which is 1-5/8" OD, that is bent around and has pads that bolt to the hull just below the rubrail, with backup washers inside the hull. There are also two additional hull pads welded to the angle frame that bolt thru teak wedges near the bow. There is a framework of 2" stainless angle across the bowsprit that supports the platform and the two large plastic anchor rollers with stainless steel tube bushings, and a welded ear for the headstay and bobstay connection. The bowsprit sits lower than the wooden one, and the existing headstay needs lengthening. Toggles are included to provide the needed length to have enough take-up in the turnbuckle. A forestay chainplate is provided that fits the same holes as the existing plate. All mounting bolts and backup washers are provided. All stainless steel parts are either hand buffed and polished, or are electropolished in a chemical solution.

The pulpit fits into sockets welded to the bowsprit pipe, and is removable. The pulpit is about twice the length of the original Westsail pulpit, and has an intermediate rail for added strength. The lifelines will have to be shortened to fit the pulpit attachment points. Plates are welded on for running light attachments.

The teak platform consists of 13/16" thick teak boards fitted and bolted to holes in the angle bracing. The platform is at about the same level as the bow caprail.

The new bowsprit with its long pulpit gives a much better working area, and closes up the gap behind the existing pulpit and platform. Without the wooden end of the bowsprit on deck, the bow area is much easier to work around. There is no worry of rot, and a minimum of maintenance.

Drawings and instructions are available showing the installation, and I also have pictures of this bowsprit installed on other Westsail 32s.

STAINLESS STEEL PIPE BOWSPRIT

SS Pipe Bowsprit - Top View

SS Pipe Bowsprit - Side View


W32 Bowsprit and Pulpit

Section B-03 Price List - Westsail 32 Stainless Steel Tubular Bowsprit

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Stainless Steel Bowsprit Frame - double rail pulpit, sockets welded to frame, running light plates, 2 plastic anchor rollers, hull mounting pads, forestay chainplate, all fasteners, installation instructions $  3,750.00 pkg
Teak Platform Strips - cut, fitted, drilled, and bullnosed, and ready to be bolted to frame, with fasteners (Contact Us)
Terms: - 50% deposit with order, balance COD, plus shipping ( sales tax in CA). Approximate shipping cost to East Coast by truck is $200.00. A crate must be built to ship the bowsprit, and that adds to the cost.

Section B-04
STAINLESS STEEL BOWSPRIT INSTALLATION

SS BOX BOWSPRIT INSTALLATION

When installing the box bowsprit, set it in place on top of the riser board and temporarily put a bolt through the sampson posts and loosely install the staysail eyebolt. If they line up, then tie a string line from the end of the bowsprit to the mast. This string should go down the center of the bowsprit. You might want to attach the whisker stays to line up the bowsprit. Align the riser board, you will probably have to put a 1/2" drill bit down the three holes in the bowsprit, riser board and deck to make sure they line up. Install these three bolts first, and then the sampson post bolt, and the staysail eyebolt. Attach the headstay and bobstay, and tighten all four turnbuckles. Install the anchor rollers, and then install the platform and bow pulpit. Cut the threaded rod to the necessary lengths so the ends of the rods do not extend beyond the sides of the platform. You can then install a windlass to the plates welded to the bowsprit.

SS PIPE BOWSPRIT INSTALLATION

The wooden bowsprit and sampson posts can be removed completely, and a teak board installed over the holes with a windlass installed. Alternatively, the wooden bowsprit can be cut off just ahead of the sampson posts, or in front of the anchor windlass if one is mounted on top of the bowsprit.

The stemplate should be removed from the bow, and the new one fitted. Install the new forestay chainplate on the stem. The holes should line up with the stemplate that was removed. If they do not, then you have one of the Westsails built using a different stemplate than most of the boats. Either redrill the holes in the hull, or send the stemplate back marked with masking tape and ink lines for your hole location, and I will have a special one made up. Caulk and install in place.

The platform boards should be removed if they have already been fitted, and the bowsprit fitted up into place with the end sockets and hull plates on loosely. It can be tied and adjusted with three halyards; one on the forward end and one on each side of the pulpit at the lifeline attachment loops. Pull the aft end up so the hull plates, with the ears up, are hard up against the rubrail, and the bowsprit has the proper rake. You must visually check the rake to see it is correct. Make sure the bowsprit is level athwartships, or trim the underside of the rubrails if necessary, then drill the four 3/8" holes on each side. Caulk the hull plates, and bolt in place with 3/8" x 1-1/2" carriage bolts with backup washers on the inside.

Attach the headstay, using the chainplate extender on the turnbuckle, and the bobstay. Attach the forestay, using the chainplate extender. Re-adjust the bowsprit rake as necessary. Use the 13/16" teak blocks to build up, and trim as necessary, to go between the welded plates and the bow on each side. Drill, caulk and thrubolt with long 3/8" carriage bolts, with backup washers inside.

Drill thru the aft ends of the bowsprit tubes with a 1/4" drill for the locking bolts, and install a 1/4" bolt with locknut on each side.

Set the platform boards in place, and trim the aft ends to clear the hull. Before bolting down, check to see that your anchor clears in the slot ahead of the roller, and if it does not, cut the opening larger. Oil the cut edges, and bolt in place using the oval head bolts and locknuts. Install self-tapping screws on any tapered boards on each side if necessary to secure any pointed ends. Sand any sharp edges of the teak platform, then re-oil.

Section B-05
WESTSAIL 32 STAINLESS STEEL BOOMKIN

I have had many requests to replace the wooden boomkin with a stainless steel one, and we have a number of options available to do this. This boomkin mounts on the side of the hull, rather than on deck, and clears up the stern deck area nicely. To replace the wooden boomkin, the design is a simple stainless pipe boomkin, consisting of 1-1/4" ID pipes, which are 1-5/8" OD, and a stainless crosspiece similar to the one on the wooden boomkin with a 4" vertical web. There are hull pads on the ends which bolt just below the rubrail, with backup washers inside the lazarette. Tabs are welded on the inboard side of the pipe to mount teak boards to be able to step out onto the boomkin. The boomkin sits lower than the wooden one, and the existing backstay needs lengthening. A toggle is provided to add to the backstay to allow takeup in the turnbuckle. The existing whisker stays are used. All mounting bolts and backup washers are provided. All stainless parts are either hand buffed and polished, or are electropolished in a chemical solution.

To handle the mainsheet, if you do not have a mid-boom traveler, you may request a hoop welded across the boomkin pipes, with a strap welded at the top in the center over the tiller. A fiddle block is used at this attachment point instead of the two single blocks normally used, with a camcleat built in to handle securing the mainsheet.

A stern pulpit is available, and it has an intermediate rail on each side for rigidity and safety. Loops for lifeline attachment are also provided. Clamps are available to attach to the boom gallows to run lifelines from the gallows to the pulpit. A fixed upper rail is available as an alternate to the upper lifeline on the stern pulpit. This 1" stainless tube extension goes between the pulpit and the boom gallows, and provides a solid extension. Split clamps are provided to attach to the gallows legs, and the pipes are cut to final length upon installation. The pulpit is made so that the top rail comes just even with the crosspiece, and you may mount a wind vane on the crosspiece and it will be aft of the pulpit. The rail is straight across the stern in order to clear in front of the vane. The pulpit fits into sockets welded to the boomkin pipes, and is removable.

The crosspiece is designed so that its aft face is vertical and has holes in it to bolt a Sayes windvane directly to it. For an Aires or Monitor windvane, there are mounting adapter plates available. They consist of rectangular plates with a slotted hole, and pipes welded on. These fit into the sockets on the vane housing, and the slots permit adjustment to fit. A second hole is then drilled in each plate to rigidly mount the plates to the crosspiece. Other types of vanes may be mounted, and if you send me a description of the vane, with its mounting dimensions, an adapter can be designed and built.

The teak platform boards consist of 13/16" thick by 5" wide teak boards, fitted and bolted to the tabs on the pipes. These boards will permit you to easily walk out onto the boomkin.

For an anchor roller, if you do not have a windvane mounted, a stainless frame with a plastic roller is available that bolts to the top of the crosspiece. If you do have a windvane, you should lead the stern anchor line off of the caprail, well ahead of the stern, to prevent fouling the vane.

A boarding ladder is also available that attaches to the midrail of this stern pulpit, and hinges up to align with the upper rail. This allows the ladder to be long enough to reach the water, yet hinge up to be clear while sailing. The ladder mounts on the starboard side, if the engine exhaust is out the port side. You may need to notch the boards on the boomkin to keep the ladder in straight alignment.


WESTSAIL 32 SS BOOMKIN, PULPIT AND LADDER




Section B-05 Price List - Westsail 32 Stainless Steel Boomkin

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Stainless Steel Boomkin - with hull mounting pads, tabs welded on to attach boards, all fasteners, backstay toggle $  950.00 pkg
Stainless Steel Boomkin - with stern pulpit, hull mounting pads, tabs welded on, all fasteners, backstay toggle 1,485.00 pkg
Stainless Steel Boomkin - with mainsheet hoop, hull mounting pads, tabs welded on, all fasteners, backstay toggle 1,375.00 pkg
Stainless Steel Boomkin - with mainsheet hoop and stern pulpit, hull mounting pads, tabs welded on, all fasteners, backstay toggle 1,915.00 pkg
Stainless Steel Boomkin - with arch, mainsheet hoop and stern pulpit, hull mounting plates, tangs welded on, backstay toggle, fixed upper rails 2,695.00 pkg
Fixed Upper Rail - Additional cost for fixed upper rails on pulpit with 1" split jaw fittings to extend to boom gallows 95.00 pair
Ladder Mounted - on to the middle rail of the stern pulpit, with hinged section to drop into the water, Specify port or starboard side 580.00 each
Teak Platform Boards - (2) fitted, drilled and bullnosed, with fasteners 350.00 pair
Windvane Adapter Plates - for Aires or Monitor, with fasteners 230.00 pair
Fiddle Block - with becket and raised cam cleat for main sheet 92.00 each
Anchor Roller Frame and Rollers - stainless frame with dual plastic rollers for stern anchor 60.00 pkg
Clamps for Lifelines - to fit 1" tubing on boom gallows legs 10.00 each
New Boomkin Stay Tangs - pair of tangs, 1-1/2" wide, with fasteners 100.00 pair
Shipping for Boomkin with Pulpit - Shipping of the boomkin with pulpit must be by truck freight because of the size. We wrap it and pack it in a box to protect it in shipping. The cost of packing and crating is about $45.00. There is usually a minimum freight charge of about $175 to $200 from the shipping companies. (Contact Us)

Section B-06
WESTSAIL 32 STAINLESS STEEL BOOMKIN INSTALLATION

To replace the wooden boomkin, I have designed a simple stainless pipe boomkin, consisting of 1-1/4" ID pipes, which are 1-5/8" OD, and a stainless crosspiece similar to the one on the wooden boomkin, with a 4" vertical web. There are hull pads on the ends which bolt just below the rubrail, with backup washers inside the lazarette. Tabs are welded on the inboard side of the pipe to mount teak boards to be able to step out onto the boomkin. The boomkin sits lower than the wooden one, and the existing backstay needs lengthening. A toggle is provided to allow for the added length so as to have enough take-up in the turnbuckle. The existing whisker stays are used. All mounting bolts and backup washers are provided. All stainless parts are either hand buffed and polished, or are electropolished in a chemical solution.

The wooden boomkin should be removed prior to starting the installation. Seal the holes in the deck with epoxy resin, and fill with epoxy putty. Slip the end pieces onto the boomkin pipes, with the pads attached with the 5/8" bolts and nuts on loosely. Temporarily secure with string to prevent dropping the pieces. Tie up the front ends on each side, and block up, or tie up, the aft end. The hull pads have ears welded on close to one side. This side should have the ear at the top edge of the plate up tight against the underside of the rubrail, and the boomkin should follow the sheerline aft. It is actually about an eight degree rise for the boomkin. Level the boomkin from side to side. If necessary, trim some off of the underside of the rubrail for a better fit of the hull pads. Drill one hole on each side. The pads should fit with the aft holes approximately 25" from the stern, and the top holes about 1" below the rubrail.

Recheck the alignment, then drill the other three holes on each side. Take off the boomkin and bolt on the pads with backup washers, lockwashers, and nuts on the inside of the lazarette, and with a ring of caulking around each hole in the hull. Install the boomkin and tighten up the 5/8" locknuts. When you attach the boomkin to the hull, the end fittings slips into the boomkin tube, then the 5/8" bolt attaches it to the hullpad. Once installed, there is no way they can come apart, short of unbolting the end fitting from the hull pad. However, I do supply two 1/4" bolts with locknuts if you want to drill through the fitting and attach the bolts. The holes are already in the boomkin tubes, but not in the fitting that slips into it. Don't drill the holes until the boomkin is completely attached to the hull.

Connect the backstay with a toggle below the turnbuckle, and also connect the boomkin stays. Check the alignment of the boomkin tangs on the hull with the stays. If the alignment is off, then remove one of the bolts holding the stays to the hull, align the tang with the stay, and redrill the hole. Seal the old hole with epoxy putty, and recaulk the boomkin tangs before tightening the bolts. Adjust and tighten the stays.

Trim the ends of the teak platform boards as needed to clear the hull, oil the cut ends, and install the boards.

If you are installing an Aires or Monitor windvane, position the two mounting fittings to the crosspiece and attach a 1/2" bolt through the slotted hole. Slip the windvane onto the mounting fittings, and snug up. Adjust the vane to fit, then mark the crosspiece to drill the other two 1/2" holes. Remove the vane, drill the holes, then re-bolt the mounting fittings and the vane. Lastly, drill for the locking bolts to hold the vane body to the mounting tubes. On the installation for the Monitor windvane there are two supporting struts from the lower ends of the vane that can go back up to the ears welded on the bottom of the boomkin pipes for additional rigidity.

Section B-07
WESTSAIL 32 STERN PULPIT

This pulpit mounts with four base plates to the wooden boomkin, with backup plates on the underside. It has an intermediate rail on each side for rigidity and safety. Loops for lifeline attachment are also provided. Clamps are available to attach to the boom gallows to run lifelines from the gallows to the pulpit. The pulpit is made so that the top rail comes just even with the crosspiece, and you may mount a wind vane on the crosspiece and it will be aft of the pulpit. The rail is straight across the stern to clear in front of the vane.

A fixed upper rail is available as an alternate to the upper lifeline on the stern pulpit. This 1" stainless tube extension goes between the pulpit and the boom gallows, and provides a solid extension. Split clamps are provided to attach to the gallows legs, and the pipes are cut to final length upon installation. A fixed mid rail can also be added if desired.

The stern pulpit works fine providing the mainsheet is on a traveler on the bridgedeck or above the hatch. If you have the original design of blocks on the boomkin to handle the mainsheet, a hoop is available welded to the pulpit, with a strap welded at the top in the center over the tiller. A fiddle block with becket is used at this attachment point instead of the two single blocks normally used, with a camcleat built in to handle securing the mainsheet. It will be necessary to remove the existing blocks on the boomkin to mount the stern pulpit.

A boarding ladder is also available that attaches to the midrail of this stern pulpit, and hinges up to align with the upper rail. This allows the ladder to be long enough to reach the water, yet hinge up to be clear while sailing. The ladder mounts on the starboard side, if the engine exhaust is out the port side. You may need to mount spacer blocks on the side of the boomkin to keep the ladder in straight alignment.


W32 Stern Pulpit

STERN PULPIT WITH UPPER RAILS AND LADDER


Stern pulpit with upper rails


Stern pulpit with mainsheet
hoop and folding ladder


Stern pulpit with upper rails and ladder

Section B-07 Price List - Westsail 32 Stern Pulpit for Wood Boomkin

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Stern Pulpit - with fasteners and backup plates $  545.00 pkg
Stern Pulpit with Mainsheet Hoop and Backup Plates 985.00 pkg
Fiddle Block with Becket and Camcleat for Mainsheet 92.00 each
Clamps for Lifelines - to fit 1" boom gallows legs 10.00 each
Ladder to Mount on W32 Stern Pulpit - Port side midrail mounting with hinged piece that drops into water 580.00 each
Ladder to Mount on W32 Stern Pulpit - Starboard side middle rail mounting with hinged piece that drops into water 580.00 each
Boomkin Pulpit Upper Rails - Additional cost for fixed upper rails on pulpit with 1" split jaw fittings to extend to boom gallows 95.00 pair
Boomkin Pulpit Middle Rails - Additional cost for fixed middle rails on pulpit with 1" split jaw fittings to extend to boom gallows 95.00 pair
Pulpit Shipping - Shipping of the pulpit must be by truck freight because of the size. We wrap it and pack it in a box to protect it in shipping. The cost of packing and crating is about $45.00. There is usually a minimum freight charge of about $150 from the shipping companies, however we will obtain the least expensive shipping method for you. (Contact Us)

Section B-08
MAINSHEET HOOP AND FIDDLE BLOCK

On the majority of the Westsail 32s, the mainsheet is controlled with blocks bolted to the boomkin. As an alternative, Westsail did offer a track across the bridge deck, or a traveler on a frame across the cabin top ahead of the main hatch.

As an another alternative to handle the mainsheet, I have available a hoop frame that can be bolted to the wooden boomkin, with a strap welded at the top in the center over the tiller. A fiddle block with becket is used at this attachment point instead of the two single blocks normally used, with a camcleat built in to handle securing the mainsheet. It is necessary to remove the existing blocks on the boomkin to mount this mainsheet hoop.

This hoop was originally designed to work in conjunction with a stern pulpit, however I have had some owners request this hoop arrangement without the stern pulpit.

For the Westsail 28, the mainsheet traveler was usually across the bridge deck, or sometimes on loops welded to the stainless pipe frame boomkin. This hoop is also available to mount on the boomkin to carry the mainsheet block up over the tiller if you have the mainsheet arrangement on the end of the boom. This hoop has saddles on all four feet to clamp or bolt onto the boomkin pipe. You will need to grind off the welded loops if they are now holding the mainsheet blocks to the boomkin pipe if they interfere with locating the hoop and stern pulpit. Check the drawing for the leg locations if you have any other hardware mounted on the boomkin, in the event there may be interference.


Installation with existing
pulpit Aft 18" Forward 26"

Section B-08 Price List - Westsail 28 and 32 Mainsheet Hoop

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Westsail 32 Mainsheet Hoop - for wood boomkin with backup plates and fasteners $  495.00 pkg
Westsail 28 Mainsheet Hoop - for pipe frame boomkin with welded saddles, clamps, and fasteners 495.00 pkg
Fiddle Block for Mainsheet - with becket and cam 92.00 each

Section B-09
WESTSAIL 28 STERN PULPIT

We have designed and built a stern pulpit to fit the Westsail 28, as the boats did not normally have them when first built by Westsail. This pulpit is made from 1" stainless steel tubing, and mounts with the two forward base plates on the caprail, and the two aft legs on the stainless steel boomkin pipe that is used on the majority of the Westsail 28s. These aft legs have removable sockets with a saddle welded to the ends to fit over the boomkin pipe, and they can be fastened with hose clamps around the boomkin pipes, or by drilling and tapping into the boomkin pipes and bolting with 1/4" bolts. The pulpit has an intermediate rail on each side for rigidity and safety. Loops for lifeline attachments are also provided.

Some of this design were installed on the Westsail 28 that has the mainsheet traveler across the bridge deck, so there is no interference of the mainsheet with the stern pulpit rails. If you have the mainsheet arrangement on the end of the boom, a hoop is available to mount on the boomkin to carry the mainsheet block up over the tiller. This hoop also has saddles on all four feet to clamp or bolt onto the boomkin pipe. You will need to grind off the welded loops now holding the mainsheet blocks to the boomkin pipe if they interfere with locating the hoop and stern pulpit. Check the drawing for the leg locations if you have any other hardware mounted on the boomkin, in the event there may be interference.

A boarding ladder is also available that attaches to the midrail of this stern pulpit, and hinges up to align with the upper rail. This allows the ladder to be long enough to reach the water, yet hinge up to be clear while sailing. The ladder mounts on the starboard side, if the engine exhaust is out the port side.

Shipping of the pulpit must be by truck freight because of the size. We wrap it and pack it in a box to protect it in shipping. The cost of packing and crating is about $45.00. There is usually a minimum freight charge of about $150 from the shipping companies, however we will obtain the least expensive shipping method for you..


W28 Stern Pulpit Drawing

Section B-09 Price List - Westsail 28 Stern Pulpit

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Stern Pulpit - with fasteners and clamps $  650.00 pkg
Boomkin Mainsheet Hoop - to go over tiller, with fasteners 495.00 each
Mainsheet Hoop Fiddle Block - with becket and cam cleat 92.00 each
Ladder to Mount on W28 Stern Pulpit - Port side mounting attached to middle rail with hinged section reaching down to water 580.00 each
Ladder to Mount on W28 Stern Pulpit - Starboard side mounting attached to middle rail with hinged section reaching down to water 580.00 each
Terms: - 50% deposit with order, balance COD, plus shipping (+ sales tax in CA)

Section B-10
LONG DOUBLE RAIL BOW PULPIT

The W-28s and W-32s were built with short, single rail bow pulpits. These pulpits are somewhat wobbly, but the biggest disadvantage is the large open space at the aft end of the bowsprit platform, and back to the first stanchion. This space is enclosed with the lifelines, but they do not give a good grip to prevent slipping off of the platform. Also, when you drop a headsail onto the platform, it will easily fall down between the lifelines and into the water.

We have designed a long double rail bow pulpit to solve this problem, and make going forward much safer. The forward part of this pulpit has the same bases and locations as the standard small pulpit, but it does have an intermediate rail to stiffen up the pulpit. This long pulpit extends back to the aft end of the platform, with bases the same as the forward ones. The aft bases should be located directly over the long threaded rod holding the platform to the bowsprit. There is an intermediate rail for added strength and security. Loops are welded to the ends to attach to the lifelines. The lifeline wires will have to be shortened to connect to this extended pulpit. Plates are welded to the forward legs to mount the running lights. Holes are provided in the aft base plates to pass the running light electric wires down thru the platform.

You will need to measure the location from the existing aft leg on the short pulpit back to the center of the aft threaded rod on the platform. This dimension is usually 31-1/2" on the W-28, and 37-1/2" on the W-32, but can vary depending on the installation of the platform. The forward leg dimension should be 37-1/2" on either boat. Check all of these dimensions when placing an order for this long pulpit.

If you desire a front loop on the midrail, this can be added. The dip that was put on many of the original short pulpits is not available due to the difficulty of making the bends.

Shipping of this long pulpit must be by truck freight because of the size. We wrap it and pack it in a box to protect it in shipping. The cost of packing and crating is about $45.00. There is usually a minimum freight charge of about $175 to $200 from the shipping companies, however we will obtain the least expensive shipping method for you..

W28 Long Pulpit

W32 Long Pulpit

Section B-10 Price List - Long Double Rail Bow Pulpit

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Long Double Rail Bow Pulpit - with fasteners $  925.00 pkg
Intermediate Front Rail Loop - for Long double-rail bow pulpt (additional charge) 90.00 each
Construction of Shipping Crate - for long double rail bow pulpit 45.00 each

Section B-11
MAST RAILS

BRACED MAST RAILS OR MAST PULPITS

A safety item that has been very popular are mast pulpits, or safety rails alongside the mast. The standard version I have designed has three legs for additional rigidity and is made from 1-1/4" OD stainless steel tubing. The fore and aft legs mount alongside the mast, and the third leg mounts outboard of the handrail in line with the mast. Tabs are welded on if you want to add a teak bar with hooks or belaying pins. The rail bolts through the cabin top with 1/4" round head bolts and backup plates are supplied for the inside. The rails fit equally well on all of the Westsail line of boats. They are available at a standard 34" height, or an optional 36" height for those that prefer a little taller height. The early W-32s with the first deck mold use the mast rails with a 2 degree angle on the outer leg; the later boats, including the W-28 and W-43, with more crown on the cabin top, use a 4 degree angle on the outer leg.

An alternate design is one we call the bun hugger. On this one, the for and aft rail comes up, then is curved outboard to form a pocket, and the mid-leg comes straight down from the top rail. This serves to hold you in very well, as well as putting you slightly further away from the mast.

Normally we make these rails with the for and aft legs 24" apart, and the middle leg 9" outboard. We can vary these dimensions if you have an interference problem with any hardware already installed on the cabintop alongside the mast.

The normal installation for the Westsail boats has the two center legs bolted through the cabin top, using the backup plates inside. Slip on regular hex nuts, then break off the excess length using a vise grips, and back off the nuts and install the locknuts. The center legs go down with the self-tapping screws, as they are over the deck beams. In the event there is an interference problem of the end of the staysail boom with the top of the mast rail, possibly the staysail is riding too low on the stay. Lengthening the pennant on the bottom of the staysail will permit the clew to be raised enough to clear the mast rail.

These mast rails are also made for the Westsail 42 cutter, with one leg mounted up on the upper cabin top, and the other two on the lower cabin top. This design fits with the forward leg on the aft blank spot on the cabin top, the aft leg on the upper cabin top, and the outboard leg on the round spot that has nonskid on it. Check to make sure nothing else has been mounted to interfere with the leg placement. If there is an interference, mark up a drawing for the new locations of the bases, and I can have that made up to fit your boat.

BUN HUGGER MAST RAIL DRAWING

Bun Hugger Mast Rail

Mast Rails Location

Standard Mast Rail

W42 Mast Rail

Section B-11 Price List - Braced Mast Rails or Mast Pulpits

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Standard Mast Safety Rails - with backups and fasteners. Please specify height and angle of cabin top. (sold as a pair) $  490.00 pair
Bun Hugger Mast Pulpit - designed with curved top rail, pair with backups and fasteners. Please specify height and angle of cabin top. (sold as a pair) 555.00 pair
Standard Mast Safety Rails for W42 with One Leg Short - with backups and fasteners. Please specify height. (sold as a pair) 490.00 pair
Mast Pulpit Shipping Cost - to the East Coast by FedEx Ground email bud@westsail.com

Section B-12
BOOM GALLOWS

Boom gallows frames are available for all of the Westsail boats, made to the original Westsail drawings, and to some new designs that have been done.

The most popular boom gallows frame was of 1" OD stainless steel tubing, with ears welded to the top rail to hold a teak bar, and a brace fore and aft on each leg, with round base plates. On the W-32 the legs sit on the caprail, and on the W-42 and W-43 they sit on the cabin top. The 1-3/4" thick teak bar drops into the pocket formed by the welded ears, and 1/4" bolts hold it in place. Loops are welded on the frame to attach lifelines on the W-28 and W-32 versions. I have also had extra tabs welded on to hold a teak bar to attach a lifering or outboard motor. This type of gallows frame is also available made with 1-1/4" OD stainless steel tubing, which proves to be much more rigid.

An alternative design on the early W-32 had an 1-1/4" pipe stanchion bolted to the bulwark as the aft lifeline stanchion, and a removable 1" pipe dropped in and pinned in place. This pipe has a U-shaped pocket on top to hold the teak bar. This permits removal of the gallows, yet the gate stanchions remain in place.

Alternative designs for the W-42 and W-43 are also available. These use an 1-1/2" pipe as the upright, with the base pads on the cabin top. Depending on the desired aesthetic look you want, the gallows metal can be of the traditional design with curved bronze end pieces to go over the teak bar, or stainless pipes that attach to the teak bar with the ends of the bar protruding. With the bronze end pieces on the teak bar, we use cast bronze feet on the cabin top, and brass pipe as uprights. The stainless steel version would have 8" square base plates welded to the upright pipes to mount on the top of the cabin. There is a piece that attaches to the teak bar, and fits into the pipes. This allows for fitting the gallows in place, and easy alignment. Both versions are equally strong, and easily bolted to the cabin. All necessary fasteners are supplied. All versions come polished, and the stainless steel is also electropolished.

The boom gallows can be cut and sleeved to make for easier and less costly shipping. The shipping of this gallows can be in two packages by Fed Ex ground, for about $85.00.

If it is shipped in one piece, then it must go by truck freight because of the size. Because of the danger of damaging the gallows in shipping, we must build a crate of square steel tubing to protect the pulpit. Construction of this crate is about $100.00. There is usually a minimum freight charge of about $190 from the shipping companies.

WESTSAIL 32 STANDARD & OLD STYLE BOOM GALLOWS


Standard W32 Boom Gallows Frame


Boom Gallows frame to fit old style W32 stanchion/boom support

Section B-12 Price List - Boom Gallows

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Boom Gallows, 1" SS Tubing - Frame made of 1" stainless steel tubing, with fasteners $  735.00 pkg
Boom Gallows, 1-1/4" SS Tubing - Frame made of 1-1/4" stainless steel tubing, with fasteners 865.00 pkg
Boom Gallows, SS Pipe - Frame made of 1" stainless steel pipe, with top fittings and base plates Contact us) email bud@westsail.com
Boom Gallows, Bronze Pipe - Frame made of bronze pipe with bronze curved ends and bases (Contact Us)
Boom Gallows Option - Additional tabs or loops welded on stainless steel version 20.00 each
Boom Gallows Teak Bar - 1-3/4" teak bar cut and fitted for any version (contact us)
Boom Gallows Sleeving - Cut and sleeve boom gallows for easier shipping 60.00 pkg
Boom Gallows Shipping Crate - Construction of shipping crate for one piece shipping 100.00 ship
Boom Gallows Shipping - The boom gallows can be cut and sleeved to make for easier and less costly shipping. The shipping of this gallows can be in two packages by Fed Ex ground, for about $85.00. If it is shipped in one piece, then it must go by truck freight because of the size. Because of the danger of damaging the gallows in shipping, we must build a crate of square steel tubing to protect the pulpit. There is usually a minimum freight charge of about $190 from most shipping companies.

Section B-13
WESTSAIL PULPITS, RAILS, STANCHIONS AND LIFELINES

The bow pulpit should be carefully checked, especially at the welds where it attaches to the platform. After hitting pilings a few times, or other boats or similar immovable objects, the welds sometimes crack, or water gets in and corrodes the weld, causing a break. Check the wire loops welded to the pulpit to attach the lifelines for signs of broken welds. I have always felt the Westsail 28 and 32 single rail bow pulpit was not very sturdy, did not offer enough protection because it only came back halfway on the platform, and did not have an intermediate rail to help prevent the jib from blowing overboard when it is pulled down and stuffed onto to the platform in preparation to securing it.

A long double rail bow pulpit is available to replace the original short single rail pulpit. This pulpit mounts in the same place as the original, however the aft end extends back to the end of the platform. There is an intermediate rail for added strength and security. Loops are welded to the ends to attach to the lifelines. The lifeline wires will have to be shortened to connect to this xtended pulpit. Plates are welded to the forward legs to mount the running lights. Holes are provided in the aft base plates to pass the running light electric wires down thru the platform. Check the drawing for the leg locations to match the platform installed on your boat.

Another popular safety item for the Westsail 32 is a stern pulpit. This pulpit mounts with four baseplates to the wooden boomkin, with backup plates on the underside. It has an intermediate rail on each side for rigidity and safety. Loops for lifeline attachments are also provided. The pulpit is made so that the top rail comes just behind the crosspiece, and is straight across the stern in order to clear in front of a windvane. Lifeline clamps are available to attach to a 1" tube boom gallows to run lifelines from the gallows to the pulpit.

This stern pulpit works fine providing the mainsheet is installed on a traveler on the bridgedeck or above the hatch. If you have the original design of mainsheet at the end of the boom, a hoop is available welded to the pulpit, with a strap welded at the top in the center over the tiller. A fiddle block with becket is used at this attachment point instead of the two single blocks normally used on the boomkin, with a camcleat built in to handle securing the mainsheet. It is necessary to remove the existing blocks on the boomkin to mount the stern pulpit.

A similar stern pulpit is available to fit the Westsail 28. This pulpit is made from 1" stainless steel tubing, and mounts with the two forward baseplates on the caprail and the after two legs on the stainless steel boomkin pipe. These aft legs have removable sockets with a saddle welded to the ends to fit over the boomkin pipe, and they can be fastened with hose clamps around the boomkin pipes, or by drilling and tapping into the boomkin pipes and bolting with 1/4" bolts. The pulpit has an intermediate rail on each side for rigidity and safety. Loops for lifeline attachments are also provided. A hoop is also available to mount on the boomkin to carry the mainsheet block up over the tiller if you have the mainsheet arrangement on the end of the boom. This hoop also has saddles on all four feet to clamp or bolt onto the boomkin pipe.

The condition of the lifeline stanchions should be carefully inspected for signs of corrosion cracks, breaks, bending of the gate stanchions, and condition of the welded ears attached to the lifeline. On the aluminum stanchions used on the later Westsail 32s, the welded loops have been known to wear through, or break off. If they do, they can be replaced with a stainless steel eyestrap, through bolted with #10 bolts and locknuts.

A prevalent source of leaks on the boats is the caulking behind the stanchion bolts. Because the stanchion is subject to such great stress and flexing, the caulking breaks down after a number of years, and permits water to leak in. Every few years you should loosen the bolts holding the stanchions, clean off the old caulking, and recaulk with new polysulphide caulking.

On the early Westsail 32s, only three stanchions were installed on each side. All of the later boats had a fourth one installed just ahead of the forward lower shroud. Some of you with these older boats may want to add a stanchion at this spot. Specify a #3 stanchion, as Westsail numbered them with #1 gate stanchion by the aft end of the house, the #2 is midships, and the forward stanchion is #4.

The #1 gate stanchions Westsail used did not usually have a brace to prevent them from bending when the lifeline gates are down. Some of the boats did have a brace, but the brace was usually below the middle lifeline, and the stanchion will bend just above the midpoint. The proper gate stanchion should have a brace leg extending about 2/3 the way up the stanchion, and have loops welded on one side of the stanchion, and to the brace, to attach the lower lifeline. These are available as a replacement.

The lifelines should be tested periodically, by kicking each fitting with your foot. If the lifelines survive this test, then each turnbuckle should be unscrewed completely, the threads thoroughly inspected, and then some oil or grease applied when they are reinstalled. Carefully check the swage fittings where the wire enters the stud for cracking of the swages, or broken strands of the wire. Tighten all locking nuts, or install new cotter pins.

Shipping of the pulpits must be by truck freight because of the size. Because of the danger of damaging the pulpit in shipping, we must build a crate of square steel tubing to protect the pulpit, or use a heavy cardboard box. Construction of this crate is about $100.00. The box is $45.00. There is usually a minimum freight charge of about $190 from the shipping companies.

The costs on some of the parts are as follows:

Section B-13 Price List - Pulpits, Rails, Stanchions, and Lifelines

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Bow Pulpit, Single Rail - Standard single rail bow pulpit with midrail and fasteners $  595.00 pkg
Bow Pulpit, Long Double Rail - Long double rail bow pulpit with midrail and fasteners 925.00 pkg
W32 Stern Pulpit - with fasteners and backup plates 545.00 pkg
W32 Stern Pulpit with Hoop - with mainsheet hoop for boom end sheeting 985.00 pkg
W28 Stern Pulpit - with fasteners and clamps 650.00 pkg
W28 Boomkin Mainsheet Hoop - mainsheet hoop for boom end sheeting 495.00 pkg
Stanchion 1" Stainless - specify location 120.00 each
Stanchion, 1-1/4" Stainless - for late model W32 decks 190.00 each
Gate Stanchion 1" Stainless - with brace leg. Specify port or starboard side 160.00 each
Double Lifelines with Gates Both Sides - with pelican hooks, specify lengths on a drawing or send me the old lifelines 700.00 pkg
1" Lifeline Clamps - to attach to boom gallows 10.00 each
Terms: - 50% deposit with order, balance COD, plus shipping (+ sales tax in CA)

Section C-01
HAWSE PIPES

Westsail Parts Company has had heavy cast bronze hawse pipes to replace the original spun brass ones used on most of the Westsails. After a number of years, the spun brass ones crack out due to age and start to leak or cut the ropes passing through them. Unfortunately, my source on them has closed down, however I am looking for a new source.

The cast bronze sets consist of a pair of castings, one with a long spigot and the other with a short spigot. A piece of hose is supplied to cover over the joint and, if caulked in place, will form a watertight seal. It is usually necessary to cut or grind off a little bit of the longer spigot to get the flanges of the hawse pipes to fit tight to the bulwarks.

In some cases, we have found the width of the bulwark to be greater than standard, and the two spigots will not come together. In this event, we can exchange the short side spigot for another long side spigot, giving you a set with two long spigots, which allows enough extra length for cutting.

To install these cast bronze hawse pipes, first fit and trim them to come together tight against the bulwarks. You may also need to trim some of the flange to get a tight fit. If you find the old hole is cut a little too large to be able to install the screws in the flange, you can use some epoxy putty to reduce the size of the hole. One trick that works is to get a cardboard tube of the correct outside diameter, and use it as a form and pack the putty around the outside of the tube with a putty knife to fill the gap. Wrap the tube with thin plastic sheet to be able to easily remove it after the epoxy putty has hardened. After the putty hardens, remove the tube, trim the hole as necessary, and install the hawse pipes.

Fit them in place and drill pilot holes for the self tapping screws on the flange. Caulk and install one half. Caulk and push on the hose from the open side, then push in the other half and screw it in place. This should form a watertight seal that will last the life of the boat.

There are no replacement bronze tubes for the 2" scupper tube deck drains, however we do have fiberglass tubes that will replace the cracked brass scupper deck drains.



Section C-01 Price List - Hawse Pipes

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Set of Cast Bronze Hawse Pipes - with hose and screws, and cardboard tube. Not currently available, but looking for other suppliers
Scupper Drain Tubes - 2" dia. fiberglass tube for 4 scupper tube deck drains 32.00 pkg

Section C-02
SCUPPER DRAIN TUBES

On most of the Westsails 2" diameter spun brass scupper drain tubes were used for deck drains. Over the years the brass has cracked on many of them, causing leaks into the boat. There are no replacement brass or bronze tubes available similar to the cast bronze hawse pipes, however I do have a 2" outside diameter filament wound fiberglass tube that will do the job. It is not too difficult a job to replace the brass scupper tubes with the fiberglass ones, and because they are made of fiberglass, they can be properly bonded to the hull and should last the lifetime of the boat.

Remove the spun brass ones and clean off all the old caulking. In many cases, the teak rubrail covers over part of the outside flange. Use a sharp wood chisel and undercut the bottom of the rubrail to clear the flange on the tube. With care, you should not have to cut into the outer face of the rubrail, and the undercut will not be seen. Clean out the inside of the holes with a drum sander or a round file so that the fiberglass tube will slip thru. Mark the tubing while in place for the exact length, then pull out and cut off, smooth the ends and round the inside edges. Mark which hole each fits into. You may want to leave the outside bottom edge of the tube extending slightly beyond the hull, so as the dripping water will tend to fall away, rather than run down the side of the hull and staining the gelcoat. You might also want to make up plastic or formica washers to go around the outside to cover the old screw holes. These can be installed with a spot of caulking.

If you did not previously have the tubes installed, then it is necessary to drill new holes. Drill the inside one with the bottom edge just touching the sloped bottom to assure complete drainage of the well with no trapped water. Drill the one on the hull with the top edge just under the rubrail. Use a 2" hole saw with a 1/4" drill for a pilot and start the holes from both ends in the correct location. Before drilling thru with the hole saw, use a long 1/4" pilot rod and align the hole saw hole using the 1/4" pilot thru to the opposite hole as a guide. This will insure the correct angle for the hole so the tube will fit.

Mix up some white epoxy putty, such as Marine-Tex or Permalite, and coat the edges of the hole and slip the tube in place. From inside between the bulwarks fill in a bead of epoxy putty with your finger to seal the tube in place. From the outside fill in any cracks between the tube and the hole. Scrape off any excess on the outside with a putty knife just as the epoxy gets firm but before it really hardens. Touchup the gelcoat if necessary to finish the job, or install plastic or formica washers.

The fiberglass tube is supplied in one long length, and can be cut with a hack saw into the lengths needed for each hole.

Section C-02 Price List - Scupper Drain Tubes

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Scupper Drain Tubes - 2" diameter fiberglass tubing - for 4 drains $  32.00 pkg
Expoxy Glue - Sufficient epoxy putty for 4 drain tubes 25.00 each

Section C-03
PORTLIGHT GLASS, SCREENS, AND GASKETS

PORTLIGHT GLASS

After time, the glass in the portlights becomes cloudy, especially at the bottom, due to water getting in and degrading the safety film in the glass. The glass is held in place with caulking, and a brass ring. There is no tool specially made to remove the ring holding in the glass on the bronze portlights. Depending on the make of portlight, the glass removes differently. On some, the ring holding in the glass has threads on it, and it screws into place. On others it pushes into place, and is held by tiny screws. You will have to inspect one carefully to see how it comes apart. You will have to break out the glass in the portlight, and clean out all of the glass and the old caulking to be able to free up the ring enough to get it off. Pre-cut replacement glass is not available. Take the portlight to a glass shop and have them cut a piece of safety glass for you. Install it with clear silicon caulking, install the ring, then trim off the excess caulking after it has cured.

W42 SALON WINDOW GASKET

I have available the gasket material used on the fixed 3/8" thick windows in the salon of the W-42

PORTLIGHT SCREENS

ABI went out of business, but I have found another source for some of the round screens. The screens are bronze or stainless, with a plastic lip seal around the edge of the stainless ones to seal well. Screens for the oval portlights are also currently being made. Check them out at this website: http://www.johndanicic.com/screens-crealock.htm.

PORTLIGHT GASKET MATERIAL

We have the gasket material available, but will need to know the size of the present material. Depending on the make and size of the portlight, it may be 1/4" square, 5/16" square, or 3/8" square. You will need to pull a piece of the gasket material out of the groove, and measure the width down in the bottom of the groove. The gasket material comes in long strips, and you cut it, putting the joint on top, and hold it in place with some weatherstrip adhesive, available in most auto supply stores. Let us know how many and what size the portlights are, and the gasket size.

PORTLIGHT ADJUSTMENT

The majority of the portlights have a slotted hinge on the top of the frame, with set screws that push against the hinge rod. Adjust these setscrews to obtain an even compression of the gasket when the lower dogs are tightened.

Section C-03 Price List - Portlight Screens and Gaskets

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Portlight Screens - 4" round portlight screen (contact us)
Portlight Screens - 6" round plastic portlight screen 20.00 each
Portlight Screens - 8" round stainless portlight screen (contact us) email bud@westsail.com
Portlight Screens - Oval portlight screens (contact us)
Portlight Gasket - 1/4" rubber portlight gasket 1.40 foot
Portlight Gasket - 5/16" rubber portlight gasket 1.55 foot
Portlight Gasket - 3/8" rubber portlight gasket 1.80 foot
Portlight Gasket - W42 rubber gasket for 3/8" thick windows 2.50 foot

Section C-04
GENOA TRACK

1-1/4" gray anodized genoa track is available to install on top of the caprail. It is an extruded T-track, with built in riser. It has 5/16" diameter countersunk holes every 4" for installation, and 3/8" holes between them for the stop pin on the track block. Black nylon end stops are available, as well as ball bearing track blocks for the genoa. An 8' piece is as long as can be shipped by UPS, and will work fine on the Westsail 32 or 28.

The track can be installed by drilling and tapping the fiberglass top of the bulwark through the caprail, and using flat head bolts to hold the track. If it possible to install backup washers and nuts on some of the bolts, then that will doubly secure the track. If not, threading each bolt into the fiberglass will hold the track. All of the holes should be drilled and tapped first, then the track removed and all debris cleaned up before installing permanently with caulking.

Centering Rail for Attachment

To install the genoa track, it takes two people, and a drill motor with 1/4" drill bit, a slow turning reversible drill motor with 5/16"-18 tap, and a screwgun with driver bit to fit the screw slot. Start at the aft end, and drill the first hole in the center of the caprail, about 8" ahead of the winch on the bulwark. Tap the hole with the 5/16" tap, being careful not to strip out the fiberglass when you cut the threads. Install the first bolt just snug, with the track extending out over the bulwark. Align the second hole in the center of the caprail, and drill and tap that hole, and install a bolt. Next, push the end of the track inboard to align the next hole in the center of the caprail, drill and tap that hole, and install a bolt. Continue pushing the track in, and installing bolts in each hole until all are drilled and tapped. Next remove all of the bolts, clean off the caprail and the track of all drilling debris, and prepare to caulk and permanently install the track. Use a polyurethane or polysulphide caulking, and liberally put caulking around each bolt hole on the caprail. Begin at the aft end and start the end bolt. Put some caulking in the countersink under the head of the bolt, then run the bolt down almost all the way. Continue installing each bolt, with caulking in the countersink under each bolthead until all bolts are in place. Now go back and tighten each bolt down snug. If you can reach the underside of the bolts, install a backup washer and nut on all that can be reached.

Standup Block

Low Profile Block

Section C-04 Price List - Genoa Track

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Genoa Track Kit - consisting of (2) 1-1/4" x 8' black anodized T-tracks, (4) nylon track ends, (48) 5/16" x 2" bolts, screws for track ends. Specify if you want any nuts and washers for thru bolting. $  295.00 pkg
Standup Ball Bearing Blocks - with slide and spring stop - (2) 140.00 pair
Low Profile Wide Ball Bearing Blocks - with aluminum slides and spring stop - (2) 160.00 pair
Genoa Track Only - 1-1/4" black anodized aluminum

Section C-05
SPLIT COCKPIT FLOOR MODIFICATION

A method to gain easy access to the engine room on the Westsail 28 or 32 is to split the cockpit floor in half, and have both halves easily removable. This can be done on all the W28s, and the majority of the W32s, except for the early boats that had a molded tub for the cockpit. The standard removable floor is difficult to lift up, and heavy to handle, especially in a seaway.

Unbolt the floor of the cockpit and clean off the old caulking. Cut the floor in half crosswise across the beam of the boat. Attach a strip of wood or fiberglass to the underside of the cut on the forward half, so that the back half has a lip to seat on. Seal all of the exposed edges of the plywood core with epoxy resin, and paint. Use foam tape, obtainable at most auto stores or Home Depot as a gasket.

Clean off and smooth the lip on the bottom of the cockpit tub. Use carriage bolts with wingnuts on the lip to hold each half down. Another idea is to install long carriage bolts on each half just inside the lip, and a wood crossbar underneath to hold each half down.

The forward half, since it is over the top of the engine, can be kept secured down most of the time. It is the back half that should be readily available to be lifted and slid forward to gain ready access to the area just behind the engine.

Section C-06
COCKPIT FLOOR HATCH

I cannot take credit for this great addition to simplify engine room access on the boats, as I saw it on one of the Westsail 32s at a rendezvous. An aluminum hatch was installed in the floor of the cockpit to gain easy and immediate access to the engine, transmission, stuffing box, and storage in the back end of the engine room.

A hole was cut in the fiberglass floor of the cockpit, and one of the standard, aluminum frame, cabin top hatches was bolted in place, with the hinge side aft. Normally the hatch is just dropped down, and keeps out any small amounts of rainwater or splashes in the cockpit. If you are going offshore, the hatch can be dogged down watertight by reaching in from the engine room opening behind the companionway stairs. Some also have the provision to lock the hatch down from the outside. You will also gain additional light in the engine room when the hatch is dogged down, as these hatches have a plex center.

If you use the low profile design hatch, they are about 1" high. The teak strips usually found in the cockpit floor are 1/2" high. Teak strips should be attached to the plexiglass top to reinforce the hatch. and provide a non-slip surface. They can be installed with an appropriate caulking material. To install a hatch, simply cut an opening with a saber saw, trim back any teak strips to clear the outside of the aluminum frame, caulk, and bolt in place.

I have used the Nibo Model 1039 hatch, and a Vetus Planus hatch, both of which have an opening size of about 19" square. A Lewmar Low Profile Size 60 hatch is also a good choice. The outside of the frame is 22" square, and the cutout size is about 20" square. They are less than 1" high when closed, and have an aluminum frame, two clampdown levers, and smoked plexiglass center. The hatch allows easy access into the engine room, yet fits nicely on the floor of the cockpit. Other brands of aluminum hatches of about the same size are also available.

To install, start the cutout about 5" from the aft end of the cockpit wall and mark around the spigot of the hatch for a cutting line. Use a carbide blade in a saber saw to easily cut the fiberglass and plywood core of the cockpit floor. If you have the teak strips on the floor, after cutting out the opening, remove the small pieces at the aft end, and mark the forward end and sides to cut the rest of the teak. Use a small circular saw, router, or a chisel to cut the slats so that the flange fits flat on the fiberglass. Clean off the surface, drill 1/4" holes to fit the bolts, then caulk and bolt down. Put masking tape on the flange so that the caulking does not smear the aluminum. After cleaning up the excess caulking, pull the tape to achieve a smooth bead of caulking.

Contact bud@westsail.com for availability and cost of an appropriate aluminum hatch.

Section C-07
CABINTOP HATCHES

An alternative I have seen done is to replace the teak hatches on the cabintop with aluminum ones. The aluminum ones will seal better than the original teak ones, especially after the years have opened the teak seams, dried out the caulking on the plexiglass, and crazed or cracked the plexiglass.

The cabintop hatches have a molded boss on the cabintop, which is flat across the top surface, and should be 22-1/2" square on the inside, and 25-1/2" square on the outside. On the standard construction, a teak piece is set around the inside of the opening, and rises up above the molded boss. The teak hatch goes over this teak trim to form a waterbreak. If you decide to remove the teak hatch and replace it with an aluminum one, then shave off the teak trim to be flush with the molded boss, and seal the joint with caulking. You can then mount an aluminum hatch with a flat flange directly on top of the boss on the cabintop.

SKYLIGHT HATCH ON THE WESTSAIL 32

The main salon skylight hatch was put into the last deck mold Westsail built in 1977, about hull number 625. A teak skylight hatch with brass or stainless steel bars was used on this hatch opening. It is the same skylight hatch that was used on the Westsail 42 and 43 on the cabintop. It is also possible to have one of these skylight hatches installed on the older Westsail 32s by having a cutout made on the cabintop and a hatch frame and hatch installed. I have a drawing available to do this modification if you want to give more light and ventilation in the salon of a Westsail 32. The hatch would have to be built by a local woodworker, because they are no longer being made. I do have the drawing though. Alternatively, you could install a flat aluminum hatch with plex center.

Section C-08
BIMINI TOPS, DODGERS AND HARDTOPS

BIMINI TOP FOR SAILING

In the tropics it is important to have shade while sailing, as well as in port. To install a bimini that can be used while sailing with the mainsheet on the boomkin or across the cabintop, it can be attached to the boom gallows frame, and extend forward to attach to the dodger frame. If you do not use a dodger, another alternative is to extend the lifeline stanchions by the cockpit up to the desired height of the bimini, and put a three way socket fitting on the end. This will permit tubes to be run across the deck, and aft to the boom gallows wood. A piece of acrilan can be made up to create a sailing awning.

If you have a mainsheet traveler across the bridgedeck, then a bimini would have to be completely supported by the boom gallows. A frame attached to the gallows bar and made from tubing, with braces down to the gallows frame leg, and canvas across the tubing would seem to me to be the way to do it.

DODGERS

Since there are many designs for a dodger, and each boat has its unique problems because of previously installed equipment, it is best to have a local canvas maker fit one to your boat. I do have pictures available of some that have been made. The better ones have handholds built into the frame to have something to grab hold of when going forward, and also a brace extending from the aft legs down to the cabin back to give the frame rigidity. The cabin back fittings should have release pins in them to be able to fold the dodger down. A number of dodgers have also been built with removable bimini top, sides and aft ends to form a cockpit enclosure.

HARDTOPS

There are a few manufacturers that make fiberglass hardtops, attached to the tube frames, similar to the ones used for a fabric dodger. These can also have fabric installed around the front and sides.

Section C-09
LOOSE FOOTED STAYSAIL

Attached is a drawing of the location for a pair of tracks on the cabin top to fly the staysail without the boom. There have been a number of boats doing this, and it frees up the bow area to not have the boom to work around. The boat still tacks easily, as the amount the staysail sheet has to be let out and pulled in is short. 1-1/4" gray anodized aluminum T-track is used on the cabintop. It is an extruded T-track, with built in riser. I use the 1-1/4" size because it is the same as that used on the genoa track, and the track cars can be interchangeable. The track has 5/16" diameter countersunk holes every 4" for installation, and 3/8" holes between them for the stop pin on the track block. Black nylon end stops are supplied, and track blocks are available. A 4' long piece on each side is usually more than sufficient to do the job. To install it you can drill and tap the fiberglass cabintop, and install the 5/16" x 1-1/2" flat head bolts, using caulking, but no nuts on the underside. It can also be bolted through the cabin top, and use large washers and stainless nuts on the underside, if the fabric headliner can be pulled down to hide nuts under it. Otherwise, I can supply capnuts if they are going to be exposed.

Winches on the cabin top to sheet in the staysail are not absolutely necessary for most sailing conditions, as you can pull in the sheet without too much effort. Some boats do have sheet stoppers (also called a rope clutch) instead of cleats, and they let you take up slack in the sheet and still hold well. One of these would be needed on each side.

For self-tending, attach a single block to the clew of the staysail, and use one continuous sheet passing through the block on the clew and down both sides through the track blocks. Tighten the sheet on one side, and when you tack, the sail will move over to the other side by itself, and be sheeted in at the same angle. You can use the block removed from the bail on the boom, and probably the old staysail sheet will be long enough.

The location for the track can be either inboard or outboard of the handrail, depending on which deck model you have, and the clearance for the sheet to lead aft along the cabin top. You can try out the system before installing the track by simply tying a block to the handrail and going sailing in light to moderate conditions. Adjust the location of the block to get good sheeting angles both hard on the wind, and off the wind. Mark the location on the cabin top, and install the track so that you have easy travel to either location. The forward end of the track location should also allow for a storm jib to be used on the staysail stay.


Section C-09 Price List - Loose Footed Staysail

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Genoa Track Kit - consisting of (2) 1-1/4" x 4' black anodized T-tracks, (4) nylon track ends, (24) 5/16" x 1-1/2" FH bolts, screws for track ends. Specify if you want fasteners to thru-bolt the track. $  155.00 pkg
Standup Blocks - with stainless slide and spring stop - (2) 140.00 pair
Low Profile Blocks - with slides and spring stop - (2) 160.00 pair
Sheet Stoppers - (rope clutch) - (2) 110.00 pair

Section C-10
ANCHOR ROLLER

Additional hard plastic anchor rollers are available for all of the Westsail boats.

For the W-28 and W-32, the stainless steel frame that mounts to the side of the bowsprit is available, with a piece of allthread to go thru and pick up the roller on the other side. Simply cut out a piece of the platform to clear the new roller frame. The stainless frame is made of two pieces, a flat one that goes against the bowsprit, and a bent piece that forms the outside. These normally come welded together. The roller is only available in plastic, and there is a tube bushing down the center of the roller so you can tighten up the bolts and the roller will still turn freely. You can either put one roller setup on one side of the bowsprit, or put matching sets on either side with the bolts going thru to hold both.

For the W-42 and W-43, the large bronze roller with chain groove in it is no longer available, however I can have a plastic roller specially machined, with a stainless sleeve tube for a 1" OD shaft for the roller, and cotter pin holes to hold the shaft in place. Check the size of the hole in the stainless frame for the shaft to be sure of the size and length. Most used a 3-3/4" wide roller with a 1" dia. shaft, about 6" long.

The original frame and roller on the top of the caprail of the W-42 and W-43 to keep the chain from scraping the caprail is no longer available, however a similar one is available, with a stainless steel frame and plastic roller. Check for current pricing.


Section C-10 Price List - Anchor Rollers

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Frame for Anchor Rollers - Stainless steel frame with bolts and nuts $  160.00 each
Anchor Roller - Plastic anchor roller with SS sleeve bushing - 3" dia. x 3" wide 20.00 pkg
12" Threaded Rod and Locknuts - for mounting two anchor rollers 10.00 pkg

Section C-11
ANCHOR CHAIN, MOORING PENDANT, AND WINDLASS

WESTSAIL 42 AND 43

My experience is that the Westsail 42 and 43 are especially sensitive to adding too much weight forward. Since the stern of the boat has much fuller sections than the bow, then when the boat heels, the stern tends to rise up, and the bow to drop. In heavy seas the bow tends to dig in, and the boat becomes very wet. The boat can ride level without sails, and this bow-down condition is only noticed when sailing hard on the wind, especially in heavy seas. This condition is aggravated by carrying an excessive amount of chain forward. I would recommend carrying only about 100' of chain in the forward locker, and the rest nylon rode. The rest of the chain should be pulled back to the bilge compartment near the mast post, or additional chain can be carried in separate pieces, in sturdy plastic crates, that can be carried to the bow and shackled on if needed to set an additional anchor.

If you are carrying two heavy anchors on the forward roller, then when making passages, leave only one light anchor on the forward roller that is ready to go at a moments notice, and stow the other anchors aft someplace.

CHAIN SIZE

What would also help greatly would be to use high test chain, as it is stronger than proof coil or BBB chain, and you can go to a smaller size of chain, and still retain the same strength characteristics. For the W28 or W32 using 5/16" high test chain is appropriate. It has higher working and breaking strength and is lighter than proof or BBB. You only need about 60' or so of chain for normal anchoring, plus 300' of 5/8" nylon braid anchor rode.

5/16" high test , working load 3900 lbs., breaking strength 11,600 lbs., weight 1.1 lbs/ft. 3/8" BBB chain, working load 2650 lbs., breaking strength 11,000 lbs., weight 1.7 lbs/ft.

MOORING PENDANT LINE

The spare hole on the bobstay fitting was put there to allow the attachment of a mooring pendant. Fit a large shackle in the hole, and attach a nylon line to it that comes up over the anchor roller and onto the deck. This line can be tied to the chain with a rolling hitch after you have anchored, then let out chain until the pendant is taking the load, and the chain over the roller is loose and serves as a safety.

ELECTRIC ANCHOR WINDLASS ON W28 OR W32

Most of the smaller new electric windlasses are designed for 5/16" HT chain. Many also have a place to use a hand crank to be able to use the windlass manually. For the mounting, I would recommend making up a stainless mounting plate with sides going down the bowsprit. I believe that the electric wire coming out of the windlass is on the bottom, so the mounting plate needs to be slightly above the bowsprit to permit the wire to exit and go through a waterproof deck fitting. I would also recommend installing an 80 to 90 amp hour sealed battery right up in the upper corner of the anchor locker to operate the windlass. The heavy power cables will be very short, and the windlass motor will operate efficiently. Use #8 or #10 wires from the alternator charging circuit to keep this battery charged. This installation will also be less expensive than using long runs of battery cable from the engine room to the anchor locker. In addition, you will always have a spare battery in case of a failure of your engine starting battery.

Section D-01
HULL NUMBERS

Starting in 1974, a Federal Regulation required all boatbuilders to permanently mark the hull on the stern with a Hull Identification Number (or HIN). Each boatbuilder was issued a designator series of letters. For Westsail, it was WSS.

In the series of numbers molded in the hull, WSSF 0XXX XXXX, the WSSF refers to a factory finished boat, or WSSK in the case of a kit boat. The next four numbers are the hull number, starting with 0. The last four numbers are the month and year the hull was laminated.

Westsail did make some variations in the system, and used a WSSK3 designator for the Westsail 43 hull, and in some later models, added a 28, 32, 42, or 43 after the lamination date numbers.

The numbers should be about 3/8" high, except for the Westsail 32s molded at the Wrightsville Beach, NC plant. They have the numbers about 3/4" high. The numbers are located on the starboard stern, about 2' to 3' below the caprail.

Westsail Parts Company is keeping track of the full hull numbers on the boats built by Westsail. If we do not have your hull identification number on file, we would appreciate receiving it.

Section D-02
CENTERLINE BONDING AND HULL TO DECK JOINT

CENTERLINE BONDING OF THE HULL

If you have noticed cracking of the gelcoat on the centerline of the hull at the bow and stern, do not be too alarmed, as this is a cosmetic, and not structural, problem. Since the hulls on most of the boats were made in two pieces, and centerbonded together from the inside while the boat was still in the mold, the structural integrity is there, but the seam on the outside needed to be ground smooth, filled with fiberglass putty, and touched up with gelcoat. This putty tends to harden and not flex with age, and the gelcoat cracks or lifts. If you have noticed this condition, and it is prevalent on most boats, and want to cosmetically repair it, then fill the cracks with an epoxy putty, and touch up the gelcoat.

On the underwater portion, you will see this seam continue, and it also should be filled with epoxy putty, and sealed over with epoxy resin. On the Westsail 42 and 43, this seam also extends on the aft portion of the keel on either side, from just below the prop opening forward and down about six feet. This is because this was a third piece to the hull mold, and it was laminated separately, and attached when the hull halves were bonded together. This put the centerbond laminating seam on the sides of the hull where they could be reached and properly bonded together, instead of down deep in a narrow keel end where it would not have been possible to do a proper job of centerbonding. If the bottom paint shows signs of lifting or cracking along this seam, then scrape it out, fill with epoxy putty, and seal over with epoxy resin.

The later Westsail 32 hulls, from about number 625 on, were made in a one piece hull mold, and there is no indication of any centerline gelcoat crazing on these hulls.

HULL TO DECK JOINT

All of the Westsail boats, except for the early Westsail 32s made from the mold that was purchased from Kendall, have a hull to deck joint, as shown in the drawing below. This hull to deck joint was unique to the Westsail boats, and was designed to eliminate leaks and joint repairs so prevalent in fiberglass boats. The hull was laminated with a piece extending up to the top edge, then a fiberglass flange was molded onto the hull. When the deck was fastened to the hull, with caulking and bolts and screws, the piece sticking up was sanded off even with the deck flange. Then the teak caprail was installed over this seam, thereby sealing and covering it.

On the early Westsail 32s, up to about hull #120 or so, the joint was made with a wooden sheer clamp bonded to the inside top edge of the hull, and used as a flange to fasten down the deck. After the deck was set on the wooden edge with caulking, it was fastened down with screws, then the exterior edge between the hull and deck was filled with a polyester putty to seal the edge of the deck.

Typical hull to deck joint

Early Westsail 32 hull to deck joint

Section D-03
GELCOAT DEGRADATION WITH AGE

With age, gelcoat, which is after all a protective coating on the fiberglass, and gives it a color, will degrade. It begins to chalk, get porous, and craze in spiderweb patterns. This can be observed on the cabintop and decks, and on some hulls of most boats that have gelcoat that is now 25 to 30 years old. Above water, it is simply a cosmetic problem. Underwater, it has some additional consequences, and can manifest itself in osmotic blistering of the hull.

The majority of boats now need the gelcoat to be recoated, or covered with a linear polyurethane paint. Follow the manufacturers directions carefully using whatever product you choose. It is especially important to apply lots of priming coats to fill all of the voids and hairline cracks.

Here is the procedure that I would recommend. Sand the gelcoat well, and break out any loose chips. Fill any depressions with epoxy putty. Apply a good coat of the high build primer that is recommended to use with whatever finish paint you plan to apply. Sand the primer, and if any of the crazing shows through, apply another coat of primer, and sand again. Continue doing this, if necessary, until the surface is exactly the way you want it, but dull of course due to the primer and sanding. Then apply your top coat paint.

If you have noticed cracking of the gelcoat along the centerline of the hull at the bow and stern, do not be too alarmed, as this is cosmetic and not structural. Since the hull on most of the boats was made in two pieces, and centerbonded together from the inside while the boat was still in the mold, the structural integrity is there, but the seam on the outside needed to be ground smooth, filled with putty, and touched up with gelcoat. This putty tends to harden and not flex with age, and the gelcoat cracks or lifts. If you have noticed this condition, and it is prevalent on most boats, and want to cosmetically repair it, then fill the cracks with an epoxy putty, and touch up the gelcoat.

If you need to touchup the gelcoat, the majority of the boats used Ferro Light Ivory gelcoat, with a Camel Brown nonskid gelcoat. I can get quantities of it for you, but it will have to be toned down to compensate for the fading of the gelcoat.

Section D-04
CABINTOP NONSKID

If the molded nonskid on you cabintop is not looking good, plus getting very slippery due to age, you might want to consider recoating it with an epoxy paint, and using a sand grit type of additive to make a new non-skid surface. Be careful to not add too much grit to the epoxy paint, as you do not want to turn the cabintop into a giant sheet of sandpaper. One method we have used for years in the boatyard when building a one-off boat is as follows. Use a one part epoxy or polyurethane paint, and the grit you can buy in most marine chandleries, made by Z-Spar. Get a large salt shaker, or punch holes in the top of the can to make up a shaker so that you can evenly sprinkle the grit over the painted surface. Thoroughly clean the molded nonskid surface, and lightly sand it with a fine sandpaper or a nylon scouring pad.

I would recommend developing your skill at doing this procedure on a small area that is easily masked off, so the job does not get away from you. Mask off a section of the nonskid area with masking tape, then begin applying the paint with a roller or brush, and after a square foot or so, sprinkle the nonskid sand onto the paint. Distribute it as evenly as possible, then go on and apply the paint to another section. After it is all on, wait until the paint has set up, then lightly brush off any excess grit. Thin the paint slightly, and apply another coat of the paint to seal down the grit. After this dries, you can remove the masking tape. You should get both coats on during the same day, and remove the masking tape before it adheres too aggressively. Do not wait overnight, as the moisture during the evening will hinder the removal of the tape. With a little practice, you will be able to apply enough grit to give you a decent nonskid surface, but be easily cleaned, and not destroy clothing when you sit on the cabintop. When the paint needs recoating, simply clean the surface, mask it off again, and apply another coat of paint, slightly thinned out.

Another method that I have seen used is using a stipple roller with a thickened epoxy resin. This method raises a stippled surface on the nonskid area, and after the resin is cured, it is lightly sanded with a soft pad to remove the sharp peaks, then painted with an epoxy paint.

A third method is to add a compound to the paint, and roll it on. I am not sure of the name of the compound, but I understand it is a type of material used around swimming pools and other places where they want a nonskid walking surface.

Section D-05
OSMOTIC BLISTERING

With age, gelcoat, which is, after all, a protective coating on the fiberglass and gives it color, will degrade. It begins to chalk, get porous, and craze in spiderweb patterns. This can be observed on the cabintop and decks, and on some hulls of most boats that have gelcoat that is now 25 to 30 years old. Above water, it is simply a cosmetic problem. Underwater, it has some additional consequences, of which the principal one is osmotic blistering.

Westsails have not experienced a severe amount of underwater blistering of the hull, however I have seen some blistering on most of the boats. I firmly believe that all fiberglass boats will eventually blister, and that sometime in the life of the ownership of your boat, it would be a good idea to apply a protective barrier to the underwater surface to prevent the possibility of moisture getting under the gelcoat and causing blistering. Because the hull is solid fiberglass and the layup is so thick, and not cored with a thin outer skin, some surface blistering, of up to 1/8" to 3/16" deep, would not be considered a structural problem.

As water increasingly penetrates through the gelcoat, water vapor condenses in the small cavities of the laminate as distilled water. This water then reacts with chemicals contained in the fiberglass resin to form an acidic solution. When this solution achieves a certain concentration, a chain reaction takes place which is referred to as "osmosis". This acid tends to dilute itself by attracting water through the fine pores of the gelcoat by osmotic action. The resulting diluted solution increases in volume, as it requires more space, pushes against the gelcoat, and creates swellings. This is how the blisters typical of osmotic problems are formed on the underwater surfaces of fiberglass boats. Even the glasssfibers become partially damaged and delaminate, allowing the acid solution to creep and increase the area of its attack, and more chemical constituents are dissolved.

As you can understand, with the aging of the gelcoat, it becomes more porous, and consequently, even if you have never experienced any blisters in the past, that is no guarantee they will not begin one day on your boat. This process of self-destruction requires a remedial action on any fiberglass boat, sooner or later. I advise that when you are able to layup the boat for a period of time, then you haul out, remove the bottom paint, break any existing blisters, clean out the bilges, and let the hull dry out for at least two to three months. When the fiberglass is thoroughly dry, which can be checked with a moisture meter, then apply a barrier coat of 4 to 6 coats of an epoxy resin, and fresh bottom paint. You will have added a new coating to the bottom to prevent the water from penetrating into the resin of the fiberglass, for probably at least another 15 to 20 years.

Depending on your area it might take being put into a heated building, or tenting the boat and using a portable heater to properly dry the hull. During this drying out process, which may take many months, break any large blisters and clean them out. If you have very small, pimple type blisters, sand the hull with a disc sander with a soft pad to open them up, and clean the hull with acetone. Clean out the bilges, and remove any standing water. The hull needs to dry out from the inside as well. Check the moisture content of the fiberglass with a moisture meter, and when it is down to the recommended moisture level, the coating process can begin.

If you do not have blisters now, I would not recommend doing anything to the bottom except painting. Quite often the pimple type blisters are in the bottom paint only, and do not affect the gelcoat. Try scraping off some bottom paint to see if the gelcoat is still intact. If you do have extensive blistering, and decide to protect the entire bottom, the current accepted procedure is to remove all of the bottom paint, then let the hull dry out. The bottom paint can be removed with a chemical remover, sanding, or sandblasting. If you do sandblast, be sure the operator is experienced, and does not sandblast so much as to remove all of the gelcoat and rough up the fiberglass so as to cause the necessity to fill and fair the hull again. This is an extremely labor intensive process, and can get very expensive. It usually is not necessary in most cases. The gelcoat peeling machines also require extensive re-fairing of the hull, and I would not recommend that being done except as a last resort for extremely severe blistering, and only upon recommendation of a competent marine surveyor.

After the hull is dried, and all blisters cleaned out, coat the blistered areas with a layer of an epoxy resin, then fill with an epoxy putty. The hull should then be covered with a minimum of five coats of epoxy resin, rolled on with rollers. I prefer using a color tint in the resin, alternating with a light and dark colors to be able to visually see that the coatings are covering evenly. Gudgeon Brothers, in their West System epoxy treatment, also recommends an aluminum powder additive to create a more water resistant coating. After the epoxy treatment, apply the bottom paint best suited for your area. Be sure to clean out the bilges, and coat that area with two coats of epoxy paint.

Section D-06
TEAK DECKS, SEAM CAULKING AND PLUGS

CLEANING THE TEAK DECKS

I do not recommend using one of the harsh acid cleaners. They tend to remove the softer wood between the harder grain, and you wind up with grooves and a rough surface on the teak. I have used oxalic acid when necessary, and it works well.

You should scrub the teak well with a good detergent soap first. Then you need to get the black out, which is mold. You could use a bathroom mold cleaner, however a commercial mold cleaner does much better. One is Microban (www.microban.com), which you should be able to find at a janitorial supply company.

After that treatment, if you still need to remove some of the gray, use oxalic acid mixed with warm water. Paint on the oxalic acid on a sunny day, and let it dry. Then scrub off all of the crystals with water and a brush. After it dries, if there is still some gray left, then do the oxalic treatment again.

You are now ready to put on a sealer and finish of your choice.

DECK SEAM CAULKING AND PLUG REPAIR

If you have a teak deck overlay on top of the fiberglass deck, the time has come on most of the boats to renew the caulking in the seams. The original decking was 13/16" thick, with a 3/16" wide by 1/4" deep cut on one edge for the caulking seam. As the teak wears down over the years, the caulking no longer has a deep enough groove to hold it in place, and consequently it pulls out. Also, the plugs over the screws come out, and the screw heads show. A two part Thiokol polysulphide caulking was used originally, however I am now recommending a one part deck seam caulking, made by Teak Decking Systems from Florida, called SIS 440 to use for renewing or repairing the seams. I have available a complete explanation of the product and its application. It should be READ CAREFULLY, and WELL UNDERSTOOD prior to starting to repair the seams. I will add a few additional notes on to this procedure, to help with the job. The old caulking can be removed by using a hook scraper as described in the brochure, or a router or small circular saw. A small chisel also helps. I have also heard that some owners pull the screws first, and lift the boards off of the deck. The groove can then be cut deeper on a table saw, as was done originally. Then the boards can be laid down again.

When joining new seam caulking to existing caulking, cut the old caulking with a V shaped end. This will give better adhesion of the new caulking to the old. Drill and plug the screw holes after removing the seam caulking and re-grooving the seams, but prior to caulking them. When replacing the plugs, remove the old ones, and unscrew the self tapping screws. It will take a scrugun, or a slow speed reversible drill, with a good scrugun bit. Sometimes it is better to use a hand screwdriver to get the screw loosened, then the electric motor to remove it. Use the combination drill-countersink to deepen the hole so there is at least 5/16" depth of the countersink, but preferably 3/8". This will give the new plug good holding power. Use epoxy resin in the hole prior to setting the screw, and also to hold the plug. Line the grain of the plug up with the grain of the teak decking. After the resin is cured, shave off the excess plug with a sharp chisel. You are now ready to prime and caulk the seams.

TEAK DECK SEAM CAULKING COSTS

Teak Decking Systems recommends using a fine line masking tape in the bottom of the seam, so that the caulking sticks to the board, but not to the deck. This permits the boards to expand and contract, so the caulking will not pull away from the seams. Use masking tape on either side of the deck seams after they are cleaned and ready to caulk. This will prevent the caulking from embedding itself in the rough grain of the teak, and causing excessive sanding of the deck to remove it. Force the caulking down into the seams with a putty knife to make sure they are well filled.

It would be a good idea to also caulk around the inner and outer edges of the teak deck, between it and the fiberglass deck, to prevent water from getting under the teak. Use masking tape on the edge of the teak, and on the fiberglass to define a good seam, and lay on a bead of caulking. Smooth it down with a rounded tool or your finger, and just before it has cured, pull the tape.

After the caulk has cured properly, trim off any excess with a sharp chisel or razor blade, and then sand the decks. A power sander with a foam soft pad works well, as it will not dig into the deck as easily as a belt sander.

SELF TAPPING SCREWS TO HOLD THE DECK DOWN

It is necessary to use self tapping screws (sometimes called sheet metal screws) to fasten into fiberglass. These were used throughout the construction of the Westsail boats, even on wood to wood and metal to wood fastening. We used a pan head screw (also called stove head screws) because the edges of the screw will bite into the teak, but not spread it like a flat head screw with a taper on the underside would do. The flat head screws tend to start a crack around each hole, while the pan head screws will not. It is also necessary to use a tapered drill bit with a countersink on it, so that the hole in the wood will be large enough so the sheet metal screw will bite into the fiberglass and pull the wood down to it. The countersink will make the hole necessary to cover the screw with a bung. That is the reason you will find pan head self tapping screws on most of the Westsail boat construction.

ANOTHER POSSIBLE PROCEDURE

Here is another procedure one owner did to renew his teak decking.

I labeled and removed the existing deck in sections (to keep from being overwhelmed). I then resurfaced the boards in a bench planer to 1/2", and cut new caulking grooves. I then adhered the boards with Teak Decking Systems epoxy using the original screws with fender washers to clamp the boards in place. I then removed the screws, filled the holes with epoxy and teak bungs, and caulked the seams with SIS 440 seam caulking.

Cost was about $500 and maybe 100 man-hours. I was fortunate I had no deck delamination except about an inch around the deck fills and a small area where I found a chunk of debris under the top skin. Visit (teakdecking.com).

Section D-06 Price List - Deck Seam Caulking and Plug Repair

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Seam Repair Caulking - "Teak Decking Systms" SIS 440 Cartridge $  14.00 each
Teak Plug Repair Kit: 100 - #10 x 1" pan head self tapping stainless screws, 100 - 3/8" teak plugs 21.00 pkg

Section D-07
FIBERGLASS GUDGEONS

Fiberglass gudgeons were used on most of the Westsail 32s, and all of the Westsail 28s. They have proved to be very strong, with virtually no problems. I can supply the 1-1/4" bronze pin that was used with the fiberglass gudgeon, however the mold for the gudgeons themselves is no longer available. If you want to make some, here is the procedure.

  1. Mark the location on the hull that corresponds with the three pin slots in the rudder.
  2. If you are replacing old gudgeons, fill all holes with epoxy putty and smooth over.
  3. Using filament wound fiberglass tube that fits the bronze pins, cut the tube in three pieces, the lengths of the slots in the rudder. Slip them onto a waxed PVC pipe or wood dowel, and clamp to the stern of the boat where the gudgeons would be. The edge of the tubes should be approximately 1-3/4" from the stern of the hull. Mark the outline of the gudgeons on the hull with a felt marker pen.
  4. Tape clear plastic sheets to the hull to protect it, then remove the pipe and fiberglass tubes.
  5. Layup two layers of mat and roving against the hull and trim to the marked lines.
  6. Re-clamp the pipe in place, with edge of the tubes just touching the fiberglass layup. Fill in the gap between the tubes and the gudgeon layup with small pieces of mat and roving.
  7. Bond over the tubes with 3 or 4 more layers of mat and roving, trimming to the marked lines.
  8. Remove the gudgeons, trim and grind smooth, then drill holes to bolt them to the hull with bronze bolts. Install with lots of caulking.
  9. Install the rudder with the bronze pins, with plastic washer top and bottom of each pin between the rudder pocket and the gudgeon to take up any vertical play.

If you have an experienced person doing the fiberglassing, this job can be accomplished in less than a day, and on the second day they can be trimmed, bolted, and the rudder hung.

If you need the 1-1/4" bronze pins, fiberglass tube, or plastic washers, please contact Westsail Parts Company.

W32 Lower Fiberglass Gudgeons

W32 Upper Fiberglass Gudgeon

Section D-07 Price List - Rudder Pintal Pins

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Rudder Pintal Pins (W28) - 1" x 10" bronze with bronze fasteners $  140.00 each
Rudder Pintal Pins (W32) - 1-1/4" x 11-1/2" bronze with bronze fasteners 150.00 each

Section D-08
WESTSAIL 32 STAINLESS PINTALS AND GUDGEONS

The first 100 or so Westsail 32s had stainless steel pintals and gudgeons on the rudder. Some of the first boats had the pin welded to the rudder pintal, but most had a loose pin held in with cotter pins. The three pintals for the rudder were identical, and the two lower gudgeons on the hull matched each other. It has been some time since I have had any made up, and if you need some, I would need to get a current estimate of the cost.

There should be a zinc on each of the pintals to protect them from electrolysis. What usually gets eaten up first is the stainless steel locknuts, or the bolts and washers. Then the area around the mounting holes gets eaten out. Remove the bolts and check the condition of the holes in the plates. If you do not want to replace them, an alternative, if the electrolysis damage is only around the mounting holes, would be to cut off the strap ends and have new ones welded on, providing the tube and bent end is still in good condition. Quite often you may find that the center of the stainless bolts have been eaten away by galvanic action, but the head of the bolt, and the nut, may still appear to be in good condition. It may be a wise idea to periodically remove one of the bolts to check for this condition.

The newer design of pintal and gudgeon uses a rudder that has pockets molded into one side to hold a bronze pin, and the gudgeon is made of fiberglass, with a fiberglass tube in it. It is possible to have a rudder with the pocket molded into it, but with the stainless steel pintal and gudgeon. I have seen some of this construction, as in the changeover, Westsail used up a supply of the stainless pintals and gudgeons they had in stock.

Be sure to replace the zinc on each pintal at every haulout, or sooner if you notice excessive galvanic action.

Section D-09
RUDDER WASHERS AND GUDGEON PLAY

RUDDER WASHERS

I have found a source on sheet polyethylene to make new washers to use on the rudder installations on all the boats. The washers are used to take up the gap between the gudgeons and the rudder, to keep the rudder from banging while in the water. Since the rudders are made of fiberglass with a foam core, they will float up when in the water, and consequently washers are needed at both ends of at least one pintal pin to take up the gap and prevent the rudder from moving up and down.

On the W42 and W43, the washers are installed on the upper end, between the rudder and the hull, as well as on the gudgeon end. If you are missing needed washers, and do not want to remove the rudder to install them, the plastic washer can be cut, twisted open, and forced around the pintal or the rudder post.

The washers are available in three sizes, and two thicknesses. The early Westsail 32s had stainless steel pintals and gudgeons, and the pins are 15/16" diameter. These washers are 1" ID x 2" OD. The majority of the W32s and the W28s have fiberglass gudgeons and bronze pins, and these pins are 1-1/4" diameter. These washers are 1-3/8" ID x 2-1/4" OD. The W42 and W43 use a 2-3/8" diameter rudder post, and these washers are 2-3/8" ID x 3-1/2" OD.

The material I have available is 1/16" thick, and also some 1/4" thick. Specify what thickness you want, and how many of each.

WEAR ON FIBERGLASS GUDGEONS

The majority of the Westsail 32s and 28s have fiberglass gudgeons bolted to the hull, and bronze pins bolted to the rudder. Eventually the bronze pins will wear the fiberglass tube in the gudgeon.

If you are noticing some excessive play in the rudder gudgeons there is not too much you can do, but here are some suggestions.

One method would be to put a thin sheet of Mylar wrapped around the pins to take up any wear. Another possible fix I came up with is when the boat is hauled, put some tape around the pins under the gudgeons, and pour some thickened epoxy resin around the pins to fill the gaps. When the epoxy is just getting hard, move the rudder back and forth to make sure the resin does not stick to the pins. That should fill in the worn areas.

Section D-09 Price List - Rudder Washers

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
W28 bronze pins - 1" x 10" - machined and with fasteners (each) $  140.00 each
W32 bronze pins - 1-1/4" x 11-1/2" - machined and with fasteners (each) 150.00 each
Plastic Rudder Washers - Specify size, thickness, and number you need 0.75 each

Section D-10
WESTSAIL RUDDERS

The early Westsail 32s had a rudder with a rounded bottom trailing edge, and was made with fiberglass skins, and filled with a fiberglass mishmash putty made with resin and asbestos powder. The rudder was redesigned after hull number 100, and the trailing edge was made parallel to the leading edge, and more area was added to the bottom aft edge of the rudder. The pockets and bronze pins were also designed into this rudder.

The Westsail 28 and 32s after number 100 both have rudders with a foam core and fiberglass skins. They were made in a split mold, and the edges needed smoothing and touching up with putty and gelcoat. You may have noticed cracking of the gelcoat on the centerline, but do not be too alarmed as this is cosmetic and not structural. The seam on the outside needed to be ground smooth, filled with putty, and touched up with gelcoat. This putty tends to harden and not flex with age, and the gelcoat cracks or lifts. If you have noticed this condition, and it is prevalent on most boats, and want to cosmetically repair it, then fill the cracks with an epoxy putty, and touch up the gelcoat.

Some blistering is usually experienced on the fiberglass skins of the rudder. They can be cut out, the foam allowed to dry, then apply a barrier coat of epoxy resin, and fresh bottom paint.

The Westsail 42 and 43 have a 2-3/8" OD stainless pipe shaft, with a steel reinforcing plate welded to it. This was set in a mold and a foam fill with fiberglass skin was added around this core. I have heard of two instances of the foam coming loose from the core due to the boat being grounded, and the fiberglass rudder being pounded up by the boat beating on the bottom. I also know of one instance of the plate being bent, and the weld broken due to a side load on a grounding. For the repair to this condition, cut away just enough of the skin and core to be able to reach the area to be welded. Pour-in-place foam can be used to build up the rudder, and a new fiberglass patch done on the skin.

Keep a zinc on the bronze gudgeon of the W42 and W43 to prevent electrolysis. Keep plastic washers between the rudder and the hull to take up any space and prevent the rudder from banging up and down.

The W28 and W32 both have a stainless steel box on the upper end to transfer the steering load of the tiller. The rudder cheeks were made from ash originally, but can also be made of teak, or a synthetic material such as Starboard. They are not structural, as the steel box under them transfers the rudder load to the tiller. You should check the bolts going thru the cheekplates and rudder that they are snug, without being too loose or too tight. You might want to remove all of the bolts, take the cheek plates and box off, and repair any cracks, refinish the cheek plates, the reinstall with caulking under the cheek plates. Be sure and seal the inside surfaces of the cheek plates to prevent rot in them. If you want to replace them, I have the drawing of their construction, or you can copy the existing one. If the tiller is loose in the stainless box, glue a piece of formica on either side of the tiller to shim it tight.

I do have replacement tillers available for the W28 and W32, as well as the washers used in the gudgeons.


W42 Rudder

Section D-11
RUDDER LINE PREVENTER

A safety item that Westsail did install on a few of the Westsail 28s and W32s was a tab between the aft end of the hull and the front edge of the rudder to close the bottom of the gap between them. This gap is a place for any line or rope you run over to get caught up into, and cause problems. If you are in an area with lobster or crab traps, and run over the float, the poly line runs down along the bottom of the keel, then hooks up into the gap, and will slow down, or stop the boat. There is also the danger of the line being caught up into the prop. I have talked to many owners who have had this experience, with some hair raising tales of trying to get the rope cleared out, especially in rough sea conditions.

An easily installed item, this tab across the gap will serve to prevent the line from hooking into the rudder, and the line should slide off the rear end of the rudder. Since the bottom of the rudder is set about 1" to 2" above the bottom of the keel, a straight tab on the underside of the keel will work while going forward, but not while going astern. A preferable alternative is to put the tab on the side of the keel, extending back to just touch the rudder.

Usually this tab was made of fiberglass, and attached to the hull with self-tapping screws. If you are going to install one on your next haulout, you can easily make the tab from a broken fiberglass sail batten, or from a scrap piece of fiberglass, about 1/8" thick, 2" wide, and 8" to 9" long. Attach it to the hullside, with the back end touching the rudder. If the tab is 1/8" fiberglass it should bend easily as the rudder is turned. If you prefer putting the tab on the bottom of the keel, make it from a piece of stainless or brass strip, and bend it so that the part by the rudder just touches the bottom of the rudder. You do not want to have a gap on the underside of the rudder, as a line can get in while going astern, and it would be impossible to remove without cutting the line. Use some caulking under the self-tapping screws when installing the tab.


Rudder Line Preventer

Section D-12
TILLERS

The wooden tillers used on the Westsail 28 and 32 were laminated mahogany and ash, and if left to weather without a cover or good varnish protection, will eventually delaminate as the glue breaks down. If this is happening, and the wood is still sound, remove all of the old varnish, apply at least two coats of saturating epoxy resin, then revarnish.

Carefully check the end of the tiller periodically to make sure rot has not started at the end inside the rudder. You will need to remove the 1/2" bolt holding the tiller to the rudder, and pull the tiller out. There is a steel box that the tiller slips into, and if the tiller is not snug in the box, you will have excess play in the tiller, and it will enlarge the hole on the tiller pivot. Add pieces of formica to the sides of the tiller to get it to fit snug into the steel box.

I recommend formica for shims because it is thin, and easily cut and glued in place. The shim should not be a small round disk, but a rectangular piece glued to the sides of the tiller that extends to the ends of the stainless steel box on the rudder. That way you get a good bearing surface to take the tiller to rudder loads. Put in enough shim thickness to eliminate any side play between the tiller and rudder box. Tighten up the locknut on the tiller attachment bolt just enough so that the tiller will stay at any place you move it, without falling back down to the lowest position.

The rudder cheeks were originally made from ash, but can also be made of teak, or any other available wood. They are not structural, as the steel box under them transfers the rudder load to the tiller. A number of owners have made the cheeks from Starboard plastic material, and they should never have to be replaced again.

I do have new tillers available, and they are laminated mahogany and ash, completely finished, and coated with varnish. If you prefer, I can supply the tiller without varnish, if you want to coat it with saturating epoxy resin prior to varnishing it.

The Westsail 32 tiller is 3" wide x 4" high at the base, and 70" long, tapering down to 1-1/2" at the end. The Westsail 28 tiller 2-1/2" wide x 3-1/2" high at the base, and 66" long, tapering down to 1-1/2" at end. Both have a crown in the tiller, and are laminated mahogany and ash.

Section D-12 Price List - Replacement Tillers

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
W28 or W32 Tiller - Laminated mahogany and ash varnished $  380.00 each
W28 or W32 Tiller - Laminated mahogany and ash not varnished 325.00 each
Tiller Shipping - Approximate cost to the East Coast by FedEx Ground 40.00 each

Section D-13
AUTOPILOT INSTALLATION ON WESTSAIL 32

A tiller operated autopilot will work well on the Westsail 32, and many owners use a Simrad TP-32 tillerpilot. Dave King also had good luck using a new Raymarine SPX-5 tiller pilot on his single handed victory in the race from San Francisco to Hawaii in 2010.

Despite the instructions as to the installation location on most of the tiller mounted autopilots, it should be moved further forward on the tiller to gain more force, with less movement. The recommendation is usually to mount the pilot 18" ahead of the rudder. Since the rudder on the Westsail 32 is tilted aft, then use the waterline location where the rudder leaves the water as the starting point for measuring the 18", and not where the tiller is attached to the rudder. The outboard end should be mounted on the caprail, just about where it starts to dip down. It can also be attached to the leg of the boom gallows, which is at about the same position. A 5" to 6" extension of the drive rod will be required, which can be obtained from the makers of the autopilots. For the Simrad TP-32 autopilot, order the PRE-150 extension with it.

If you have one of the Tillermaster autopilots, the company is no longer in business, and the shop that used to service them is no longer around. I do have a copy of the original installation and service manual if you need a copy.

Caprail mount of Simrad TP-32Autopilot on W32

Alternate mount on boom gallows of W32

Section D-14
BALLAST

Most of the early Westsail 32 boats built were ballasted with 2000 pounds of lead pigs and 5000 pounds of steel punchings, cast in place with fiberglass resin, then bonded over with two layers of mat and roving. Some boats had 5500 pounds of steel, and of course some had all lead instead of a combination of lead and steel. These used lead shot as the last 5000 pounds.

In late 1974 Westsail made up molds to cast the lead in three large blocks, which were put in the hull, and the spaces around them filled with resin. Displacement was considered to be 20,000 pounds, with the boat floating just above the lower waterline mark when light. Most people put in an additional 2,000 to 3,000 pounds of gear and supplies, and the boats floated with the boot top submerged. Many owners have raised the boot top by the width of the stripe.

On the Westsail 32 you can usually tell which ballasting arrangement was done by the space below the small hatch in the forward cabin. If the ballast level is up close to the floor, say about 2" or less, it is the combination lead and steel ballast. If the space is about 4", it is the all lead ballast, using pigs and lead shot, cast in place with resin. If you can see the V of the hull below the hatch, you have the three piece cast lead ballast in the boat.

The Westsail 42s were primarily ballasted with 10,000 pounds of steel punchings, encapsulated with resin, and bonded over. Some of the boats were ballasted with lead pigs and lead shot if ordered that way. Sometimes a piece of plywood was put on top of the ballast prior to bonding over. There is no real way to determine which ballasting arrangement was used on the Westsail 42.

Most of the Westsail 43s were ballasted with 10,000 pounds of lead pigs and lead shot.

All of the Westsail 28s were ballasted with lead. The first few Westsail 28s were ballasted with 3500 pounds of lead, but it proved to not be enough ballast, so then 4200 pounds was used. This changed the displacement of 9500 pounds shown on the first brochures to 13,500 pounds which was on the later brochures. The waterline stripe was also raised, as the boat sat 4" deeper in the water, and changed the draft from 4' to 4'-4".

There have been some owners noting rusty water in the bilge, and this may be from a fracture in the layers of fiberglass bonded over the ballast. It would be a good idea to clean out the bilges, and seal any fractures with epoxy resin or putty, and paint the bilge area with epoxy resin to prevent water intrusion.

BALLAST LOCATION


Section E-01
ICEBOX INSULATION

The standard iceboxes in the Westsail boats were made from a molded fiberglass liner, onto which 2" to 3" of urethane foam was attached to the outside of the liner, then it was set into the plywood cabinet. On some of the early boats, the urethane insulation was in sheets, stuck to the box with fiberglass putty. On later boats, Westsail changed to spraying the liner with urethane foam, letting it grow and cure, then shaving off the excess to fit into the cabinet. In some cases, the foam was covered with aluminum foil, then with a plastic sheet before setting it into the box. This helps as a radiation and moisture barrier. A 3/4" delrin drain was installed in the lower corner as a water drain.

The top of the counter around the box is 1/2" plywood, covered with formica, and was not normally insulated. The lids were usually plywood, without insulation, or a molded plastic insert, filled with foam, and attached to the lid. The insulation on the boxes was fairly good, however for a proper refrigeration system, additional insulation usually needs to be installed. If you use it carefully, spray cans of insulating foam can be used to fill in the voids, or you can use pieces of block foam, and fill around them with the spray can foam.

To improve the insulation against the hull behind the icebox, cut an access hole in the countertop, outboard along the hull side (inside of the locker), and check to see if the foam extends out to the hull. If the outboard top of the icebox is not accessible to drill the access holes, you can cut them in the bulkhead on the forward side of the icebox, inside the cabinet above the dinette seat, and against the hullside. Also cut an access hole at the bottom of the end of the cabinet just above the floor to check the insulation under the box. If either area is lacking insulation out to the hullside, it can be added using spray cans of urethane foam, which can be purchased at any building supply store. Attach a long tube to the spray can, and start filling the foam from the center, and work out to the edges. Be sure to put some plywood blocking around the drain hose to keep it clear. Some spun fiberglass can be stuffed around the drain fitting, to be easily removable for servicing the hose.

Make sure the underside of the top is insulated outboard of the opening lids. You can use a sheet of urethane foam, 2" to 3" thick, cut to fit, with formica glued to it as a finished surface. The corners can be caulked with a white polyurethane caulking to finish the job neatly. Use masking tape on the corners to outline the seam before caulking, then smooth the caulk, and pull the tape to obtain a neat caulking job. I have also seen some people block off part of the curved end inside the box using foam covered with formica, glued in place with caulking, and having the seams caulked.

If urethane foam in sheets is not readily available to you, cut the formica to make the insert pieces, tape the pieces together, and set in a temporary frame of 2"x 4" lumber to hold them. Use a spray can of foam to fill the insert, then trim off the excess, and install in the box with white polyurethane caulking.

On one boat I saw, the owner had stainless steel wire baskets made up to fit into the box to store his food, yet have it easily accessible. He had these made up to his patterns by a place that makes shopping carts for supermarkets. One basket fit on top of another, and filled the box neatly.

Section E-02
NSULATION FOR HULL AND CABIN

For a truly comfortable boat in both extremely hot and cold climates, it is important to insulate the hull and inside the bulwarks to prevent condensation in cold weather, and keep the boat cooler in hot weather. When the heat from the cabin gets up into the cold bulwark, the moisture condenses into water droplets and runs down the inside of the hull.

The bulwarks can be insulated using pink fiberglass insulation that is available at any building supply store. It is usually 4" thick, and can be cut into 4" wide strips, then stuffed up into the bulwarks to insulate them. It is easily removed if it is necessary to reach inside the bulwarks at a later date.

For insulation of the hull sides, and inside all of the lockers, we used a closed cell polyethylene insulation, 1/4" thick, skinned on both sides. It came in rolls that are 4' wide, and can be cut with a scissors or razor blade. It glues in place with a special contact type adhesive. The insulation goes by the trade name of Volan 5A or Ethafoam. The adhesive is made by 3M, and is their product number 4693. At the hull to deck joint it should be cut so that it comes up the hull side and continues onto the underside of the deck, so as to block off the bulwark and insulate the side decks. The insulation forms a smooth, clean and soft surface inside all of the lockers, instead of rough fiberglass. The skinned surface prevents crumbling of the insulation inside the lockers.

Ethafoam can be purchased from Bob's Foam Factory, 4055 Pestana Place, Fremont, CA 94538 Phone 510-657-2420 . www.bobsfoam.com

The cabin top and under the foredeck usually already have foam backed vinyl insulation, or wood slats, installed over 3/8" plywood furring strips. If you are replacing the headliner, put the insulation between the furring strips, then install the headliner material.

The hull sides above the berths usually have wood slats installed over plywood furring strips bonded to the hull. Remove the slats and slip pieces of the insulation between the furring strips, then reinstall the wood slats.

Section E-03
PROPANE TANK LOCATION

The propane tanks can be stored either in the aft end of the cockpit, with a box over them, or on the cabin top ahead of the sliding hatch inside a box. I have a drawing available of the construction of the cabin top box. Another place I have seen them stored is in PVC tubes mounted on the caprails inside the boom gallows frame legs. If you can find large diameter PVC sewer pipe, you can make a nice holder for the vertical tanks.

The later Westsail 32 deck mold had a seat locker on the port side, with a sealed fiberglass compartment, that was often used as a propane storage locker. There was no molded fiberglass propane locker for the W-42. There was one for the W-43 lazarette locker.

The propane tanks can be stored either on the aft end of the deck with a box over them, or inside the lazarette compartment if you seal off a portion of it. One method to provide a sealed compartment is to use a large diameter PVC sewer pipe to make a nice holder for the vertical tanks. Many owners are now using the smaller sized vertical aluminum propane tanks, of about 8" in diameter. If you can find PVC sewer pipe with end caps of 9" in diameter, they can be used as sealed containers. A drain hole in the bottom, with plastic thruhull fitting, and a hose lead overboard will properly safeguard the tanks in the event of leakage. Using two or three of these tanks should provide sufficient reserve capacity.


Propane tanks on boomkin frame

Section E-04
SHIPMATE STOVE BURNERS AND CONVERSION TO PROPANE

I recently received word that some replacement burners are available for the Shipmate kerosene burners. These burners are a direct replacement on Shipmate, Seaward, Optimus Princess, Hillerange and Force Ten stoves and heaters. They are selling them for $115.00 ea. They also have repair kits for the existing kerosene and alcohol burners for $29.95. Contact Bob and Shirlene Thompson, A&H Enterprise, 714-941-9200 or www.packstoves.com

CONVERSION TO PROPANE

I have had a number of owners call me about converting their Shipmate kerosene stove to use with propane. Shipmate used to have these kits available, as they made the stoves with various burners, using the same stainless steel shell. Unfortunately, Shipmate is no longer in business, and the conversion kits are not available. I have heard of one possible solution to the conversion question, from a Westsail owner on the Central California coast, with an update from another owner who did this in 1994, and said that the stove has worked flawlessly ever since.

It seems that the kerosene burner will operate with propane, if the orifice is opened up to the proper size for the propane flame. A number 74 (.0225") drill bit is said to be the correct size. It will open up the orifice enough to get a flame of about 4000 BTU using propane, which will boil a quart of water in about 7 minutes. This is about as far as you want to open it up, for if you open it up more, you will get some yellow flame, which will make for dirty pots.

You should remove the kerosene tank and hose, purge the system of kerosene with compressed air, and drill out the brass orifices located inside the burner assembly with the #74 drill bit. Remove the flame diffuser and you can see down into the burner where there is a square nut with a tiny hole in it. You need to remove the square nut and VERY CAREFULLY drill the hole out. The drill is so fine that it's VERY easy to break. One owner slipped the drill bit into an X-ACTO knife handle and drilled out the orifices by hand.

You need to go to a store that specializes in tools for machine shops. Drill bit size #74 is .0225" diameter. Google "drill bit sizes" and you will find a number of sources.

You may also need to replace any rubber or fiber gaskets with copper ones, as the propane burns much hotter than the kerosene or alcohol. The owner that did the conversion commented that when he did the conversion, he found that the burner control valves leaked (not good!), so he went one step further. He completely dissasembled the burners, plugged the valve stems (1/4-inch pipe plug) and plumbed the burners with 1/4-inch copper tube and flare fittings. He added 1/4-turn gas valves to the front of the stove to control the burners and oven.

Hooking up a propane hose and tank, with regulator, will make a simple stove conversion. Of course, the stove thermostat will not be accurate, although most of the Shipmate stoves did not have thermostat oven control, and instead used a thermometer to check the temperature. If you want, a safety thermocouple can be purchased and installed in the line in case the burner goes out, as it will shut off the gas. These should be able to be obtained from a trailer supply store that sell parts for propane stoves.

Section F-01
WESTSAIL 32 BROKEN ENGINE MOUNT BRACKETS

The single biggest problem for the Westsail 32 engine installation seems to be excessive engine vibration leading to broken mounting brackets, failed engine mounts, excessively worn shaft bearings, transmission bearing damage and exhaust system failures. The majority of the broken mounting brackets have occurred on the Volvo 2 and 3 cylinder models because the original Volvo brackets were replaced by ones designed and built by Westsail.

The problem goes back to the fiberglass engine bed pan installed in the boat. On the first two hundred or so boats, there were three different engine pans built, one each for the Volvo 2 and 3 cylinder engines, and one for the Perkins. The pan ended with a flange just above the mounting flats, and was bonded to the hull on both sides and across the engine room bulkhead. To my knowledge, there were no problems with these boats. During the latter part of 1974 a new engine room liner was designed that incorporated the engine pan, fuel tank shelves, battery and water heater shelves. This liner was designed with the engine mounting flats for the Perkins with the Borg Warner 72 transmission. This engine has rear mounts raised above the front mounts by about 6", and are spaced at 22" apart. This mounting arrangement would not work on a Volvo with the factory brackets at 16" on centers, and equal level forward and aft. Westsail designed and built their own mounting brackets for both Volvo engines to bridge out and reach the new mounting flats.

The problem with this approach was that it changed the dynamic harmonics of the engine while running, and caused much more vibration than when the factory original brackets were used. These brackets have been breaking, causing subsequent transmission problems, worn shaft bearings, etc. This excess vibration has also caused much of the broken exhaust system problems.

In my opinion, a large contributing factor to the problem of excessive vibration lies in the fact that in using the full engine room liner, the pan itself is not attached to the hull immediately around the areas of the engine mounts, permitting the pan to vibrate and further aggravate the dynamic harmonics problem. The liner is attached to the hull above the fuel tank shelves, and across the engine room bulkhead, but otherwise suspended above the hull.

In the area just above the engine bed flats there is a layup of probably 2 mats and 2 rovings, or about 3/16" thick. This is plenty strong, but it is flexible. In the area of the flats there is plywood reinforcement for the mounts, but not so in the area above the flats that runs up the hull sides. Part of that area is cut out for the cockpit drain seacocks and the engine water inlet seacock, and the gap between the pan and hull can be seen. If that area is firmly attached to the hull, then the hull itself will absorb the vibration, as was the case with the original 3 engine pans, and will let the engine run smoother and minimize the broken bracket problem. The engine will also be able to be aligned with the shaft properly, and reduce wear on the shaft bearing and stress on the transmission seals and bearings.

Now for the method of fixing the existing problem. I would recommend drilling a few holes of 2" to 2-1/2" in diameter with a holesaw on the pan liner just above the mounting flat area. Make sure the pilot drill for the holesaw doesn't go through the hull. The void between the pan and hull should be bonded together with fiberglass mat and cloth. Use epoxy resin rather than polyester resin, as it will adhere better to the cured fiberglass. Clean the areas as well as possible by grinding and using acetone, and sand the gelcoat for 2" or so around each hole made. Cut mat and cloth strips about 3" wide and 9" to 12" long, saturate with catalyzed resin, roll it up into a tube, and stuff it into the hole and push it back up into the gap with a thin stick. Continue doing this until the gap is filled. Put the cut piece of pan material back onto the hole, and lock with a small patch around the plug. This will key in the pan around the mount area. Smooth off, and touch up with paint to finish the job.

If the engine has not been removed, the drilling of the holes will be the most difficult part. Use a right angle drill attachment if available, a series of smaller holes, chisel, hacksaw blade, etc., just to get holes large enough to work through. The main thing is to get holes cut through the pan sides so that it can be firmly attached to the hull. Do not cut away too much pan so as to weaken the mount. Do not use foam for this job, as you will not get the structural strength needed. A filling of resin with shredded mat and powder filler can be used, with mat to give it strength.

I would recommend this job be done on all engine installations, even though the Perkins runs smooth enough not to have experienced the broken bracket problems.


Section F-02
ENGINE MOUNTS

If you have been noticing excessive vibration while running your engine, it is probably time to check the engine mounts. They are set in a rubber donut, and if they are 10 years old, or older, you might want to consider replacing them. At the same time, if you have a Westsail 32 with the full engine room liner, you might also want to consider bonding the pan to the hull to eliminate this cause of excessive vibration.

The Volvo used two different types of engine mounts, and one is an industry standard that I can get. The other is a Volvo special and has to be ordered from Volvo, and hopefully they still stock them (and trust me, they are expensive), or otherwise it is necessary to convert over to the industry standard type.

The standard type has an aluminum base (or sometimes steel) with a threaded stud mounted in a rubber donut and sticking up, with two locking nuts on the stud. The engine mounting bracket goes between the two nuts, and you can adjust the vertical height by moving the nuts up or down. The mounting bolt spacing of this type of mount is 4", and the bottom nut is about 1-1/2" from the base. Other models have the bottom nut up to 2" from the base.

The special Volvo mount had a steel cup over the rubber donut, with a stud and a nut on top. There is no provision for easy adjustment, and shims between the bracket and the steel cup have to be used to get the adjustment. The mounting bolt spacing of this type of mount is about 4-1/2", and on some MD3B engines, a two donut mount was used on the front. If you have this type, and do not want to convert, contact a Volvo dealer, and have him try to order them for you.

If you want to convert, lift the engine up, and make up 1/2" thick aluminum or steel plates, with holes to fit the present bolts holding the Volvo mounts to the engine pan. You can then drill and tap into these plates to use 3/8" bolts to hold down the new mounts at 4" centers. These plates should be wide enough to rotate the mount slightly to miss the plate mounting bolts. You may have to enlarge the holes in the engine brackets if the new studs are larger than the original ones. Use lockwashers under the heads of the bolts, and never-seize compound on the threads.

If you attempt to remove the old mounts, and the nut turns but does not come off, it means that the bolts under the pan were not welded to a metal plate to prevent them from turning. In this case, drill a 2" hole in the sidewall of the pan, alongside each mount, with the top about 1" down from the top of the pan. This will give access to the bolt heads underneath. The new mounts can be centered on the old locations, new holes drilled, and locknuts with large backup washers installed under the pan.

Section F-02 Price List - Engine Mounts

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Engine Mounts - DF-100 for up to 50 HP engine, set of 4 $  175.00 pkg
Engine Mounts - for 60 to 85 HP engine, set of 4 (contact us) email bud@westsail.com

Section F-03
ENGINE CHOICES FOR RE-POWERING A WESTSAIL 32

If you are considering re-powering, I believe comparing performance of various engine choices should be based on the cubic inch displacement of the cylinders, rather than rated horsepower, as the displacement translates itself into power available at the shaft. Horsepower ratings cannot be accurately compared, as the manufacturers use different RPM's to calculate horsepower, and the higher the RPM, the more the rated horsepower. The Volvo MD 2B (later called the MD 11C) has 66 cubic inches of displacement, rated at 25 HP, and has proven to not have enough reserve power to adequately move the Westsail 32 in anything other than smooth water. The Volvo MD 3B (later called the MD 17C) was rated at 35 HP, with 99 cubic inches of displacement. The Perkins 4-108 was rated at 50 HP, and has 108 cubic inches of displacement. Either of these engines will push the boat at 6 to 7 knots in smooth water, and maintain 5 to 6 knots against rough water, with ample reserve power. If you are comparing engines and prices for a replacement, be sure the engine you choose for the Westsail 32 has about 90 cubic inches of displacement, as any less will not really give satisfactory motoring performance.

There is no question that there a number of good engines on the market, but in my opinion, the Perkins 4-108 was probably the best one for the Westsail 32. This is based on 20 years experience with the engine, and results of use in the Westsail since 1972. Some have had to be overhauled, worn out from extreme use, or failure from a broken oil line, but are usually not replaced with another make of engine.

Perkins, in their "corporate wisdom", discontinued the manufacturing of the 4-108 model in 1988, in favor of some new models. There are probably no "new" 4-108's left, but rebuilt ones are available. Parts are available worldwide, as well as mechanics that know how to service them. As of 1999, Perkins no longer imports any engines suitable for the Westsail 32.

The engines that I am now recommending for the Westsail 32 are the Beta Marine 35, and the Beta Marine 38. Both of these engines use a four cylinder cast iron block, and use a basic engine manufactured by Kubota as an industrial engine. The Beta 35 has 91.4 cu. in displacement and the Beta 38 also has 91.4 cu. in. displacement. The main difference in these engines is the RPM that the engines are adjusted for. The majority of the replacements I have done are with the Beta 38, previously known as the Beta 1505.

To properly compare the Yanmar engines, the 3HM35 has 78 cubic inch displacement, and the Yanmar 4JHE has 100 cubic inch displacement.

I would not recommend using a turbo charged version of any engine to increase the horsepower rating, as I do not believe that you will not get the longevity of use out of the engine.

Section F-03 Price List - Engine Choices for Westsail 32

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Engine - Beta 35 - 4 cyl, 91 cu.in, 35 HP @ 2800 RPM, TMC 60 transmission, B Panel, 70 amp alternator with flat belt, high rise exhaust elbow, four engine mounts, standard engine brackets $  11,470.00 pkg
Engine - Beta 38 - 4 cyl, 91 cu.in, 38 HP @ 3600 RPM, TMC 60 transmission, B Panel, 70 amp alternator with flat belt, high rise exhaust elbow, four engine mounts, standard engine brackets 11,850.00 pkg

Section F-04
ENGINE SPEEDS, VIBRATION, AND BOAT SPEED

ENGINE SPEEDS AND BREAK-IN

There is usually additional vibration at low RPM's because the engine has certain harmonic speeds where it builds up a vibration. Any time you have unusual vibration, you should be able to change the RPM by 25 to 50 revs and smooth out the vibrations. A fuel sheen on the water at the exhaust outlet is unburnt diesel going through the engine, and should clear up when the engine is warmed up. After 50 hours or so of running of a new engine, the engine should be serviced, valves adjusted, and the head torqued down by a competent mechanic. I believe it describes that in the Owners Manual.

For break-in of the engine, you should run it for short periods of time at the maximum it will go, after warming it up well. Advance the throttle slowly until the RPM will not go any higher, then back off on the throttle until the RPM just starts to drop. That will be the maximum, without pushing excess fuel thru the engine. This maximum varies, depending on the prop size, and the quality of fuel, but should be about 2500 RPM for a Perkins 4-108. I would recommend running the Perkins 4-108 at about 1800 to 2000 RPM for normal cruising, and about 2200 to 2300 RPM if you are trying to get someplace in a hurry.

ENGINE CONTROL

If you cannot get the controls working properly, I would recommend replacing them with a Vetus single lever control. I have been using it for some time, and it is the least expensive one on the market, and a good unit. Your cost on it is $235.00. It will fit your existing cables, and only the hole thru the cockpit wall will have to be enlarged slightly.

BOAT SPEED UNDER POWER

On the Westsail 32, provided your transmission has a 2 to 1 reduction, which most do for this sailboat installation, you should swing a 16" three blade prop to get the prop out into the stream of water for good push. Make sure the prop is located at least 3" behind the hull opening so that it can get water flow to it. The further back the better, provided it does not interfere with the rudder, and can be removed.

With a Perkins 4-108 or equivalent engine of about 100 cubic inch displacement, you should get about 5 knots in still water at 1800 RPM, about 6 knots at 2200 RPM, and 6.5 to 7 knots at maximum of about 2500 to 2600 RPM.

Performance of W32 with new Perkins 4-108 with Borg Warner 1000 transmission, 16 x 13 RH 3 blade prop, full tanks, towing dingy was tested by one owner, and here are the results.

1750 RPM - 5 knots, 2000 RPM - 5.5 knots, 2200 RPM - 6 knots, 2300 RPM - 6.2 knots 2800 RPM - 6.4 knots max

The 16" 3 blade Maxi Prop with a Perkins 4-108 with Borg Warner 1000 transmission should be set to 18 EH, which is about equivalent to 10 pitch. The boat will get over 8 knots at max RPM.

Section F-05
PROPELLER CHOICES

For the 2 cylinder Volvo, I would recommend a three-blade 16" diameter by 11" pitch, left hand rotation prop. It will give much better performance than the two bladed, as there are always at least two blades in the water stream, and the reverse performance is greatly improved. The 3 cylinder Volvo should have a 16x13 or 17x12 left hand 3-blade prop. The Perkins 4-108 should have a 16x13 or 17x12 right hand rotation 3-blade prop. The Beta 38 uses a 2.8 to 1 transmission reduction, and we use a 16" x 14" right hand prop.

For a two-blade prop, use the same diameter, and increase the pitch by one inch. A 17" diameter is about as large as will fit in the rudder opening without tip cavitation problems. Make sure the prop is located at least 3" behind the hull opening so that it can get water flow to it. The further back the better, provided it does not interfere with the rudder, and can be removed.

With the correct prop, the Beta, Perkins or three cylinder Volvo should give about 5 knots in still water at 1600 RPM, about 6 knots at 1900 RPM, and 6.5 to 7 knots at about 2200 to 2400 RPM.

The feathering design prop, made by Max-Prop and J Prop, is very efficient in both powering and reducing drag while sailing. The 16" 3 blade Max-Prop with a Perkins 4-108 with Borg Warner 2 to 1 reduction transmission should be set to 18 EH, which is about equivalent to 10 pitch. The boat will get over 8 knots at maximum RPM. The J Prop should be set at 9 RH for equivalent performance.

Both are excellent props, however I feel the J Prop has some distinct advantages over the Max-Prop. The J Prop can be attached directly onto the shaft, similar to a fixed prop, and can be externally adjusted to change the pitch, even underwater. With a Max-Prop, the prop hub has to be installed on the shaft, then the three blades fitted, the correct numbers lined up to achieve the required pitch, then the two halves of the shell attached, being careful to not change any of the numbers. This job can only be done hauled out, and it usually requires two people to handle the three blades at the same time. Both props require shortening the shaft so that the front of the hub is very close to the shaft log bearing.

For the Westsail 42 and 43, the propeller choices are governed by the engine and transmission that was used in the boat.

Section F-05 Price List - Propeller Choices

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Propeller - 16" Diameter, 3-Blade Conventional $  545.00 each
Propeller - 17" Diameter, 3-Blade Conventional - (contact us)
Propeller - 16" Diameter, 3-Blade Maxprop - (contact us)
Propeller - 16" Diameter, 3-Blade J Prop - (contact us)
Propeller - 20" Diameter, 3-Blade Maxprop - (contact us)
1' diameter x 33" Aquamet 17 shaft - with keys and nuts for W28 or W32 290.00 pkg

Section F-06
REPLACING SHAFT BEARING

If you find that there is more than 1/16" of play in the shaft bearing, it is probably time to replace the bearing. On most of the boats, the bearing is in a bronze shaft log housing that is bolted to the back end of the hull with two bolts. Some of the boats had a fiberglass tube as the housing for the bearing.

The bearing can sometimes be removed without removing the bronze housing from the hull. The bearing itself has a grooved rubber liner that the shaft rides in, and has a thin bronze shell that is bonded to the rubber. On most boats, the bearing itself is set flush with the outside flange on the housing, so it is not possible to easily grip the bearing to remove it. It usually needs to be cut, or if a special tool is available at a boatyard, it can be pulled out of the housing.

It is first necessary to remove the prop from the shaft using a suitable prop puller. Next, the coupling must be removed. Remove the four bolts holding the transmission coupling to the shaft coupling, remove the set screws, then if a small puller is available, use it to remove the coupling. If not, put a plug that is slightly smaller in diameter than the shaft between the two couplings, then use four long 3/8" bolts and nuts to force the coupling off of the shaft. Remove the key, then pull the shaft out. Inspect the area where the bearing and the stuffing box packing were riding on the shaft. If there is a great deal of wear, it may be necessary to replace the shaft.

Loosen the hose clamps on the stuffing box and shaft log, and remove the stuffing box from the log. Clean up the stuffing box, free up and grease the threads on the packing nut, and install at least three rings of new teflon based packing. The stuffing boxes usually take 3/16" packing.

Loosen the set screws on the housing that go into the bearing. If the yard has a tool to remove the bearing, use it. Otherwise, cut through the shell of the bearing with a Sawzall, or a hacksaw blade on a small end holder. Clean up the inside of the hole, preferably with a hone, and insert the new bearing. File the shell of the bearing as necessary so that the bearing will fit snugly into the log housing, without excessive force. Let the bearing stick out of the housing about 1/2" for ease of removal the next time. Tighten down the set screws.

Put a little grease on the rubber in the bearing, and slide the shaft in place. Put the stuffing box with its hose and new clamps on the log. Use some never seize compound on the shaft, and attach the coupling with its key, then attach the shaft coupling to the transmission coupling. Check the alignment with a feeler gauge, and if more than .005" out of alignment, then realign the engine. If it is not possible to move the engine on its mounts, and the alignment is way off, then it will be necessary to remove and reset the shaft log. See the procedure F- 7 "Installation of the Shaft Log After Replacing an Engine" for the method of accomplishing this task.

Tighten the packing nut down just finger tight, and install the prop with its key. After the boat is back in the water, and the engine test run, tighten the packing nut again to stop any drips.

Section F-06 Price List - Shaft Bearing

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Cutless Bearing - 1" ID x 1-1/2" OD x 4" long $  50.00 each

Section F-07
INSTALLATION OF THE SHAFT LOG AFTER REPLACING AN ENGINE

Loosen the hose clamps on the stuffing box and shaft log, and pull the hose off of the shaft log. Loosen nuts holding log to hull, and remove shaft log from hull. It may take rotating it with a pipe wrench to loosen it up. Clean off all old caulking. Clean up the stuffing box, free up and grease the threads on the packing nut, and install three rings of new teflon based packing. Clean out hole in stern of boat so that the shaft log easily slides into the hole, with about 1/16" clearance. Clean off any old caulking, and smooth up the face where the shaft log fits the hull.

Remove the bearing from the shaft log. Loosen the set screws if they are installed, and cut through the shell of the bearing with a hacksaw blade on a small holder, or use a Sawzall. If a press is available, then press out the bearing. Clean up the inside of the hole, and insert a new bearing. File the shell of the bearing as necessary so that the bearing will fit snugly into the log, without excessive force. Let the bearing stick out of the aft end of the log about 1/2" for ease of removal next time, and tighten down set screws.

Put the stuffing box with its hose on the shaft. Attach the coupling and shaft to transmission, and tighten the bolts and nuts. Realign engine so shaft comes out middle of hole in stern, put a little grease on the bearing, and slide the log into the hole. Make sure it slides in easily, and does not rub the sides of the hole. Snug down all of the mount bolts, and the nuts on the mounts. Slide the log into the hole again to make sure it still fits the hole easily, and the shaft rotates freely, and the log does not bind on the sides of the hole in the stern. When satisfied with the alignment, recheck tightness of all engine mounting bolts.

Check the face between the log and the hull, and grind off the hull as necessary to make the hull nearly match the angle of the log. With the log in place, re-drill the 3/8" holes that hold the log to the hull so that the bolts easily slip through.

Mix up a small quantity of epoxy putty (such as Marine-Tex), and put it on the mounting face of the hull and the log. Slip the shaft log back into place. Put a wrap of masking tape on the threads of the bolts so the putty does not stick to the threads, put a washer on each bolt, and some caulking under the washers. Slip them thru the holes from the inside. Remove the masking tape and wipe off any putty from the threads and install a washer with caulking under it on the outside, and snug a single nut down finger tight. Tighten just enough to squeeze some putty out of the mounting face. Check to see that the shaft still rotates easily, and that the tightening of the nuts did not move the log out of good alignment. Remove any excess putty from around the face of the log, then let the putty harden. After the epoxy putty has hardened, install the second locking nuts on the shaft log bolts, and caulk over the outer parts of the shaft log with polyurethane or polysulphide caulking.

Section F-07 Price List - Shaft Log

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Shaft Log - bronze housing for 1" shaft, 2" hose $  195.00 each
Stuffing Box - with hose and clamps - for 1" shaft, 2" hose, with clamps 99.00 each
Cutless Bearing - 1" ID x 1-1/2" OD x 4" long 50.00 each
Shaft Packing - 3/16" square Teflon impregnated 6.50 each
Epoxy Putty PC-11 - 2 oz. black 7.50 each

Section F-08
EXHAUST SYSTEMS

I have had a lot of inquiries regarding the proper exhaust system for a sailboat engine, and I have found that welded steel or stainless steel mufflers usually last about 7 to 10 years, then they crack along the welds. For the past 25 years I have been using the fiberglass waterlift mufflers in conjunction with a steel pipe or cast iron water cooled exhaust elbow on the manifold. My experience has been that system will last almost indefinitely. If a welded steel water cooled elbow is used, they may develop leaks at the welds after 7 to 10 years, but are easy to unbolt and replace.

A proper installation should have the water cooled elbow pointing down at about a 30 degree angle from the manifold, and the water injected on the downward slope. There should be about a 2" to 4" drop from the point the water is injected to the inlet of the muffler. This portion of the line can be a reasonable length of good quality rubber hose as the water is mixed with the exhaust gas here and cooled. The purpose of the design of the muffler is then to lift the exhaust gas and water up to the hull outlet, and to quiet the exhaust noises. The hose coming out of the muffler should rise to deck level, then drop down to the exhaust outlet. This will prevent back-flooding of water into the system.

If in some installations there is not enough room to install the muffler with the proper drop below the water inlet, it is possible to install pipe elbows and a nipple onto the manifold pointing up and then back before making the loop that then drops down. The water must be injected on the downward side of the loop, towards the muffler. I have used this method successfully on some engines by using two street ells on the manifold, one pointing up and the other pointing aft, before connecting the water cooled elbow.

If the elbow portion of the muffler on the original Volvo installation is still in good condition, cut it off at the point it enters the muffler, attach a hose to it, and run to the inlet of the new muffler.

For the W-32 the fiberglass muffler can be mounted alongside the shaft, or under the fiberglass box shelf aft of the engine. The most popular model is the horizontal one with the outlet hose going thru the lazarette bulkhead, with a high loop in the lazarette. For the W-42 a fiberglass muffler can be mounted in the well just ahead of the engine, with elbows to direct the hose and eliminate sharp bends. For the W-43 the fiberglass muffler can be mounted under the aft berth, with fiberglass elbows to handle the bends.

Mufflers are available in various sizes of cylinder and length, mounted either horizontal or vertical, with inlets on the side or top. There are a variety of sizes available of inlet and outlet pipes, and it is wise to get one that fits your present hoses, as it saves the cost of a new outlet hose. For a 25 to 40 HP engine, the muffler should be about 6" dia. x 10" long; for a 50 HP engine the muffler should be about 8" dia. x 13" long; for a 60 to 70 HP engine it should be about 10" dia. x 10" long; and for the 85 HP Perkins or similar, either 12" dia. x 12" long, or 10" dia. x 17" long.

The small hose that carries the cooling water out of the manifold and into the elbow should rise up in a loop to the deck level. At the top of this loop a tee should be installed with a reducer on it to a 1/4" dia. hose that connects to the cockpit drain. This serves to break any siphon on the inlet seawater hose when the engine is shut down, and bleeds a little of the cooling water off so it can be observed flowing down the cockpit drain. If the water cooling system fails, exhaust gases or steam will come out of the cockpit drain. It is a good indicator to shut down and find the problem.

To mount the muffler, it should be spotted in place so the hose from the elbow into it is a smooth drop, and the outlet hose is not kinked. The muffler can be stuck to the hull side with a lump of epoxy putty, or strapped with stainless clamps, nylon webbing, aluminum straps, etc. If the inlet or outlet of the muffler is slightly smaller than the exhaust hose, a few wraps of duct tape applied around the pipe will build it up, or a short piece of hose can be used as a spacer bushing. Just slip both hoses on to the muffler pipe, and clamp down. Use double clamps on all hoses.

The muffler should be mounted close enough to the centerline, or low enough, so that when the boat is heeled there is still a drop from the elbow into the muffler. If the lower half of the muffler gets above the top of the exhaust elbow, then water can run back into the engine when not running.

A water cooled elbow is available made up in steel for the Volvo or as a replacement for the Perkins 4-107 or 4-108 engines. A stainless steel high rise exhaust elbow is also available for the Beta engine, and one also for a Perkins engine.


Section F-08 Price List - Exhaust Systems

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Exhaust Muffler - 6" dia. x 10" horizontal fiberglass muffler for Volvo or Beta engines $  195.00 each
Exhaust Muffler - 8" dia. x 13" horizontal fiberglass muffler for Perkins 4-108 or larger engines (contact us) email bud@westsail.com
Exhaust Muffler - 10" dia. x 17" horizontal fiberglass muffler (for W-42 & W-43) (contact us) email bud@westsail.com
Exhaust Elbow - 2-7/8" dia. fiberglass elbow for W-42 & W-43 (contact us) email bud@westsail.com
Exhaust Bracket - Stainless mounting bracket clamp for 6" horizontal fiberglass muffler 20.00 pkg
Exhaust Elbow - Steel high rise water cooled elbow, 1-1/4" inlet pipe for Volvo or 1-1/2" inlet pipe for Perkins 4-108 - uses 1-7/8" hose outlet 150.00 each
Exhaust Elbow - Stainless steel high rise exhaust elbow for Beta engine when ordered with engine 265.00 each
Anti-Siphon Tee - plastic fittings - 1/4" hose, fittings, (specify engine manifold outlet pipe and elbow inlet size) 15.00 pkg
Hose Clamps - Stainless steel hose clamps (specify hose OD size) 1.15 each
Exhaust Hose - 1-5/8" ID exhaust hose (fits 1-1/4" ID pipe) (contact us) email bud@westsail.com
Exhaust Hose - 1-7/8" ID exhaust hose (fits 1-1/2" ID pipe) 7.00 foot
Exhaust Hose - 2" ID exhaust hose (fits 2" OD exhaust elbow) 8.00 foot
NOTE: - Other sizes and parts available. (Contact Us)

Section F-09
BETA 25 (BD-902) ENGINE FOR THE WESTSAIL 28

If you were considering repowering your Westsail 28, this particular engine would be well suited for your boat. Some of the boats originally had a Volvo MD7 engine, of about 15 HP, and this was underpowered for the boat. Many had the Volvo MD11C, of about 25 HP, and this was fine. This Beta engine should give the same performance as the Volvo MD11C. The engine has three cylinders, 55 cu. in. displacement, rated 25 HP at 3600 RPM, and is smaller than the 2 cylinder Volvo, and lighter weight at about 300 lbs.

It fits very nicely, with very few modifications of the engine beds. The engine with transmission is only 30" long, and 18-1/2" wide. The engine comes standard with fresh water cooling and a TMC 40 transmission with a 2.6 to 1 reduction, which is appropriate for the boat. While it is preferable to exchange the engine with the boat hauled out, it is possible to have the whole job done in the water. The same shaft, log, stuffing box and engine controls can be used. If you check your shaft length, and it is too short for this installation, then a new shaft will be required. This engine/transmission combination is much shorter in length than the Volvo MD11C.

A high-rise water-cooled exhaust elbow comes with the engine, and a fiberglass water lift muffler should be used. The existing exhaust hose and outlet can be used, but an additional hose is needed to connect the elbow to the muffler. The shift and throttle brackets come with the engine, and the existing cables will hook up to them. The instrument panel is prewired, and it is only necessary to cut the hole in the cockpit, and plug in the panel. New 3/4" hose may be necessary to supply raw water to the engine.

The engine comes with low oil and high water temperature alarms and lights. There is a final stage fuel filter installed, and a spin-on oil filter. The alternator is a 40 amp marine type. The mounts, prop shaft coupling, and control cable brackets are included. Various instrument panels are available, but they all come prewired, with key switch, push button start and stop switches, electric tachometer, oil pressure and water temperature gauges, lights and alarms.

A full set of procedures is available for the installation of this engine in a Westsail 28.

BETA 25 (BD-902) ENGINE IN WESTSAIL 28


Section F-09 Price List - Beta 25 (BD-902) Engine for Westsail 28

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Engine - Beta 25 (BD-902) Engine - complete with Type B engine panel, TMC 40 transmission with 2.6 to 1 reduction, fresh water cooling system, high rise exhaust elbow, engine mounts, shaft coupling and flexible coupling, connection kits, 40 amp alternator, oil change pump, test run and calibrated $  9,576.00 pkg
Installation Parts - Inquire for complete list of installation parts needed and drawings.

Section F-10
BETA 38 (BV-1505) ENGINE FOR WESTSAIL 32

The engine that has proven very successful in the Westsail 32 is the Perkins 4-108, however this engine is no longer available. The engines of choice that I am now recommending is the Beta 38 (BV-1505). The 38 is rated as about the same power curve as the Perkins, or 38 HP at 3600 RPM. The engines are shorter in overall length and lighter in weight than the 108. The engine comes with fresh water cooling and I use a TMC 60 with 2.83 to 1 or a PRM 120 with 2.94 to 1 reduction transmissions on the 38. The basic engine is a Kubota industrial engine, with cast iron block, and the marine conversion done by Beta Marine in England. Parts and service are available worldwide.

It is preferable to exchange the engine with the boat hauled out, however it is possible to have the whole job done in the water. Sometimes the same shaft can be used, and the log, stuffing box and engine controls are able to be used. The propeller must be changed, as it uses a right hand prop rather then the left hand used on a Volvo engine. To install the Beta engine in a Westsail 32 with the full engine room liner, you need to order the engine with the special rear mounting brackets offered. A set of four 1/2" thick aluminum plates are bolted to the four flats. The engine is then dropped onto these plates, and moved and shimmed until the shaft lines up. The mounts are then fastened by tapping into the aluminum plates, and bolting with 3/8" hex bolts. If your boat has one of the original small Volvo engine pans in it rather than the engine room liner, then bolt down two long 1/2" mounting plates to the engine pan, and tap these plates to mount the engine. Spacer plates are used to achieve correct shaft alignment.

The fuel tanks should be carefully inspected at this time, and if they need replacing it should be done before the new engine is installed. A high rise water cooled exhaust elbow comes with the engine, and a fiberglass water lift muffler should be used. The existing exhaust hose and outlet can be used, but an additional hose is needed to connect the elbow to the muffler. The shift and throttle brackets come with the engine, and the existing cables will hook up to them. The instrument panel is prewired, and it is only necessary to enlarge the hole in the cockpit, and plug in the panel. New 3/4" hose must be installed to supply raw water cooling to the engine, and it may be necessary to increase the size of the seawater strainer fittings. Longer battery cables may also be necessary.

The engine comes with low oil and high water temperature alarms and lights. There is a final stage fuel filter installed, and a spin-on oil filter. The mounts and control cable brackets are included, and a high rise exhaust elbow. The instrument panel is prewired, with key switch, push button start, electric tachometer, oil pressure and water temperature lights and alarms.

The entire removal and installation should not take more than three days with two people, plus a haulout and crane to change engines. The installation of any auxiliary equipment and cleanup or painting of the engine room may add some time to the total job.

(See pricing section for current pricing information.)

BETA 38 (BV 1505) ENGINE DRAWING


BETA 38 (BV 1505) ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS


AVAILABLE OPTIONS

Section F-10 Price List - Beta 38 Engine for Westsail 32

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Engine - Beta Model 38 - complete with Type B engine panel, TMC 60 2.83 to 1 marine transmission, flexible coupling, engine mounts, high rise exhaust elbow, control connection kits, 65 amp alternator, test run and calibrated $  11,850.00 pkg
Engine - Beta Model 38 - as above with Type C panel 12,000.00 pkg
Special Rear Brackets - needed for W32 full engine room liner installation 195.00 pkg
NOTE: - Inquire regarding the balance of installation parts needed and engine optional equipment. (Contact Us)

Section F-11
BETA 38 (BV1505) SMALL PAN INSTALLATION PROCEDURE IN WESTSAIL 32

  1. Remove cockpit floor or the entire cockpit well on the older boats. Remove the old engine and mounts, engine electrical panel and all of the old engine wiring. Leave the shift lever and cables and the last section of exhaust hose, if they are still in serviceable condition.
  2. The job is easiest done if the boat is hauled out. Remove prop and key and pull out shaft. Remove stuffing box and hose from the shaft log. Remove two bolts holding shaft log to hull and pull off log. Clean off old caulking. Barrel sand out the hole in the stern so that the log fits in easily with some clearance all around. Replace shaft bearing in shaft log housing. Install new packing in stuffing box.
  3. For small fiberglass pan type mount proceed as follows:
    • Punch out the old bolts holding the engine mounts. Make up 1/2" thick by 28" long aluminum plates to fit each side of the engine bed, shaped per the drawing. These plates will bolt down to the pan with fender washers and locknuts underneath.
    • Mark the locations of the four engine mounts on the fiberglass pan. Grind rear mount flat area as necessary to locate the plates as shown on the diagram. Cut thru the upper sides of the aft end of the pan mounting flange if necessary so that these plates can slide out toward the hull to get the proper spacing aft for the mounts. Set the long plates in the correct location, and drill the mounting holes through the fiberglass pan. Drill 1- 5/8" holes on sides of pan to gain access to the underside of the bolts that will hold the long plates down in place.
    • Bolt down the long plates with 3/8" x 2-1/2" hex bolts, with 1-1/2" fender washers and locknuts on the underside. Some pans will require 2" bolts instead.
  4. The new shaft length should be 34". The engine coupling location will be about 25-3/4" from the inside of the hull. The front pulley on the engine will be about 3-1/2" aft of the engine room bulkhead. The rest of the dimensions are shown on the attached drawing. The front and rear mounts will be 16" apart, and 17-1/4" apart. The engine coupling would be 9" aft of the rear mount holes.
  5. If necessary, remove the clamping bracket under the starboard forward mount holding the fuel and oil line hoses. Adjust the lower nuts on the flex mounts so that they are 1" above the top of the mount. Put the mounts on the engine, and put standard hex nuts on just finger tight to hold the mounts in place. Set engine on the bed, and adjust fore and aft location and center the engine. Fit the coupling and shaft to the transmission temporarily with two bolts and nuts. Adjust mounts so that the shaft comes out the center of the large hole in the stern where you have removed the log. When the shaft is in the center of the hole, verify that the mount studs are straight up and not bent over, and mark the location of the tapped holes on the aluminum plates to bolt the mounts down. You will also need to mark the edges of the fiberglass pan to make cuts necessary to clear the bell housing on the engine and the shift arm. Remove shaft coupling and shaft, then lift the engine up to drill 5/16" pilot holes and tap the aluminum with a 3/8"-16 tap. Cut notches to clear bell housing and shift lever as needed.
  6. With the engine up in the air, adjust the transmission shift cable and the throttle cables so they will fit in the proper locations to operate correctly, but do not connect them yet. With the shift lever pointing aft, pulling it up gives right hand rotation with the TMC or PRM transmission. The transmission is run with right hand rotation being forward. The engine shift control can be reversed if necessary. Also loosen the nut on the starter solenoid where the positive battery cable attaches. These operations are much more easily done before the engine is placed back down on the mounts.
  7. Remove the four mounts from the engine and check the location of the lower nuts on the engine mounts. If they are more than 1" above the mount, then plan on using one or more of the 1/2" spacer plates under the mounts, and adjust the lower nuts accordingly to accommodate these spacer plates. The engine mounting brackets should wind up on the lower half of the threaded studs. Put all of the mounts, spacer plates and holdown bolts (with never seize compound on them) onto pan loosely, with flat washers and lock washers, then set engine back down in place on the mounts. Check to see the engine is not rubbing anywhere on the pan. Install new packing in the stuffing box, and put the stuffing box on the shaft, and attach the stainless key and the coupling and shaft to transmission, and hold with two bolts. Realign engine so shaft comes out middle of the hole in stern, and then snug down all of the bolts and nuts on the mounts. Install locknuts or lockwashers on the upper sides of the four mounts, and snug them down.
  8. Grind clean the aft face of the hull where the shaft log mounts. Grease shaft log bearing, and put it back in place. Make sure the shaft rotates freely, and the log does not bind on the sides of the hole in the stern. When the mount bolts were tightened down, sometimes the engine moves slightly. When satisfied with the alignment, recheck tightness of all engine mounting bolts. Separate the shaft couplings, slide the shaft back, and install the Drivesaver that came with the engine. Mix up a quantity of epoxy putty (such as Marine-Tex), put the shaft log back part way in place, and put the bronze bolts thru the holes from the inside with caulking under the washers. Put the epoxy putty on the mounting face between the hull and the shaft log. Slide the shaft log back into place, put on washers with caulking on them, and snug the nuts down just enough to squeeze some putty out of the mounting face. Remove any excess putty and let the putty harden. After the putty is hard, install the second locking nuts on the shaft log bolts. Caulk the joint on the inner part of the shaft log, then slide the stuffing box with hose and clamps onto shaft log and tighten the clamps. Make sure the bolts on the coupling and Drivesaver are tight, and there is a lockwire on shaft setscrews. The basic engine installation is now completed.
  9. Cut the hole for the instrument panel. Fasten panel with screws or bolts and nuts. Plug in the pre-wired harness and connect the positive battery cable from the common on the disconnect switch to the post on the starter solenoid, and negative cable from a battery to a ground bolt on the engine. If you have a second battery, connect a negative cable between them.
  10. Hook up the sea water cooling, using a minimum 3/4" seacock with 3/4" ID hose. The sea water hose goes to the inlet on the salt water pump at the forward end of the engine. You may have to turn the elbow on the water pump inlet to face to starboard or use a barb facing down so the hose will not be kinked against the bulkhead. A sea water strainer should be installed.
  11. Cut the hose that goes from the manifold into the exhaust elbow and insert 7/8" to 3/4" hose adapters. Use 3/4" hose up thru an anti-siphon loop, then back down to the fitting on the exhaust elbow. The anti-siphon loop can be a purchased one, or can be made from a 3/4" tee, a 3/4" street elbow, (2) 3/4" pipe to barb hose adapters, 3/4" x 1/2" reducer bushing, and a 1/2" MPT x 1/4" barb. Drill and tap into a cockpit drain with a 1/8" pipe tap, and install a 1/8" x 1/4" barb fitting. Connect a 1/4" hose from the drain barb to the anti-siphon loop barb, with a loop in the hose up to the deck level.
  12. Install the transmission shift cable and the throttle cable. With the shift lever pointing aft, pulling it up gives right hand rotation with the PRM transmission. The transmission is run with right hand rotation being forward, and a right hand prop. The engine shift control may have to be reversed if necessary.
  13. The fiberglass waterlift muffler is mounted aft of the engine exhaust manifold on the port side. Cut a 2-3/4" hole to clear the hose at the bottom of the lazarette bulkhead and in the lazarette floor to bring the hose out the aft end of the muffler. Put some duct tape on the inlet tube of the muffler to build the size up from 1-7/8" to 2". Connect an approximately 12" length of 2" ID hose from the exhaust elbow to the muffler inlet. Set the horizontal round fiberglass muffler in place, and check to see there is a slight drop from the end of the exhaust elbow to the muffler inlet. Clamp with double hose clamps. On the muffler outlet, loop the 1-7/8" ID hose up high in the lazarette, then back down to the thruhull outlet. If it is any easier, use 1-1/2" fiberglass or pipe elbows and nipples to make the bends and loop, or you can use a 1-1/2" shutoff valve at the top of the loop. Fasten the muffler in place with straps or epoxy putty against the fiberglass.
  14. Connect the 5/16" fuel supply and return hoses. The engine comes with 5/6" hose barbs, and it is only necessary to determine which is the supply and which is the return, and push on the new fuel line hoses. If you do not have return fittings on the tanks, you can put a tee on the tank vent fitting for a return. If you return into a vent tee, make sure the return hose shoots into the tank, and not out the vent. If you have two tanks, you will need to install selector valves to supply and return to the same tank while running.
  15. This should complete the installation. Add coolant, engine oil, and transmission oil, make sure there is fuel in the filter, and start the engine. It will self-bleed all of the air bubbles in the system. After a few hours of operation, re-tighten all mounting bolts and nuts.

ENGINE INSTALLATION TOOLS AND MATERIALS

TOOLS

Grinder, carborundum cutting disk, saber saw with fiberglass cutting blades, hammer, puller for prop, center punch, drill bits of 3/16", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8", and 13/32", 1-1/2" hole saw, 2-3/4" hole saw, drill motor with 1/2" chuck, 1-1/2" drum sander with coarse paper, rat-tail rasp, flat file, vise grips, tap holders, 3/8"-16 tap, 1/8" pipe tap, 15/16" short open end and box wrench, 13 mm, 15 mm, 9/16" and 11/16" box and end wrenches, socket set, metric and US hex wrenches, packing box wrench, chain hoist or cumalong, shop vacuum, pipe wrench.

MATERIALS

(2) 1/2" aluminum long mounting plates, (up to 6) 1/2" aluminum spacer plates, siphon break consisting of a 3/4" PVC tee, 3/4" PVC street ell, (2) 3/4" MPT x 3/4" barb PVC hose adapters, 3/4" x 1/2" PVC reducer bushing, 1/2" MPT x 1/4" PVC barb, 1/8" MPT x 1/4" brass barb, (2) 7/8" x 3/4" PVC hose menders, (3) 3/4" MPT x 3/4" barb brass hose adapters, (25') 5/16" fuel hose, (3') 1/4" water hose, (7') 3/4" water hose, (7') 7/8" water hose, (12") 2" wire braid exhaust hose, (2) 1/4" #4 mini hose clamps, (14) 5/16" #5 mini hose clamps, (8) 7/8" #12 hose clamps, (4) 2" #36 hose clamps, (2) 1-7/8" #32 hose clamps, Permatex, never seize compound, masking tape, duct tape, epoxy putty, polyurethane caulking.

Fasteners: (8) 3/8" x 2-1/2" hex bolts, (8) 3/8" x 1-1/4" hex bolts, (8) 3/8" locknuts, (16) 3/8" flat washers, (8) 3/8" lock washers, (8) 3/8" x 1-1/2" fender washers, (4) lockwashers for mounts; for shaft log: (2) 3/8" x 2-1/2" bronze bolts, (4) 3/8" bronze hex nuts, (4) 3/8" bronze flat washers.

Also Needed: 16" dia., 3 blade right hand prop, 34" long shaft with coupling, keys and nuts fitted, new bearing (1"x 1-1/2"x 4"), 3/16" stuffing box packing, stainless steel lock wire, 6" dia. X 10" long fiberglass muffler.

Needed for Two Tank Fuel System: (2) fuel selector valves with 5/16" barbs, (2) 1/4" MPT x 5/16" barb for in and out of filter, (4) 3/8" MPT x 5/16" barb for in and out of two tanks, 3/8" brass tees, nipples, and street ells for return lines..

Possibly Needed: Positive and Negative 1/0 battery cable, Morse 33C x 6' & 8' shift and throttle cables, new single lever control, (12') 1-7/8" exhaust hose, (4) 1-7/8" #32 hose clamps, (6) 1/4" x 1/2" hex bolts for engine room seacocks.

BETA 38 (1505) SMALL PAN JUNE 2012


Section F-12
BETA 38 (BV1505) FULL LINER INSTALLATION PROCEDURE IN WESTSAIL 32

  1. Remove cockpit floor. Remove the old engine and mounts, engine electrical panel and all of the old engine wiring. Leave the shift lever and cables and the last section of 1-7/8' ID exhaust hose, if they are still in serviceable condition.
  2. The job is easiest done if the boat is hauled out. Remove prop and key and pull out shaft. Remove stuffing box and hose from the shaft log. Remove two bolts holding shaft log to hull and pull off log. Barrel sand out the hole in the stern so that the log fits in easily with some clearance all around. Replace shaft bearing in shaft log housing. Install new packing in stuffing box.

    The installation can be done with the vessel in the water if the engine that was removed was a two cylinder Volvo, as the shaft coupling location should be correct. You will need to remove the old Volvo shaft coupling, and install the new one on the existing shaft. This installation can be accomplished by using additional riser blocks under the mounts to raise the engine up enough so that the transmission coupling will line up with the existing shaft coupling location. It will require that the front mounts be raised 3" and the rear mounts raised 1-1/2".
  3. You must use the special Beta raised rear mounting brackets for this installation. For full fiberglass engine room liner proceed as follows:

    Punch out the old bolts holding the engine mounts. Make up four 1/2" thick aluminum plates to fit each side of the engine mounting flats, shaped per the drawing. These plates will bolt down to the liner with fender washers and locknuts underneath. Set the plates in the correct location as shown in the drawing, and drill the mounting holes through the fiberglass pan. Cut 1-5/8" dia. holes on sides of pan to gain access to the underside of the bolts that will hold the long plates down in place. Bolt down the plates with 3/8"x3-1/2" hex bolts, with 1-1/2" fender washers and locknuts on the underside.

    If you are installing a feathering prop, see the special instructions for the fore and aft engine location.
  4. The new shaft length should be 32", except for an installation with a feathering prop. The engine coupling location will be about 24-1/2" from the aft inside of the hull. The front pulley on the engine will be about 4" aft of the engine room bulkhead. The rest of the dimensions are shown on the attached drawing. The front mounts will be 16-1/4" apart. The rear mounts will be 19" apart, and 17-1/2" aft of the front mounts. The engine coupling is 9" aft of the rear mount holes, and allow another 1-1/4" for the drivesaver.
  5. Adjust the lower nuts on the aft flex mounts so that they are almost down to the bottom of the mount, and adjust the lower nuts of the forward flex mounts so that they are 2" above the top of the mount. Put the mounts on the engine, and put standard hex nuts on just finger tight to hold the mounts in place. Set engine on the bed, and adjust fore and aft location and center the engine. Fit the coupling and shaft to the transmission temporarily with two bolts and nuts. Adjust mounts so that the shaft comes out the center of the large hole in the stern where you have removed the log. When the shaft is in the center of the hole, verify that the mount studs are straight up and not bent over, and mark the location of the tapped holes on the aluminum plates to bolt the mounts down. You may also need to mark the port aft corner of the fiberglass pan to make a cut necessary to clear the transmission shift lever. Remove shaft coupling and shaft, then lift the engine up to drill 5/16" pilot holes and tap the aluminum with a 3/8"-16 tap. Cut the corner of the pan to clear the shift lever if necessary.
  6. With the engine up in the air, adjust the transmission shift cable and the throttle cables so they will fit in the proper locations to operate correctly, but do not connect them yet. With the shift lever pointing aft, pulling it up gives right hand rotation with the TMC transmission. The engine shift control can be reversed if necessary. Also loosen the nut on the starter solenoid where the positive battery cable attaches. You should also cut a 7" diameter hole on the lower portion of the port fiberglass box aft of the engine to fit the muffler. These operations are much more easily done before the engine is placed back down on the mounts, but can be done later.
  7. Remove the four mounts from the engine and check the location of the lower nuts on the engine mounts. If they are more than 1" above the mount, then plan on using one or more of the 1/2" spacer plates under the mounts, and adjust the lower nuts accordingly to accommodate these spacer plates. The front mounts will probably need 1" to 1-1/2" of spacer plates. The engine mounting brackets should wind up on the lower half of the threaded studs. Put all of the mounts, spacer plates and holdown bolts (with never seize compound on them) onto the pan loosely, with flat washers and lock washers. Set engine back down in place on the mounts. Check to see the engine is not rubbing anywhere on the pan. Install new packing in the stuffing box, and put the stuffing box on the shaft, and attach the stainless key and the coupling and shaft to transmission, and hold with two bolts. Realign engine so shaft comes out middle of the hole in stern, and then snug down all of the bolts and nuts on the mounts. Install locknuts on the upper sides of the four mounts, and snug them down.
  8. Grind clean the aft face of the hull where the shaft log mounts. Grease shaft log bearing, and put it back in place. Make sure the shaft rotates freely, and the log does not bind on the sides of the hole in the stern. When the mount bolts were tightened down, sometimes the engine moves slightly. When satisfied with the alignment, recheck tightness of all engine mounting bolts. Separate the shaft couplings, slide the shaft back, and install the Drivesaver that came with the engine. A special thin 11/16" wrench may be needed. Mix up a quantity of epoxy putty, put the shaft log back part way in place, and put the bronze bolts thru the holes from the inside with caulking under the washers. Put the epoxy putty on the mounting face between the hull and the shaft log. Slide the shaft log back into place, put on washers with caulking on them, and snug the nuts down just enough to squeeze some putty out of the mounting face. Remove any excess putty and let the putty harden. After the putty is hard, install the second locking nuts on the shaft log bolts. Caulk the joint on the inner part of the shaft log, then slide the stuffing box with hose and clamps onto shaft log and tighten the clamps. Make sure the bolts on the coupling and Drivesaver are tight, and there is a lockwire on shaft setscrews. The basic engine installation is now completed.
  9. Cut the hole for the instrument panel. Fasten panel with screws or bolts and nuts. Plug in the pre-wired harness and connect the positive battery cable from the common on the disconnect switch to the post on the starter solenoid, and negative cable from a battery to a ground bolt on the engine. If you have a second battery, connect a negative cable between them.
  10. Hook up the seawater cooling, using a minimum 3/4" seacock with 3/4" ID hose. The seawater hose goes to the inlet on the salt water pump at the forward end of the engine. A seawater strainer should be installed. Make sure the seawater inlet hose does not have any kinks in the hose.
  11. Remove the elbow hose and any tube that goes from the manifold into the exhaust elbow. Use 3/4" or 7/8" hose up thru an anti-siphon loop, then back down to the fitting on the exhaust elbow. The anti-siphon loop can be a purchased one, or can be made from a 3/4" tee, a 3/4" street elbow, (2) 3/4" pipe to barb hose adapters, 3/4" x 1/2" reducer bushing, and a 1/2" MPT x 1/4" barb. You may need to wrap the 3/4" barbs with duct tape to fit snugly into the 7/8" hose. Drill and tap into a cockpit drain with a 1/8" pipe tap, and install a 1/8" x 1/4" barb fitting. Connect a 1/4" hose from the drain barb to the anti-siphon loop barb, with a loop in the hose up to the deck level.
  12. Install the transmission shift cable and the throttle cable. With the shift lever pointing aft, pulling it up gives right hand rotation with the TMC transmission. The transmission is run with right hand rotation being forward, and a right hand prop. The engine shift control may have to be reversed if necessary.
  13. The fiberglass waterlift muffler is mounted aft of the engine exhaust manifold on the port side. Cut a 7" diameter hole in the fiberglass box aft of the engine. Cut a 3" hole to clear the hose through the lazarette bulkhead just under the top of the fiberglass box to bring the hose out the aft end of the muffler. Put some duct tape on the inlet tube of the muffler to build the size up from 1-7/8" to 2". Connect an approximately 12" length of 2" ID hose from the exhaust elbow to the muffler inlet. Set the horizontal round fiberglass muffler as far back into the box as possible, and check to see there is a slight drop from the end of the exhaust elbow to the muffler inlet. The inlet and outlet tubes of the muffler must be on the upper side. Cut the 2" diameter hose to length if necessary. On the muffler outlet, install the 1-7/8" ID hose to connect to the original exhaust outlet hullside fitting. This exhaust outlet hose must go up high in the lazarette, then back down to the thruhull outlet. If it is any easier, use 1-1/2" fiberglass or pipe elbows and nipples to make the bends and loop, or you can use a 1-1/2" shutoff valve at the top of the loop. Use double clamps on the 2" hose between the exhaust elbow and the muffler inlet. The muffler can be wedged in place to prevent rattling, or fastened in place with straps or epoxy putty against the fiberglass.
  14. Connect the 5/16" fuel supply and return hoses. The engine comes with 5/6" hose barbs, and it is only necessary to determine which is the supply and which is the return, and push on the new fuel line hoses. The return hose comes directly from the aft most injector. If you do not have return fittings on the tanks, you can put a tee on the tank vent fitting for a return. If you return into a vent tee, make sure the return hose shoots into the tank, and not out the vent. If you have two tanks, you will need to install selector valves to supply and return to the same tank while running.
  15. This should complete the installation. Add coolant, engine oil, and transmission oil, make sure there is fuel in the filter, and start the engine. It will self-bleed all of the bubbles in the system. After a few hours of operation, re-tighten all mounting bolts and nuts.

ENGINE INSTALLATION TOOLS AND MATERIALS

Tools Needed: Grinder, carborundum cutting disk, saber saw with fiberglass cutting blades, hammer, puller for prop, center punch, drill bits of 3/16", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8", and 13/32", 1-1/2" and 3" hole saws, drill motor with 1/2" chuck, 1-1/2" drum sander with coarse paper, rat-tail rasp, flat file, vise grips, tap holders, 3/8"-16 tap, 1/8" pipe tap, 15/16" short open end wrench, 13 mm, 15 mm, 17 mm, 9/16" and thin 11/16" box and end wrenches, metric and US hex wrenches, socket set, packing box wrench, chain hoist or cumalong, shop vacuum, pipe wrench, muffler cutout pattern. MATERIALS: Special Beta raised rear mounting brackets, (4) 1/2" aluminum mounting plates, up to (6) 1/2" aluminum spacer plates, siphon break consisting of a 3/4" PVC tee, 3/4" PVC street ell, (2) 3/4" MPT x 3/4" barb PVC hose adapters, 3/4" x 1/2" PVC reducer bushing, 1/2" MPT x 1/4" PVC barb, 1/8" MPT x 1/4" brass barb, (2) 3/4" x 7/8" PVC hose menders, (3) 3/4" MPT x 3/4" barb brass hose adapters, (25') 5/16" fuel hose, (3') 1/4" water hose, (14') 3/4" water hose, (6") 7/8" water hose, (12") 2" wire braid exhaust hose, (2) 1/4" #4 mini hose clamps, (14) 5/16" #5 mini hose clamps, (6) 3/4" #12 hose clamps, (4) 2" #36 hose clamps, (2) 1-7/8" #32 hose clamps, Permatex, never seize compound, masking tape, duct tape, epoxy putty, polyurethane caulking, Fasteners: (10) 3/8" x 3-1/2" hex bolts, (4) 3/8" x 1-1/4" hex bolts, (4) 3/8" x 2" hex bolts, (10) 3/8" locknuts, (18) 3/8" flat washers, (8) 3/8" lock washers, (10) 3/8" x 1-1/2" fender washers, (4) 3/4" lockwashers for mounts, (2) 3/8" x 2-1/2" bronze bolts, (4) 3/8" bronze hex nuts, (4) 3/8" bronze flat washers. If the engine is to be installed with the boat in the water you may need additional 3/8" x 2", 2-1/2" or 3" hex bolts.

Also Needed: 16" dia., 3 blade right hand prop, 32" long shaft with coupling for fixed prop, keys and nuts fitted, new bearing (1"x 1-1/2"x 4"), 3/16" stuffing box packing, stainless steel lock wire, 6" dia. X 10" long fiberglass muffler.

Needed for Two Tank Fuel System: (2) fuel selector valves with 5/16" barbs, (2) 1/4" MPT x 5/16" barb for in and out of filter, (4) 3/8" MPT x 5/16" barb for in and out of two tanks, 3/8" brass tees, nipples, and street ells for returns if needed.

Possibly Needed: Positive and Negative 1/0 battery cable, Morse 33C x 6' & 8' shift and throttle cables, new single lever control, (12') 1-7/8" exhaust hose, (4) 1-7/8" #32 hose clamps, (6) 1/4" x 1/2" hex bolts for engine room seacocks.

FULL LINER INSTALL - JUNE 2012


FULL LINER PLATES - JUNE 2012


Section G-01
WESTSAIL 32 FUEL TANKS

Most of the Westsail 32s have steel fuel tanks installed, and after 10 to 20 years they start to leak due to rusting at the seams. If yours are starting to leak, or if you decide you want to install an additional tank, I have aluminum fuel tanks available as a replacement. Some of the boats did have aluminum tanks, and as long as you can prevent electrolysis of the aluminum, this type of tank, used with diesel fuel, should last the lifetime of the boat. The important thing to remember to prevent electrolysis is not to electrically connect anything to the tank, nor to use it as part of the grounding or radio ground plane system.

Getting the old tanks out can be somewhat of a problem, but it is possible. The top front end of the tank is 21" wide, and it tapers back to 15" at the back end. The space between the tank shelf and the forward edge of the cockpit wall is about 18", so you cannot simply slide the tank off the shelf and lift it out. The early boats had a plywood shelf the tank sat on, and it can be removed to get the necessary clearance. For the boats with the molded engine room liner, one method is to cut the corner off of the fiberglass shelf, then stick it back on with epoxy putty after the new tank is in place. Another method, which one of the owners devised, is to work the tank forward, rotate the aft end up between the hull and cockpit wall until the tank is resting on its front end. Pull the tank off the shelf and rotate the front end aft so that the tank ends up upside down on top of the engine. The tank then can be taken out thru the open cockpit floor.

Before starting the tank removal job, it is necessary to remove the cockpit floor, the bilge pump for a portside replacement, and the cockpit drain hose and plastic thruhull fitting in the cockpit corner. Pull off, or cut, the outlet, return, and vent hoses. Remove the holdown allthread and angle plates. Unscrew the clamp on the fill pipe hose on top of the tank (yes it is hard to reach) and remove the screws on the fill fitting on deck and pry it up and off. Remove the cleats from the shelf, then either try the rotation of the tank to remove it, or prop up the tank and cut the corner about 15" back and as far outboard as you can reach with a saber saw, Japanese hand saw, or a carborundum hacksaw blade in a holder or held with visegrips.

The replacement aluminum tanks I make is narrower at the top forward end for ease of installation. This is especially helpful when installing an additional tank if there was never one before, as this tank will simply slide up into place without rotating it, or cutting the shelf. This tank is made 2" longer to maintain almost the same capacity.

On these new tanks the pickup fitting for the fuel system comes off of the top of the tank, with a copper tube that runs down to the bottom. This is the Coast Guard approved method for the fuel tank supply line on the tank. The tanks are made with a nipple installed for a fuel return line. The Volvo engine does not use a return hose on the fuel system, but the Perkins, and most other engines, need a return line on the fuel system. If the return is not needed, plug it with a 3/8" pipe plug.

Another useful option that is available is a sight gauge to see the level of the fuel. It consists of two special bronze valves mounted on the inboard front side of the tank with a plexiglass tube connected between them. The bottom valve has a drain on it to be able to drain fuel from the tank. Both valves can be shut off as a safety measure.

If you decide to install the sight gauge fittings, remember that the depth of insert of the upper valve is greater than that of the lower valve. Therefore the plastic tube has to be inserted into the upper valve first, then down into the lower valve. Be sure to put the brass fittings and the rubber grommets on the tube before inserting it into the valves.

Before installing the new tank, install all fitting with pipe cement, and be sure the vent hose can be easily pushed back on as it is hard to reach afterwards. Replace the fill hose with a 6" piece of 1-1/2" ID hose. Align the tank fill with the hole in the deck, and put the hose with the clamps onto the fitting on top of the tank. Push the fill fitting down with caulking under the flange, and screw it down to the deck. Hook up the hoses and clamps, and replace the base cleats and holdown brackets.

To get rid of a diesel smell in the boat, use some liquid Calgon water softener. Wipe down the affected areas, and the fumes will disappear.


Section G-01 Price List - Westsail 32 Fuel Tanks

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Fuel Tank - Aluminum fuel tank (specify port or starboard) - 38 gallon. Measure height of tank and location of fill pipe to make sure new tanks match existing locations $  450.00 each
Fuel Tank - Aluminum fuel tanks for new deck - under quarter berth or ahead of seat locker - 25 gal. Measure height of tank and location of fill pipe to make sure new tanks match existing locations 375.00 each
Fuel Sight Guage - Sight gauge valves and plastic tube with fittings welded onto tank 40.00 pkg
Fuel Tank Straps - Holdown straps and bolts for new installation. Specify type of tank and location 30.00 pkg
Fuel Pump - Electric fuel pump for bleeding and ease of starting 75.00 each
Fuel Tank Selector Switch - 3 way fuel selector valve for dual tank installation, with barbs 35.00 each
1/4" ID Type A Fuel Line Hose 2.25 foot
5/16" ID Type A Fuel Line Hose 2.25 foot
Hose Clamps - Stainless steel hose clamps for fuel line - #4 or #5 mini-clamps 1.00 each
Shipping - Approximate cost to ship tank to East Coast by FedEx Ground 75.00 each

Section G-02
WESTSAIL 32 STARBOARD FUEL TANK REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE

  1. Remove starboard cockpit drain hose, and starboard cockpit floor drain fitting. Cut fuel outlet and vent hose near tank. Remove holdown allthread and angle plates. Unscrew clamp on fill pipe and remove screws from fill cap on deck and pry up. Remove cleats from tank shelf and prop up tank.
  2. Pull tank off shelf and rotate end for end (big end aft and upside down), raising either end up and rotating so as to be able to remove it from shelf and take it out.
  3. If tank will not come out this way, and you have the fiberglass shelves, it will be necessary to cut a corner off of the tank shelf to remove the tank, then stick the corner back on after the new tank is installed. Cut corner about 15" back from front end and as far outboard and down as possible. Use a saber saw, grinder, or a carborundum hacksaw blade held with vise grips. Remove tank and clean up area.
  4. Stick corner back on with epoxy putty if you have cut it off. If you do not already have some strips on the shelf to hold the tank up so it does not sit in a puddle of water, use some 1/4" to 3/8" teak or fiber strips to do so.
  5. Install vent barb on new tank. Install pickup tube with valve and barb. Install return elbow and barb. Fit new tank back in place and prop up.
  6. Align tank fill with hole in deck. Use 1-1/2" ID x 6" hose and push fill fitting down with caulking around the flange and screw back on deck. Make sure there is an O ring to seal the fill cap. Hook up hoses and clamps. Replace cleats and holdown brackets and allthread.
  7. Replace cockpit floor drain thruhull and hose, and bilge pump if you needed to remove it.

Tools and materials needed.

Section G-03
WESTSAIL 42 AND WESTSAIL 43 TANK REPLACEMENT

The tanks are a problem because of their inaccessibility under the cabin sole. After all of these years, it is not unusual to have a steel tank rust through, or an aluminum one corrode to the point it develops a leak. Replacing the tanks is no easy matter on the boats, and the most practical approach is to isolate a leaking tank and not use it, until such time as you are preparing for a long trip, or when enough tanks are not usable so as to restrict your use of the boat.

The best approach is to remove the floor over the center tanks to reach as much as possible without cutting into the furniture, and to cut out the center tanks and remove them out the opening. Next cut the subfloor bulkheads to reach the wing tanks, and remove them by pulling them to center. Make up new tanks that will fit down the hatch, using cardboard to mockup the tanks. After the wing tanks are replaced, install the subfloor bulkheads, and then put in the center tanks.

Another possibility is to open up the existing center tanks, and use bladders inside them to hold the fuel or water. You will need to put some sort of cushioning material around the insides of the tanks to protect the bladder.

Trying to repair the tanks with fiberglass or sealing material is probably futile, especially on the fuel tanks. The pores of the metal will be so saturated with oil from the fuel, that you could not get a decent bond of the fiberglass to the base metal.

I do have drawings of three centerline tanks we made for a Westsail 43 to replace the one leaking centerline tank. The new tanks had to be small enough to go through the companionway hatch, and down through the opening in the floor.

Section G-04
ALUMINUM TANK ELECTROLYSIS

On many of the Westsail 28s, 42s and 43s, aluminum was used for both the water and fuel tanks. Aluminum has been proven to work very well for fuel, but such is not the case for water tanks. It seems that the calcium and other minerals in the water react with the aluminum, and cause growth of particles on the tank walls. Corrosion and electrolysis also cause the aluminum in the tanks to be eaten out. One unique problem that I have encountered is malfunctioning of the pressure water system on boats with the aluminum water tanks. The pressure pump would suck air and stop delivering water, even though the tank was almost full of water. This problem was traced to holes in the walls of the pickup tubes in the water tanks, caused by this pitting. These aluminum tanks usually used aluminum pickup tubes, welded to the top of the tank, and extending down to the bottom of the tank. When pinholes developed in the wall of the tube, air would be drawn into the system, and consequently the water suction on the pump would not work. The fix, of course, is to replace the pickup tubes. If the access around the pickup tube permits, then a 6" or 8" access hole is cut in the top of the tank alongside the pickup tube, and the tube cut off about 2" below the top of the tank, and a plastic hose slipped over the stub to extend from the underside of the tank top to the bottom. This replaces the pickup tube, and the system should work. A plastic screw lock type access plate can be installed to close the access hole that was cut in the tank. On another installation, there was not enough room to cut an access port, so a hole saw was used to cut the tube out of the tank, and a 1-1/2" brass water fill fitting was installed in the hole, using screws and a rubber gasket. The cap to the fitting had a hole drilled through it, and a copper tube brazed on to form the pickup. You could also just drill a hole through the cap, and insert a plastic tube through the hole to the bottom of the tank.

Quite often, builders will connect the fuel and water tanks together with a grounding wire, and use them as part of the ground plane system to aid the high seas radio antenna. This ground plane acts as a trampoline to help the antenna transmit the signal a greater distance. The disadvantage to doing this with aluminum tanks is the distinct possibility of an electrical current causing electrolysis of the aluminum, and the corrosion failure of the welds or corners of the aluminum tanks. I know that my manufacturer of tanks absolutely discourages any electrical connections on aluminum tanks because of the increased possibility of electrolysis action destroying the aluminum. We use sight gauges, or a simple stick to check the fuel level. The bottom of the tank should also be elevated slightly if it is in the bilge to permit the air to circulate under it, and the tank not sit in salt water. We usually use some teak strips under the tank to accomplish this. Painting the outside of the tank with an automobile type undercoat paint also helps.

Section G-05
SEACOCKS AND REPLACEMENT CONES

The seacocks on most of the Westsail boats are made by Groco, and they have a rubber cone in them that can be replaced if necessary. To operate these seacocks, it is necessary to loosen the tee handle a turn or two before rotating the seacock handle itself. A slight amount of water will drip while the tee handle is loose. After the seacock handle is turned, tighten up the tee handle again to seal the rubber cone. The tee handle should be tightened up just enough to stop the leaking. Over tightening of the tee handle is bad for the rubber cones. These rubber cones should be greased at every haulout.

To remove the cone, loosen the two screws on the side plate next to the handle, and remove the plate and handle. You may have to use small vise grips on the rounded screw heads to get them loose. The rubber cone is bonded to the handle. Spray it with lubricant and rock the handle back and forth while pulling on the handle to get the rubber cone out of the seacock body. There is a bronze push plate inside the seacock body that pushes against the cone when the tee handle is turned. Make sure it is in place when reassembling the seacock. It is a good idea to replace the two round head slotted screws that hold the side plate with hex bolts, as they are easier to remove with a small 7/16" box wrench. Trim off any bumps with a sharp razor blade and lubricate the rubber cone with a good non-oil based lubricant.

Unfortunately, at the present time, Groco is not supplying any replacement cones. From time to time, I have been able to locate good used seacocks and cones. Sometimes I have some available, but you need to contact me to see if I have any of the size you need.

Most of the seacocks in the boat are the 1-1/2" size, except for the engine and head inlet, which were usually 3/4". Many of the boats have an engine seawater strainer that is part of the seacock, and these are also made by Groco, and use the same design cone. Check to verify the size of the seacock that the strainer is attached to.

New ball type seacocks are available in 3/4" and 1-1/2" sizes. Buck Algonquin and Spartan both make these ball type seacocks. The ones made by Spartan have almost the same mounting hole pattern as the original seacocks, so they would make a good choice for a replacement, however they are very expensive. The Buck Algonquin ones have a three-bolt mounting, and are more reasonably priced.


Section G-05 Price List - Seacocks and Replacement Cones

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Seacock Cones - Replacement cone and handle for 3/4" old style Groco seacock,(No longer available)
Seacock Cones - Replacement cone and handle for 1-1/2" old style Groco seacock,(No longer available)
Seacock - 3/4" ball type Buck Algonquin seacock with flange to mount to hull 40.00 each
Seacock - 1-1/2" ball type Buck Algonquin seacock with flange to mount to hull 110.00 each

Section G-06
POLYETHYLENE WATER TANK FOR THE WESTSAIL 32

A polyethylene water tank for the Westsail 32 is available, the exact same size as the original stainless steel tank located under the cabin sole. It is rotationally molded and made of a heavier thickness of food grade polyethylene than those used on some of the later models made by Westsail. The tank walls are over 1/4" thick, and the tank weighs about 35 pounds. It should last forever. Capacity is about 37 to 38 gallons.

It comes with a 1-1/4" threaded plastic plug on top for filling, and a 1/2" plastic threaded outlet and vent fitting installed on the top of the tank. Plastic right angle hose barb fittings are also supplied to fit 1/2" ID hose. The outlet fitting has a tube on it that goes down to the bottom of the tank for the water pickup. Cleanout plates are also available and can be installed. Check the height of your existing tank to make sure you have a standard tank under the cabin sole. Some boats had the ballast higher than standard, or the cabin sole lower, and special tanks were made for them. Use strips of 1/4" thick plastic as runners under the tanks to give them a smooth surface to rest against so water will not collect around the tanks.

Other sizes and shapes of poly water tanks are available. Contact us and we can check the catalog of available tank sizes and shapes. Or better yet, access the manufacturers website to see their catalog. www.ronco-plastics.com. Then contact us for a price quote.



Section G-06 Price List - Polyethylene Water Tank for Westsail 32

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Polyethylene Water Tank - for Westsail 32. Size matches original standard stainless tank under cabin sole: Tank can shipped by UPS or FedEx ground. The shipping cost by FedEx ground to the East Coast is usually about $65 for one tank, and about $125 for two. Please call for current shipping costs., , Other sizes and shapes of poly water tanks are available. Contact me and I can send a catalog of available tank sizes, or give the web address of the manufacturer who has the catalog on line $  195.00 each
6" plastic clean-out installed on tank 30.00 each

Section G-07
POLYETHYLENE HOLDING TANK

A B-102 13 gallon V shaped polyethylene holding tank is available to install on the centerline under the forward berth on any of the boats. This fits in well, and a plywood top can be fitted over it to utilize the balance of the storage compartment.

A B-352 18 gallon poly tank is also available to fit under the port side of the forward berth of the Westsail 32, which is a location many of the W-32s have a holding tank. This uses space that is usually not very accessible for any other purpose, and is close to the head outlet, utilizing very short hose runs. A platform will have to be installed under the tank so that it is up near the bunktop. Holes should be drilled through the bulkhead to run the hoses into the compartment behind the sink. If this tank is mounted just under the bunktop, the bottom will be above the waterline. The tank can be emptied by gravity and does not need a pump to empty it. Install a quarter turn shutoff valve at the outlet of the tank instead of a pump.

To install the shelf, fasten 1" x 1" cleats on the bulkhead and the fore and aft divider. These cleats should be about 13" below the bunktop, and installed with the forward end about 1" higher than the aft end, to allow the tank to drain. Make a cardboard pattern of the shelf, with the outboard edge touching the hull. Cut a 1/2" plywood shelf, and fasten to the cleats with screws. The outboard edge will rest on the hullside. You may also need to cut the opening in the bunktop slightly larger to get the tank through the opening.

Other sizes and shapes of poly holding tanks are available. Contact me and I can send a catalog of available tank sizes.

The tanks come with threaded fittings installed in any location desired, and with 1-1/2" plastic barbs for the inlet and outlet, and 1/2" or 3/4" plastic elbow vent barb on top. The inlet and outlet can also be on the top, and the outlet with a standpipe tube running down to the bottom of the tank. Please specify if the locations shown on the drawing are satisfactory, or you want them in another location. Specify the size of the vent hose.

(See pricing section for current pricing information.)


Head & Holding Tank Discharge System


B-352 - 18 Gal Tank

B-102 - 13 Gal Tank

Section G-07 Price List - Polyethylene Holding Tank

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
Holding Tank - 13 gallon B-102 polyethylene V-bow tank with fittings installed $  180.00 each
Holding Tank - 18 gallon B-352 polyethylene port side under forward berth tank with fittings installed 215.00 each
Holding Tank Standpipe - on top, for discharge of tank 20.00 each
Valve - 1-1/2" bronze ball shutoff valve 65.00 each
Valve - 2 way plastic Y diverter valve - 1-1/2" hose size - Bosworth #95 42.00 each
Valve - 2 way plastic Y diverter valve - 1-1/2" hose size - Jabsco #45490 69.00 each
Deck Fitting - 1-1/2" bronze deck fitting marked "WASTE" 29.00 each
Vent Fitting - with hose barb for 5/8" hose 35.00 each
Hand Pump - 1-1/2" plastic hand pumpout pump 45.00 each
1-1/2" Plastic Tee Fittings 2.00 each
Sanitation Hose - 1-1/2" reinforced vinyl odor proof hose for system 3.50 foot
Vent Hose - 1/2" or 3/4" plastic vent hose 0.80 foot
Hose Clamps - Stainless steel hose clamps. Specify hose size 1.15 each

Section H-01
ELECTRICAL GROUNDING SYSTEMS ON A SAILBOAT

There has been a considerable amount of misunderstanding, confusion and incorrect information over the years regarding the grounding systems on boats, and I am going to attempt to clear up some of these questions in this article. A great deal of the confusion lies in the use of the term 'ground' as regards to the electrical systems on a boat. There are actually five separate electrical systems that have the name 'ground' associated with them. Quite often these systems have been electrically connected together, either by design or by misunderstanding, and I feel that they should be separate and distinct systems, each with their own purpose, and their own electrical connections.

These five systems are as follows:

  1. The negative 12 volt system from the batteries. This is used to power the 12-volt equipment on the boat, and is 'grounded' to the engine on most boats.
  2. The 'ground' wire on the 110-volt system, usually green in color, and connected to a stake driven into the ground. This is used to prevent a shock in the event the positive and neutral wires of the 110-volt system come in contact with each other through a faulty connection.
  3. The electrolysis 'ground', which is used to protect dissimilar metals on the boat when used in salt water.
  4. The radio 'ground', which is used to help the antenna of a radio or loran achieve greater distance of transmission and reception.
  5. The lightning 'ground', which is used to discharge the current from a lightning strike to the 'ground', which in this case, is the water the boat is floating in.

As you can see by these descriptions, these are five separate systems, each with its own purpose, but usually confused with each other because each has the word 'ground' associated with it. If it were not for the common use of the word 'ground', then these systems probably would not be interconnected, which is the case on most of the boats I have surveyed in recent years. Let's go over a brief description, use, and proper connections of each of these systems.

The 12-volt negative wire from the battery is usually grounded to the block on the engine. This is a holdover from the automotive industry, where the metal frame of the car is used to conduct one side of the current, and the electrical components used in a car are fastened to the frame, thereby completing the circuit. On boats, since the hull is not normally used as a conductor, then a separate wire is used to complete this circuit. These wires are usually black in color, and connected to a common buss bar, and then taken to the block on the engine. There is also a large cable, usually black in color, connected from the negative post of the battery to the engine block. This completes the circuit. It is not absolutely necessary to connect all of these wires through the block on the engine. On the new Perkins engines, the negative side on the engine is insulated, and connecting to the block will not complete the circuit. In this installation, the common negative wire from the 12-volt system is taken directly back to the battery.

On the 110-volt system, the green grounding wire should go to each outlet, and back to the connector where the power comes into the boat. This then goes to the electric box on the dock through a three wire cord, and hopefully it is then run back up the dock to land, and properly grounded. Even if it is not, the power will still work, however there is the possibility of shock while using 110-volt appliances. A ground fault interrupter is used on most new outlets, which can indicate that the ground wire is disconnected. Improper 110 volt wiring on docks is the cause of much of the electrolysis experienced on boats, as the current passes through the saltwater from dock to dock, and with your boat in between, the possibility of electrolytic action increases.

The electrolysis protection system on boats used in salt water is necessary because dissimilar metals are used, and the current will decompose one if they are connected. Since zinc is the most active of these metals, it is the one used as a sacrificial metal, and properly connected to the system, it will decompose first, thereby protecting the other metals. It should be replaced regularly, and usually can be observed crumbling from the exterior. There are some brands of zinc collars or plates that do not crumble from the exterior, but rather disintegrate on the interior, while the outside surface still looks intact. For this reason, the zincs should be replaced at every haulout, regardless of how they look. It is cheap protection. Depending on the electrolytic action on your particular boat, you may need to change the zincs more often than at each haulout. The propeller shaft needs a zinc on it, as the prop is bronze, the shaft usually stainless, and the engine coupling is steel. On the early Westsail 32s, the pintals and gudgeons were stainless, and need a zinc on each one. The bobstay fitting is stainless, and should have a zinc on it. On the Westsail 42 and 43, the rudder gudgeon is bronze, the post stainless, and a steel plate is welded to the post inside the rudder shell. A zinc should be kept on the gudgeon. There is controversy and differing opinions regarding the bronze thruhull fittings, and whether they should be connected to each other, and then to a zinc plate. It must be done if you have a metal hull boat, and also on a wood hull boat, as the current can cook the wood. Since fiberglass is such a good electrical insulator, I doubt if much current can travel between each thruhull fitting, and therefore you have each bronze thruhull fitting separate and independent, as long as metal pipe is not used in connecting the thruhull to whatever is connected to it. If hose with a wire in it is used, and the wire breaks through the inside layers of the hose, and comes in contact with the thruhull, then current can be conducted. An owner recently contacted me to replace his transmission cooler, which had corroded out. We determined that it was due to electrolysis. The cooler was an aluminum case on the side of the transmission, which had the salt water passing through it before going on to the water pump. He had wire braid hose from the thruhull, and a strand had broken and was touching on each end, thereby electrically connecting the bronze thruhull with the aluminum housing. The aluminum got eaten up. I suggested replacing the hose with one that has a nylon helix in it, as it will keep the hose from collapsing on a bend, but will not conduct current. It is probably a good idea to replace all underwater hoses on the boat with this type of hose.

A groundplane system is used on radios, especially single sideband or ham radios, which helps the signal reach out further. Many lorans also have provision to connect to a groundplane. A rectangular sintered bronze plate is usually used for this purpose (usually referred to by the trade name 'dynaplate'), and on many boats is found mounted outside the hull near the mast. Because this plate is porous, its effective area is much larger than its actual size, and therefore is designed for this purpose. Another method quite often used is to run copper strapping or copper screen throughout the boat below the waterline, with connections to the radio and to the antenna. This is ideally done in a bare hull before the furniture is installed, but can still be done in a completed boat, albeit with some difficulty.

On some installations, in order to increase the amount of surface area of metal used for the groundplane, the thruhulls, fuel and water tanks, and the engine are connected to this system. It does increase the effectiveness of the groundplane, however connecting these metal parts can cause a dramatic increase in electrolysis. I have seen aluminum tanks eaten up due to these connections, and my tank maker discourages any electrical connections on aluminum tanks.

The lightning protection system, which is very important in waters where thunderstorms and lightning strikes frequently occur, is the last of the systems, and usually the one least understood, and most often incorrectly hooked up. In a recent article I read on lightning, the bolt can be up to 100 million volts, with the core of electrical energy up to 1/2" thick, surrounded by a 4" channel of highly heated air. Since lightning tends to be attracted to, and strike, the highest object, a sailboat mast makes the perfect target. Since most of the boats have an aluminum mast, this provides an excellent conductor for the current. If you have a wood mast, then the stainless shrouds, metal sailtrack, or the wires for lights on the mast will conduct the current. If the bolt comes down the aluminum mast, when it gets to the base, it will seek a conductor to the water. If there is nothing else, it will run through the wiring on the boat, or arc across the mast support post, doing who knows what kind of damage.

It is advisable to connect a battery cable sized wire from the base of the mast, using a bronze bolt through the cabin top, down alongside the inside mast support post, then directly to the hull, with a minimum amount of bends in the wire. A 3/8" or 1/2" bronze bolt through the hull connected to this wire will discharge the electrical current, without causing a hole in the hull due to the bolt being melted by the current. On a great number of Westsail boats, a radio groundplane plate, or dynaplate, was mounted near the mast base, and the lightning discharge wire connected to it, along with radio antenna wires, and sometimes the wires connecting all of the thruhulls. As you can imagine, a lightning bolt would have a great time discharging up all of these conductors, and causing all sorts of problems. I did talk to one owner who had this connection system on the boat, and was struck by lightning. The strike was discharged, with no apparent damage, however his electric bilge pump immediately came on. He lifted the hatch boards by the mast base, and found a 1/4" stream of water coming in where the lightning discharge wire was connected, and the bolt holding the dynaplate had been burned through. I recommend that if you have a dynaplate, and a lightning discharge wire connected to it, you remove the wire, and at the next haulout install a 3/8" or 1/2" bronze bolt instead.

I hope this brief discussion on the electrical systems aboard your boat has helped clear up some of the confusion and misunderstanding surrounding the 'ground' systems on your boat. Check out your wiring, and trace and mark the wires. Then decide if any need disconnecting, or reconnecting, to achieve the intended purposes.

Section H-02
MAST ELECTRICAL WIRING PROBLEMS

Often times the blistering, with white powder residue around fittings on the aluminum mast or boom is not just a dissimilar metal corrosion problem. More often than not, the root cause can be traced to a "ground fault", or short, in the electrical system on the mast or on the boat. You can stop or prevent serious deterioration of the spar system with a simple OHM meter by performing a GROUND FAULT CHECK. On most masts, look for corrosion on the inside of any mast lights. Since most masts were built with chrome brass or potmetal lights, corrosion build-up can create a ground path through the spars. Finally, all fasteners should be properly bedded. LeFiell uses a product called "Tef-Gel", or you can use a never-seize compound.

One way to check to see if you have a really serious short is to disconnect the black negative wires at the bussbar connector, located inside the boat under the mast step. If the mast lights will still go on with this wire disconnected, then it means that the negative side of the current is being carried by the mast itself, thereby causing the electrical problems. If so, replace the lights, and maybe the wire itself inside the mast. It is preferable to use a light with a plastic base, such as the ones made by Aquasignal.

GROUND FAULT CHECK

  1. Set the OHM meter to: Ohms
    • Set the probes to: Black in (-) (common or ground side)
    • Red in (+) V - A (hot side)
  2. Attach a long electrical wire to the stainless steel part of the gooseneck. Do not attach to aluminum parts or stainless steel screws. If a good contact at the gooseneck is not available, attach to a stainless steel boom bail.
  3. Attach the other end of the above wire to the black probe on the OHM meter.
  4. Adjust the OHM meter by touching the two probes together and centering the needle to "0" (right side of the scale). With no contact of the OHM meter probes, which is an "open condition, the meter should read infinity on the OHM scale (left side of the scale).
  5. Switch batteries and electrical power panel switches to the "OFF" position, and disconnect the shore power cord, phone cord, and cable TV cord, if installed. Now touch the red probe to the negative, or ground side, of each of the 12-volt circuit switches on the back side of the boats electrical panel.
  6. If probe contact on any circuit yields a "0" or "end of the scale" OHM reading, this indicates that an electrical continuity exists between the ground wire of the circuit and the mast. This "ground fault" or "constant ground" must be traced down and eliminated to stop any further corrosion deterioration.

Most of the above information was obtained from the manager of LeFiell, the maker of the majority of the masts used on the Westsails.

Section H-03
UNDERWATER ELECTROLYSIS

On the Westsail 28s and Westsail 32s, most of the gudgeons are fiberglass, and the pintals are bronze pins. You should not have any galvanic action on the pins, as they are not in contact with any other metal. The bronze gudgeon on the W-42 and W-43 should have a zinc attached to it, as the rudder shaft is stainless steel. The early W-32s with stainless steel pintals and gudgeons should have a zinc on each pintal. The propeller shaft should always have a zinc collar or a cone over the nut, and it should be checked twice a year, and replaced if badly pitted. The stainless steel bobstay fitting should have a zinc attached to it, as I have seen a number of these get pitted out by electrolysis. Use a pair of small round zinc plates normally used on metal rudders, and attach through the bottom hole in the bobstay fitting, or drill an extra hole near the bottom corner of the fitting.


Serious Electrolosis Damage

ELECTROLYSIS CAUSED BY WIRE IN HOSE

Many of the newer engines have a Hurth transmission, and sometimes there is an aluminum cooler bolted to the side of the transmission case. This has the seawater running through it to cool off the transmission case. On two boats that have had a problem, the aluminum cooler has corroded, and leaked where the water hose enters it from the seacock. The problem has been traced to electrolysis of the aluminum, caused by it being electrically connected to the bronze seacock by the wire reinforcing inside of the hose.

The simple fix for this problem is to use a hose that does not have any wire in it, thereby preventing the electrical connection that causes electrolysis. The hose is 1-1/8" inside diameter to fit on the aluminum cooler, and I do have some vinyl hose, with a nylon helix in it to prevent collapsing. You can also use a good grade of heater hose, if there are no bends that will kink. First check to see if the hose has wire in it, then remove the hose from the cooler end, and inspect the condition of the cooler to make sure it has not been eaten up by electrolysis, and replace the hose if it has wire in it. If you need a new cooler, you can get one from a transmission distributor.

It is probably a good idea that when you replace hoses attached to seacocks, use one that does not have a wire in it, even though most do not attach to a fitting that has an electrical current in it.

Section H-03 Price List - Underwater Electrolysis

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
New Internal Bobstay Fitting - stainless steel for W28 or W32 $  195.00 each
New External Bobstay Fitting - stainless steel for W32 with fasteners 295.00 each
New Internal Bobstay Fitting - stainless steel for W42 or W43 225.00 each
Zinc - disc for bobstay fitting, round with fastener 5.00 each

Section H-04
ALUMINUM TANK ELECTROLYSIS

Quite often, builders will connect the fuel and water tanks together with a grounding wire, and use them as part of the ground plane system to aid the high seas radio antenna. This ground plane acts as a trampoline to help the antenna transmit the signal a greater distance. The disadvantage to doing this with aluminum tanks is the distinct possibility of an electrical current causing electrolysis of the aluminum, and the corrosion failure of the welds or corners of the aluminum tanks. Possibly this is what has caused a failure of your aluminum tank.

I know that my manufacturer of tanks absolutely discourages any electrical connections on aluminum tanks because of the increased possibility of electrolysis action destroying the aluminum. We use sight gauges, or a simple stick to check the fuel level. The bottom of the tank should also be elevated slightly if it is in the bilge to permit the air to circulate under it, and the tank not sit in salt water. We usually use some teak strips under the tank to accomplish this. Painting the outside of the tank with automobile type undercoat paint also helps.

ALUMINUM BUBBLING OF THE PAINT ON A MAST

The bubbling of the aluminum and the paint around any of the stainless steel fittings attached to the mast is a typical problem, and considering the thickness of the aluminum metal on this mast, it is not a serious problem, only a cosmetic one. If you decide to repair it, then you should remove all of the stainless parts attached to the mast. Then scrape all of the loose material down to solid aluminum. Sand the mast well, clean it with a solvent, and fill any of the corroded areas with epoxy putty. Sand it smooth, then paint the mast with a suitable primer and polyurethane paint, which can be done easily with a roller and brush.

When you reinstall the stainless parts, create a barrier between the stainless and aluminum so this will not happen again. An easy way to create a barrier is to use one or two layers of silver duct tape, cut to fit the area that will be touching the mast. Then use Tefgel paste on all of the fasteners to permit them to be removed easily in the future.

DIODE AND FUSE IN THE ALTERNATOR CIRCUIT

I have had inquiries regarding the diode and fuse in the alternator charging circuit of the engine on many of the boats. The diode is a red semi-circular piece, and was used because the early battery disconnect switches would break the circuit if you switched from one battery to the other, or if you switched through the OFF position. This would blow the diodes inside the alternator. We used this additional diode to prevent this occurrence.

The fuse is a cartridge type in a clamp type holder, and is rated at 50 to 75 amps, depending on the capacity of the alternator. The fuse was used to protect the engine wiring in case of a short. On one of the early boats, the Volvo engine wiring on the panel got wet with salt water, and burned up all the wires before we could get the battery disconnected. This occurred while we were sea trialing the boat. We then used a 60-amp fuse to hope it would blow before the wiring caught fire. If you install an alternator with greater than the original 55 amp capacity, the fuse rating size should be increased to just above the rated capacity of the alternator. Carry some spare fuses, or install a circuit breaker instead.

Section J-01
STAINLESS STEEL FAILURES

I may have touched on this subject in previous articles, and at most of the rendezvous, but since it is recurring more often, and can possibly result in a very expensive repair, I feel it needs to be discussed and stressed once again. As much as we would like to think stainless steel is a "forever" material, it unfortunately is not, and also usually does not reveal its weakness until it fails. Stainless steel will corrode, and is subject to stress and corrosion cracking within the structure of the metal, while the exterior surface may still appear to be in perfect, shiny condition. This is unlike plain steel, which rusts from the outside, and is plainly visible, or aluminum, which also shows its corrosion on the exterior surfaces.

RIGGING SWAGE ENDS

The classic example is of swaged terminal fittings on the ends of the standing rigging, primarily at the lower ends. Water comes down the wire, and gets into the swage fitting, causing cracks to start on the fitting, especially those that have been highly stressed due to overswaged. Fortunately, the majority of the swaging on the Westsails was done correctly, and the rigging has lasted 20 years or so, although most rigging shops recommend replacing the standing rigging every 10 years.

CHAINPLATES

I have recently had a number of calls regarding problems with the chainplates, primarily on the Westsail 42s and 43s. The stock chainplates used on all of the boats are 1/4" x 2" x 24" pieces of 304 grade stainless steel. The W28 and W32 have four 3/8" square holes to mount them, with 3/8" carriage bolts. The W42 and W43 have five 1/2" carriage bolts. We have found cracks radiating out from the square holes on the chainplates, and it has been necessary to replace some of the chainplates. There have also been instances of the chainplate starting to deteriorate on the backside where it meets the hull, due to water being trapped there, and crevice corrosion starting. Since the caulking is original, and it also does not last forever, the water gets between the fiberglass and the stainless, and corrosion starts. I now have chainplates with round mounting holes available, with button head Allen bolts. Request them if you do not want the square holes.

Upon making some replacement chainplates for a W42, I discovered that on some of Westsail drawings for the chainplates, it called for the square holes to be .60" in size, which is really too big for a .50" bolt, and the carriage bolt can rotate in the hole, and also the bolt does not fit the chainplate hole properly to distribute the load over all of the bolts. On the W42s and W43s, it would probably be a good idea to remove some of the 1/2" carriage bolts, and carefully check for the start of cracks radiating out from the square holes, and for the size of the hole.

If you are preparing for a major voyage, it would also be a good idea to remove at least one chainplate, in order to be able to inspect the backside, and also check the condition of the carriage bolts. The top end should also be checked periodically for signs of cracks at the bend, or around the hole the turnbuckle attaches to. If the top of the chainplate has been bent from hitting a piling or seawall (by a previous owner, of course), you might want to carefully clean the chainplate with a Scotch-brite pad, and inspect it with a magnifying glass, and maybe some dye penetrant.

BOOMKIN STAY TANGS

A major problem point on the W32 is the boomkin stay tang bolted to the hull. The early boats had a 1" wide tang, with a 1/2" clearance hole for the pin on the stay, leaving less than 1/4" of metal around the hole. The condition of the metal around the hole is not readily visible for inspection because it is covered with the toggle end of the stay. Being in and out of the water, and flexed with loads, the end of this tang can develop unseen cracks and hole elongation. The failure of this tang has caused the loss of the entire rig on a number of instances. After 1976, the width of the tang was increased to 1-1/4" wide, giving enough cross section area around the hole to prevent elongation. I have now increased the width to 1-1/2" for added security. At every haulout the turnbuckle on the stay should be loosened, the pin on the toggle end pulled out, and the end of the tang carefully inspected for fractures. The hull tangs for the bowsprit whisker stays never seem to have any problems (except if you have been running into pilings), but they should be checked in any event as a precaution. It is probably a good idea to remove these tangs and check the backside periodically for signs of crevice corrosion or stress cracks. The boomkin crosspiece must also be carefully inspected for signs of corrosion or electrolysis as shown in the second example.

Boomkin Tang Failure

Boomkin Crosspiece Failure

SPREADER TANGS

I had one owner inform me of a problem with cast stainless steel spreader attachments on the Superspar and Royal Marine masts on a Westsail 43. It seems that Superspar used a stainless steel casting for the attachment to the mast to hold the spreaders, and the castings were defective. The flaws are on the backside, and cannot be checked without removing the fitting from the mast. Fortunately, the majority of the masts made for the Westsails are from LeFiell, who used a welded stainless bracket, and I have not heard of any failures on them. If you have never serviced your mast, it is probably time to take it off the boat, remove and service the sheeves, remove and inspect all of the fittings and bolts, and possibly repaint the mast.

Section J-02
LEAKS AND DRY ROT

Leaks are a constant source of annoyance on any boat, and coupled with the possibility of rot on any wood that becomes soaked with fresh water, they are something that needs to be attended to if you are going to properly maintain your boat, and want to prevent some very costly repairs. Since most of the Westsail boats are getting to be 25 to 30 years old, it is only reasonable to assume that it is now time to recaulk all of the deck hardware. Caulking does not have an indefinite life, and since the 1970's there have been improvements in the types of caulking available, it is only reasonable to assume that it is now time to renew the caulking on most of the hardware installed on the boats.

The three primary types of caulking available are polyurethane, polysulphide (in one or two part systems), and silicone. The silicone is a good sealant for waterproofing, but has poor strength qualities. It is usually necessary to use silicone if you are caulking plastic fittings, as the other caulkings may attack the plastic. If you do want to use the other caulkings on a plastic fitting, test it on a hidden spot to see if the caulking attacks the plastic. Polyurethane has excellent strength qualities, dries quickly, and is used universally around the boat on any metal to fiberglass fittings. For caulking wood to fiberglass, or wood to wood, I prefer to use polysulphide. The one part does take longer to dry tack free, usually a day or so, but the caulking has excellent strength and flexibility properties. If you are caulking the seams on a teak deck, I now recommend the one part Teak Decking Systems caulking. Follow the instructions on the caulking as to the cleanliness of the joint, and the need for a primer on wood to wood surfaces.

For the best results when caulking, use lots of masking tape. You should put a strip of masking tape on each side of the seam to be caulked, force the caulking in, then smooth it out with a putty knife, a rounded dowel, or your finger, and let the excess smear over onto the masking tape. After you are satisfied with the caulking job, carefully pull off the masking tape, and you will end up with a perfectly defined caulked seam, no mess, and no cleanup to do. You will not have to touch the caulked seam, or use solvents to clean up the excess, and thereby prevent disturbing the caulked seam before it has a chance to properly cure.

There is always the potential for rot on any wood other than teak, and this includes the bowsprit, sampson posts, rudder cheeks, and boomkin on the W28 and W32. The plywood in the deck and cabintop core is also subject to rotting if it gets wet, as well as the plywood used on the main sliding wood hatches. The best method found to prevent this rot is to use a saturating epoxy resin, such as 'West System' Epoxy, or 'Git Rot' Penetrating Epoxy. If you seal all of the wood with a coat or two of epoxy prior to the installation, then even if water does enter the seam, the wood still should not rot. On openings cut through the deck, the edges of the plywood should be sealed with epoxy, especially when the sampson posts go through the deck, or any ventilator holes are drilled, and where the plastic tube goes through the deck step to carry the mast wires into the boat. If you are remounting any hardware on the deck or cabin top, all of the holes should be drilled, then the edges of the hole should be sealed with the epoxy before the part is finally installed. Use a cotton swab stick for this, or put a piece of masking tape on the underside of the hole, pour resin in the hole, let it sit a few minutes, then put a can under the hole and pull the tape, letting the excess run into the can. Put masking tape on the deck to the outside edge of where the caulking will be, and use lots of caulking to bed the fitting. Smooth out the caulked seam, then pull the tape.

If it has never been done before, you should remove the portlights, stanchions, and hawse pipes and renew the caulking under them. If you have the 2" spun brass deck scuppers, they should be caulked in place, as they cannot be removed without destroying them. If you do remove them, I have fiberglass tubing available to replace them, which is installed with epoxy putty for a permanent replacement. The caulking should be renewed around the sampson posts on the W32, and around the caprails. Using masking tape on the caprails, you should be able to get a good seam on both sides to help prevent hull to deck leaks. Check for rot, or soft wood, on all of the fittings attached to the bowsprit and boomkin. A sharp pocket knife pushed in around each fitting should give you an indication if there are any problems here. The wood cheeks on the rudder also are prone to rotting, but that is not a structural problem, as there is a metal box under them that takes the rudder to tiller loads.

BOBSTAY FITTING LEAKS

A slight weeping problem of the bobstay fitting is not too unusual. I have heard of it happening to some boats. As long as the inside glassing is good, then cleaning out and re-packing the outside of the slot against the fitting is correct. I use a polyurethane caulking rather than an epoxy putty, as it is more flexible, and should hold out the water and last longer than epoxy. Use masking tape to mask off the seam width on the hull and the fitting, put on the bead of caulking, force it into the crack, then wipe off the excess with a small rounded tool or stick. Pull the tape after about a half-hour, and you will have a clean caulked seam. Move some weight out of the bow and into the stern to raise the fitting above the water if you are doing this job while still afloat. Be sure to put a piece of zinc on the bobstay fitting to prevent electrolysis.

HULL TO DECK JOINT LEAKS - ORIGINAL WESTSAIL 32 HULL MOLD

If your boat is one of the early ones, it was made with a wooden sheer clamp bonded to the inside top edge of the hull, and used as a flange to fasten down the deck. After the deck was set on the wooden edge with caulking, it was fastened down with screws, then the exterior edge between the hull and deck was filled with a polyester putty to seal the edge. On some of these installations, the putty has cracked out, and let water in through the joint.

I would recommend checking and testing this area on the exterior side of the hull just under the caprail for leaks. If found, clean out the brittle putty and caulk with a good grade of polyurethane caulking. Use masking tape on either side of the seam, squeeze in the caulking well with a putty knife, then pull the tape for a clean, well caulked seam.

Section J-03
HULL BLISTERS

Westsails have not experienced a severe amount of underwater blistering of the hull, however I have seen some boats with blisters. I firmly believe that all fiberglass boats will eventually blister, and that sometime in the life of the ownership of your boat, it would be a good idea to apply a protective barrier to the underwater surface to prevent the possibility of moisture getting under the gelcoat and causing blistering. Because the hull is solid fiberglass and the layup is so thick, and not cored with a thin outer skin, some surface blistering, of up to 1/8" to 3/16" deep, would not be considered a structural problem.

If you do not have blisters now, I would not recommend doing anything to the bottom except painting. Quite often the pimple type blisters are in the bottom paint only, and do not affect the gelcoat. Try scraping off some bottom paint to see if the gelcoat is still intact. If you do have extensive blistering, and decide to protect the entire bottom, the current accepted procedure is to remove all of the bottom paint, then let the hull dry out. The bottom paint can be removed with a chemical remover, sanding, or sandblasting. If you do sandblast, be sure the operator is experienced, and does not sandblast so much as to remove all of the gelcoat and rough up the fiberglass so as to cause the necessity to fill and fair the hull again. This is an extremely labor intensive process, and can get very expensive. It usually is not necessary in most cases. The gelcoat peeling machines also require extensive re-fairing of the hull, and I would not recommend that being done except as a last resort for extremely severe blistering, and only upon recommendation of a competent marine surveyor.

In your area it might take being put into a heated building, or tenting the boat and using a portable heater to properly dry the hull. During this drying out process, which may take many months, break any large blisters and clean them out. If you have very small, pimple type blisters, sand the hull with a disc sander with a soft pad to open them up, and clean the hull with acetone. Clean out the bilges, and remove any standing water. The hull needs to dry out from the inside also. Check the moisture content of the fiberglass with a moisture meter, and when it is down to the recommended moisture level, the coating process can begin. After the hull is dried, and all blisters cleaned out, coat the blistered areas with two layers of an epoxy resin, then fill with an epoxy putty. The hull should then be covered with a minimum of five coats of epoxy resin, rolled on with rollers. I prefer using a color tint in the resin, alternating with a light and dark colors to be able to visually see that the coatings are covering evenly. Gudgeon Brothers, in their West System epoxy treatment, also recommends an aluminum powder additive to create a more water resistant coating. After the epoxy treatment, apply the bottom paint best suited for your area. Be sure to clean out the bilges, and coat that area with two coats of epoxy paint.

Section J-04
BOAT VALUES

As a result of numerous purchase surveys during the past years, I have noted that the selling prices on all models of the Westsail boats has gone up, and are continuing to rise. There is a shortage of well built cruising sailboats that are easy to restore, and bring up to top condition. The Westsail line happens to be a favorite of smart yacht brokers when knowledgeable buyers are looking for a good cruising sailboat. With about 1100 boats built by Westsail from 1972 to 1982, there are always a fair number of boats on the market at any one time. The selling prices have averaged about a 3% to 5% rise every year for many years now. The cost of replacing the boat in the event of a total loss is usually more than the insured value, if you have owned the boat for five years or longer. You might want to consider taking a close look at your insurance policy, and checking to see if you will realize enough in the event of a total loss to replace the boat and all of her equipment.

The Westsail boats are one of the few lines of boats that are worth more now, at 35 to 40 years old, as they were when they were new during the 1970's.

The original cost of an average complete Westsail 32 in the early 1970s was $30,000 to $40,000. In the latter part of the 1970s the cost went up to about $50.000. 1980 was the last year the factory operated to build complete boats. On the resale market during the 1980s, the boats generally sold in the range of $35,000 to $45,000. Now, in 2011, a well found or restored Westsail 32 is selling in the $65,000 to $75,000, or more, price range. One has to wonder why these boats continue to go up in value as the years go by, while most people expect depreciation to take its toll, and values to decrease. I think most of this is tied to the current cost of replacement, or in others words, the cost of purchasing a similar new boat today, if you can find one built as well. I would estimate that a new Westsail 32 in 2011 would sell in the $350,000 price range.

The Westsail 28, 42, and 43 have shown similar increases in value, but probably not as dramatic as that of the 32.

Section J-05
SOME RANDOM OBSERVATIONS AFTER MANY SURVEYS

I have been doing quite a number of surveys these past years, as the boats have been changing hands, and also many of the insurance companies are now requiring an updated survey to reinsure or change the valuation. The market value has been steadily going up on all of the Westsail boats, so you might want to evaluate the amount of insurance you now carry to be sure it will replace the boat in the event of a total loss.

I know I have mentioned this recurring problem in many past articles, but it is worth repeating again now, due to another failure and loss of a mast on a Westsail 32. This problem I am referring to is the boomkin stay attachment on the Westsail 32. The early boats had a wooden crosspiece, a U bolt for the backstay attachment, and 1" tangs on the boomkin and on the hull. The next change was a 2" x 2" angle stainless crosspiece, and the final change was a 2" x 4" stainless crosspiece, and the hull tangs were widened to 1-1/4".

If you still have the 1" tangs on the hull, by all means replace them with wider ones. The 1" ones have failed, both at the end where the stay is attached, and at the bolt where it is attached to the hull. The metal piece needs additional width around to hole to have sufficient strength, and 1-1/4" wide will do it. If you still have the wooden crosspiece, then I would highly recommend replacing it with a metal one. A recent failure, with the subsequent need to replace the mast, was of the 3/8" bolt holding the upper tang to the crosspiece, as this is the weak point in the entire standing rigging system. The U bolt in this case had also broken on one leg, inside the wood, and was only holding by one of the 1/4" legs. Some of the 2" x 2" stainless crosspieces have bent up slightly, but I have not seen one of these fail. You might want to have a reinforcement piece welded to the vertical part of the angle as a reinforcement, if you are heading offshore. I do have the 2" x 4" stainless crosspieces available as a replacement.

Check the stays themselves for cracks in the swaged fittings, or broken strands in the wire. If they are the original stays, and now 25 to 30 years old, you should replace them for peace of mind. Also carefully check the wood on the boomkin itself for signs of rot or cracks, especially on the end under the metal crosspiece, and around the bolts holding them to the deck. Check the attachment bolts for signs of bending, or movement of the boomkin forward along the deck.

We have found that the majority of the boats have a wood sliding main hatch, made from a sheet of plywood, covered with teak. Over the years the water comes through the teak and saturates the plywood backing. This backing then delaminates or rots, due to the humidity in the boat and lack of ventilation. Most of the hatches do not have anything on the plywood to protect them, as they were originally oiled, and because the plywood is not usually visible as the hatch is open, the finish is not maintained. We would recommend sealing the plywood with two coats of West or similar saturating epoxy, then painting or varnishing. If the plywood is delaminated, or rotted, you might want to fill in with epoxy putty, or in extreme cases, rebuild the hatch using new plywood.

We have found termite infestation on a number of boats. Yes, the wood eating flying termites found in most houses do love to go sailing once in a while and feast on plywood and fir that is not kept sealed with varnish or paint. They normally do not attack teak, but will go for mahogany. We have found termite damage in the plywood on the main sliding hatch, on the sampson posts and chain locker bulkhead, the boomkin, and the rudder cheeks. In an extreme case, they got into the wood trim on the interior of the boat, and in the plywood core on the cabintop. If you do find the telltale droppings, or holes in the wood, you need to seal and fumigate the boat to be sure and get rid of them. If they are only on the exterior wood, then a treatment with one of the insecticide sprays, and sealing the wood with saturating epoxy should take care of the problem.

The paint on the mast on most boats will show some bubbling after all of these years, especially around the stainless fittings and stainless screws. This is linear polyurethane paint, and stands up very well to the elements, but after 35 to 40 years the paint does degrade (yes, the first Westsail we built was No. 37 in the spring of 1972). In many cases, you can scrape the worst of the places, prime with a zinc chromate primer, and touch up with a one-part urethane or epoxy paint. After all of these years, if the mast has never been removed and properly serviced, then you might consider taking it down, removing all of the hardware, and refinishing the paint, replacing all of the wiring in the mast, and lubricating the sheaves. If you do decide to tackle this job, and need any replacement parts, contact me and we should be able to get them for you. Most of the masts were made by LeFiell, and they are still in business. The other mast builders were Sparcraft (now part of IMI Kenyon and still in business) and Superspar and Royal Marine (not in business, but some of the other mast builders parts are interchangeable). If you have a fixed base on the mast, as opposed to the tabernacle, a potential problem area is with water collecting inside the mast at the base, and causing degradation of the aluminum at the bottom of the mast, or rot in the plywood core of the boss on deck that supports the mast. There should be a small hole drilled in the side of the mast about 1/2" above the base to let water drain and air inside to keep it dry. Stick a coathanger in the hole from time to time to be sure it is clear.

If you have noticed cracking of the gelcoat on the centerline of the hull at the bow and stern, do not be too alarmed as this is cosmetic and not structural. Since the hull on most of the boats was made in two pieces, and centerbonded together from the inside while the boat was still in the mold, the structural integrity is there, but the seam on the outside needed to be ground smooth, filled with putty, and touched up with gelcoat. This putty tends to harden and not flex with age, and the gelcoat cracks or lifts. If you have noticed this condition, and it is prevalent on most boats, and want to cosmetically repair it, then fill the cracks with an epoxy putty, and touch up the gelcoat.

Section J-06
LARGE AND SMALL MUSTS ON A CRUISING BOAT

I went sailing for a few days in the Eastern Mediterranean off the coast of Turkey on the Westsail 32 "E. GALOIS" with Francis and Claire Perey. They sailed the boat over a three years ago, and I have been fortunate to spend a few days with them each year. I want to devote this article to what I consider to be a series of "musts" to have on a proper cruising boat. Some of the "musts" are small ones, to make life more comfortable, and some are large "musts", that you should not cruise without. These are of course my opinions, for what they are worth, and others might disagree with me, or add their own list of "musts".

On the list of large "musts", I would include an easily reefed mainsail, roller furling jib, and a dodger over the main companionway hatch, with removable side wings. Most of the boats that are only locally cruised do not have a good reefing system setup for the mainsail, but for offshore sailing it is imperative to have the main reefing setup to be easily done. The adage of "if you think you should reef the main, it is already too late" is only too true for the offshore cruiser, especially if you are traveling with a small crew. The same ease of reefing goes for the jib, and with the perfection of roller furling by the round the world racers, it is foolish not to take advantage of the ease and safety of reefing and furling the jib without having to go out on the end of the bowsprit in adverse condition. A good dodger will permit you to push through headseas with a reasonable amount of comfort, especially with side wings installed to keep the spray off of the cockpit. The frame should be of 1" stainless steel tubing, with a brace down on the back end to make it rigid, and handles on the upper corners to grab hold of when going forward.

The lists of small "musts" is more extensive, and some sailors would also consider many of these to be large also. They include a lightweight inflatable dingy, solar panels to keep the batteries charged, an amp hour usage meter, sailing awning over the cockpit, a jackline on deck to hook your safety line to, shock cord on the boom to furl the mainsail, a fathometer with alarm, and the anchors painted white. The debate over a proper dingy will always rage on amongst the cruising sailors, some opting for a hard dingy, some for a rigid inflatable with a large outboard, and some for a very lightweight inflatable, so that it is easily taken on and off the boat. I would opt for the lightweight inflatable, unless you have the room, and a convenient way of lifting up a rigid bottom inflatable, with a large outboard motor.

Solar panels have come down in price, and if they are mounted permanently, such as on a bracket over the stern pulpit, or on top of the cockpit dodger frame, they will keep the batteries charged for most of the time. A good amp hour usage meter will indicate the condition of the batteries, and these are made by a number of suppliers. They digitally read up or down, depending on whether a charge is going into, or coming out, of the batteries. These are far superior to the voltmeters that only read percentage of charge. The fathometer should be one with an alarm, especially one that can be set while anchored, so that if you drag, either into shallow or deep water, the alarm sounds. Having a portable fish finder type fathometer, battery powered, with a transducer tied to a stick, will give you a method of sounding a harbor from your dingy, plus a spare in case the primary fathometer decides to quit. Using shock cord on the main boom to furl the sail works easier than having loose sail ties, and saves looking for the ties each time, and attaching them to the boom prior to lowering the sail. Some padeyes on one side of the boom, and hooks on the other side, spaced between them, with a piece of shock cord strung through the padeyes will work well. The idea of painting the anchors white is one I saw for the first time on this last trip, and is an excellent way to tell where the anchor is, and if it is dug in. Of course, you need to be in clear water, but why go cruising if you can't be in clear waters.

Section J-07
MANUALS

CONSTRUCTION MANUAL AND BLUEPRINTS

We have copies of the original factory construction manuals. There are about 605 pages for the Westsail 32, and I also have the manual on a CD. There are 275 pages for the W28, 470 pages for the W43, and 290 pages for the W43. We can make up a copy for you. We also have blueprints of the sailplan, and the hull profiles for about $10.00 each.

The blueprints of the tankage and subfloor bulkheads for the Westsail 43 are also available. Some of the hull section lines are also available. Contact bud@westsail.com if you have specific drawings you would like, and if we have them, we will make copies.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION MANUALS

We have copies of the shop manuals for the Volvo 2 and 3 cylinder engines and the MD-22L, the Isuzu engine, the Perkins 4-108 and M-50 engines, and the Beta 38 (1505) and 43 (1903) engines. These detail the disassembly and rebuilding of the engine and transmission. We also have copies of the parts lists for many of the engines. We can make copies of any of these manuals if you need them, for the cost of $20.00 in most cases. Contact us for the particular engine or transmission that you have to make a copy.

VOLVO MD2B ENGINE MANUAL

The original Volvo MD2B's and MD 3Bs had a starter/generator, belt driven off the flywheel. Later models had a starter with ring gear on the flywheel, and a belt driven alternator. We have copies of the original manual for both models.

EQUIPMENT MANUALS

Due to many kind donations from other owners, and our extensive list of information, we have available copies of instruction manuals for some the equipment originally installed. These include the Hi-Seas diesel cabin heater, Ritchie compass, Sayes Rig windvane, Monitor windvane, Aires windvane, etc. Contact bud@westsail.com if you need information on the equipment aboard, and you do not have a service or parts manual.

Section J-07 Price List - Manuals

Note: Online ordering is coming soon. For now, please contact Bud directly at bud@westsail.com

Description Price   Unit
W28 Construction Manual Printed - (275 pages) $  45.00 each
W28 CD of the Construction Manual and Owners Manuals 10.00 each
W32 Construction Manual Printed - (605 pages) 75.00 each
W32 CD of the Construction Manual and Pictures - (460 pages) 10.00 each
W42 Construction Manual Printed - (470 pages) 60.00 each
W42 CD of the Construction Manual and Pictures - (470 pages) 10.00 each
W43 Construction Manual Printed - (290 pages) 45.00 each
Engine Workshop Manuals Printed - Specify make and model of engine 20.00 each
Blueprints - Specify what you want 7.50 each

Section J-08
EXCESSIVE TILLER LOAD, SAIL TRIM AND BALANCE

I have had a number of owners ask about excessive pressure needed on the tiller to steer a Westsail 32 or 28. Carrying too much sail aft, and not enough forward, primarily causes the problem of the excessive pressure needed to steer the boat. Another cause is too much belly in the mainsail. Any sailboat will have this problem if the center of sail area is moved too far aft. The original sail plan of the Westsail 32 was found to not have enough sail area in the standard working jib (177 square feet), and too much in the main. This caused excessive weather helm, and large loads on the tiller. The sailplan was then change to include a yankee jib of about 300 square feet, which went the entire length of the headstay, and Kern sailmakers recommends an even larger yankee, dubbed a "Super Yankee" by him, of about 400 square feet. He also makes the foot of the mainsail shorter by about 12" to 18", and the boat will balance out much better. A flatter cut mainsail will also eliminate some of the weather helm.

There have been a few Westsail 32s converted to wheel steering, yet a wheel will not help the rudder pressure due to sail trim, but you will have more power available to turn the rudder. The downside is that you will lose sensitivity to trim when the wind is light. There have been a few Westsails rigged with wheel steering, but I do not think it is the answer, especially with the large rudder the Westsail has.

It is far better to practice trimming the sails, setting a large jib out ahead of the staysail, reducing sail area of the main, etc. to balance out the boat and relieve pressure on the rudder. It is also important to properly trim the mainsail to get effective drive from it.

Section J-09
MAST SERVICING

One of the most important, but usually least looked after parts of the boat is the mast and rigging. Fortunately, Westsail supplied a mast section and standing rigging on the boats that was oversize for the sail area, and there have not been many mast failures that I have heard of.

If you have not done so in all these years, the mast should be lowered, the sheaves at the masthead removed, cleaned, and lightly greased, and all of the fittings carefully checked. On many of the masts, the linear polyurethane paint has bubbled up around the stainless fittings, caused by the contact of the stainless with the aluminum. When replacing the fittings, it is wise to insulate the fitting away from the mast to minimize this problem, and an easy way to do this is to use a layer or two of silver duct tape on the back of all fittings, and also use Neverseize compound on the screws.

On masts with a closed base, it is very important to have a small drain hole drilled into the side of the mast just above the base to let any water out, and let air in. Rainwater can enter the top of the mast, and naturally collects at the bottom, and needs to be drained out. If not, you will experience corrosion of the aluminum at the base of the mast, severe bubbling of the paint, and possible water entry into the plywood core of the raised boss on the cabintop. If water gets into the plywood and causes rot, then it becomes a major job to remove the core from the raised boss, rebuild it, and fiberglass over. I know of a few owners that have had to do this, and it was not of your more pleasant or inexpensive jobs.

A fairly easy repair of a dished down mast boss on the cabintop can be accomplished with the following procedure. Take the mast off, and remove the aluminum base on the cabintop. Carefully cut the fiberglass just inside the exterior line of the mast base with a router. Remove the fiberglass piece, and remove all of the soft plywood, possibly going all the way down to the fiberglass on the inside of the deck lamination if necessary. Saturate the area with epoxy resin. Build up the removed wood area with solid wood, saturated with epoxy resin, then stick the fiberglass piece back down. Fill the routed groove with epoxy putty. Now reinstall the aluminum mast base, and since it covers the groove, there will not be any gelcoat repair necessary.

Normal maintenance of the mast would include careful inspection to look for loose bolts, cotter pins gone from the clevis pins, fractures of the welded bases of the spreaders, elongation of the holes on the inboard base of the spreaders, fractures of the stainless spreader brackets attached to the mast, and seizing of the sheaves on the masthead. If you periodically apply a coat of wax to the mast surface, it will keep it clean as well as protect it. Using a good rubbing compound will usually clean up the halyard marks on the mast, and then applying wax will generally restore most of the finish on the mast. The bubbling can be scraped off, primed with a zinc chromate primer, and touched up with an epoxy paint.

A majority of the Westsail 32s, and many of the 28s, were supplied with a tabernacle mast base, yet most owners have never attempted to lower their mast themselves. The procedure is not difficult, and as long as care is taken while doing it, it is a relatively safe and easy procedure, albeit somewhat scary the first time through. See page A-21 for the procedure.

Section J-10
SURVEY INFORMATION AND COSTS

Westsail Parts Company offers the following survey services to all Westsail owners.

MINI-SURVEY

A short inspection of about thirty items that are the critical points that have failed on other boats and have caused subsequent damage. A one page form is used to inspect the items and note their condition. Time required for this survey is approximately 1/2 hour. The cost of this survey is $15.00, provided I happen to be where the boat is located. During any of the Westsail rendezvous, there is no charge for this survey when done during the rendezvous. If you want to do the inspection yourself, send in a request and I will send you the form to do your own inspection.

COMPLETE SURVEY

CONDITION, EQUIPMENT INVENTORY AND VALUATION SURVEY

- for the purpose of sale or purchase of a used boat, or as a requirement for insurance coverage.

CRUISE CONDITION AND EQUIPMENT SURVEY

- for the purpose of an offshore trip or long distance cruise.

DAMAGE SURVEY AND REPAIR COST ESTIMATE

- for the purpose of assessing the damage to a vessel and preparing a cost estimate for the repairs.

A seven page form is used to inspect and inventory the entire vessel, carefully inspecting all of the construction of the boat, noting the make and model of the equipment, the methods used in the installation, current condition, and suitability for this type of vessel. The inspection does check for compliance with current standards and USCG regulations.

A six to eight page report is supplied, as well as a copy of the seven page inventory sheets for the condition and equipment surveys.

A report of the damage, vessels condition and repair procedure, along with cost estimates to affect the repairs, is supplied for the damage survey.

These surveys are accepted by most insurance companies and lending institutions, although I do not belong to one of the surveyers associations. If necessary, I can supply a resume of my experience and qualification as a surveyor to the insurance company if so requested.

The time required to complete this type of survey is approximately four to six hours, and it is customary to have the boat hauled out for the bottom inspection during this survey.

If you are interested in my doing a survey of a boat, I would be happy to do so. The normal cost is $300.00 for the survey and report. If it is out of my local area, and providing I have at least one other survey to do at the same time and location, there will be no charge for air transportation, but there will a charge for a rental car for the day.

Section J-11
BOATMOVING DIMENSIONS

(Shipping dimensions may vary slightly.)

WESTSAIL 28

WESTSAIL 32

WESTSAIL 42

WESTSAIL 43

The final height on the trailer depends on the type of trailer used by the trucking company. Some have a dropped center rail the will allow a boat that will not go on some trailers to fit under the height limit without removing pulpits or boom gallows. However, sometimes it is cheaper to remove some parts if you can get a better shipping rate.

Many boatmovers require that all of the fuel in the tanks be removed.

Section K-01
WEAVING THE DREAM


Section K-04
WESTSAIL 32 LINES DRAWING


This is the end of Section and the end of this manual


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